Prebiotics vs Probiotics

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bbc
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Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1580
   Posted 11/19/2008 10:15 AM (GMT -6)   
 
November 10, 2008

Probiotics, not so friendly after all?

New research indicates that many probiotics are ineffective and some may even cause harm. Now scientists say we should switch to prebiotics

Over the past two decades, it seemed that our guts had never had it so good. Probiotic products claiming to rid the body of the bad bacteria that causes illness burst on to the market and two million of us now swallow their promise of improved digestive health, provided by so-called “friendly bacteria”. We spend almost £350 million a year on drinks, yoghurts, powders and capsules, in the hope of improving our gut health. But is it money well spent? A growing number of experts think not. While they do not dispute that a balance of gut flora is beneficial, many believe that probiotics are not as helpful as was once thought.

Studies supporting the use of probiotics for general wellbeing, and as an additional support for people with specific illnesses, have been plentiful in recent years. This month, for instance, Swedish researchers revealed that a course of probiotics can offer protection for those with pneumonia. But critics are now doubting their usefulness. “In some areas, there is evidence that taking a probiotic supplement can be helpful,” says Anna Denny, a nutrition scientist at the British Nutrition Foundation. “But it is not clear-cut and not all probiotics are helpful to all people.”

The Russian Nobel prize winner, Élie Metchnikoff, is credited with having discovered probiotics at the beginning of the 20th century when he discovered that Bulgarian peasants who consumed milk containing fermenting bacteria appeared to enjoy extraordinarily good health.

It is now accepted among nutrition scientists that so-called friendly bacteria account for 10-15 per cent of bacteria in a healthy adult gut and that levels become depleted through a poor, low-fibre diet, or other factors such as stress, courses of antibiotics or illness. Proponents claim that probiotic supplements, which provide a regular shot of live, beneficial bacteria, help to top-up a body's natural supplies. But even those who were once self-confessed fanatics are questioning their place and proposing alternatives.

“Only highly resistant forms of bacteria, such as lactobacillus and bifidobacteria, have been shown to survive transit to the gut - others are likely to be destroyed by the highly acidic environment in the stomach,” says Professor Glenn Gibson, a food microbiologist at the University of Reading's school of life biosciences who is widely regarded as the UK's leading expert. “Unless capsules have a special enteric coating, they won't survive the transit. Heat also destroys probiotic bacteria, so if someone drinks a cup of coffee just before or after consuming them, the bacteria will be killed off.” In some tests, even if certain probiotics did survive, Professor Gibson found that they did not necessarily enhance gut flora, rendering them useless.

Lax labelling laws also mean that it is difficult for people to know which products are effective. Two years ago, Professor Gibson and Professor Christine Edwards, the head of human nutrition at Glasgow University, cautioned that 50 per cent of probiotic products do not have the healthy bacteria claimed on the label. Shoppers should be suspicious unless manufacturers stipulate that a capsule or drink provides a minimum of ten million bacteria per dose. Although the leading brands such as Yakult, Activia, Danone and Multibionta contain these amounts, many others “either have the wrong bacteria or the wrong numbers”, Professor Gibson says. One powder was withdrawn a couple of years ago as it contained clostridium, a bacteria that causes diarrhoea and colitis.

Probiotics have also been widely used for childhood allergies. Eczema is believed to be a disorder of the immune system and, since probiotics can enhance immunity, they have been considered effective. Yet two new studies question their use. Last month Dr Robert Boyle, a senior lecturer in paediatric allergy at Imperial College, London, found that use of probiotics in the treatment of childhood eczema was ineffective, even risky. In a review of 12 studies involving 781 children for the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Boyle found no evidence that probiotics reduced symptoms or altered the severity. He does not recommend that even healthy children take probiotics and he would not advise them for anyone with eczema.

Another recent trial, conducted at the University of Western Australia, showed that giving children a type of “good bacteria” early in life did nothing to reduce allergies as they grew up. Indeed, in one of their trials, Dr Susan Prescott and her colleagues gave 178 children either a probiotic or a placebo for the first six months of their life, those given the good bacteria were more, not less, likely to develop a sensitivity to allergens.

There are concerns, too, that in people with compromised immune systems friendly bacteria could be treated as hostile invaders by the body. Indeed, in their recent trial, the Cochrane researchers found probiotics to carry a risk of bowel damage and infection in children who were given them to treat their eczema. “A wide trawl of literature showed that, although probiotics are recognised as a safe treatment in otherwise healthy people, in those who are severely unwell, there is a significant risk in using them,” Dr Boyle says. Earlier this year, a controversial study at the University Medical Centre in Utrecht, Netherlands, reported that 24 out of 296 patients died during a study to find out whether probiotics affected inflammation of the pancreas. The Dutch food and consumer product safety authority ruled that the supplements should not be given to patients in intensive care.

Some NHS hospitals employ wide use of probiotics, often considered beneficial in the fight against MRSA, but others are becoming more cautious. At St George's Hospital in London, the chief dietitian, Catherine Collins, says that the risks for some patients are high. “A growing number of hospitals don't embrace probiotics as they used to, simply because we now know they can cause infections in vulnerable people,” Collins says. “They can lead to a potentially fatal illness called lactobacillus septicaemia and we have treated a few cases at St George's.”

According to some experts, the new bugs on the block - prebiotics, naturally present in food and easily obtained in the diet - are what we should have been taking all along. “Whereas probiotics provide new doses of bacteria, prebiotics nourish and feed the friendly bacteria already present,” Denny explains. Found naturally in breast milk, prebiotics are also present in foods that contain non-digestive carbohydrate (see box). “Substances such as inulin, a non-digestible part of carbohydrate, and oligosaccharides sail through the digestive system and are fermented to boost the immune system.”

Emerging trials on prebiotics, which are also available in supplement form and added to foods as diverse as breakfast cereals and desserts, show promise. This month, Professor Gibson has published a trial in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showing how the prebiotic powder Bimuno helped to prevent the natural decline in immunity for people aged 65 and older. “Typically, there is a natural decline in gut bacteria with age,” Professor Gibson says. “But in the study on volunteers aged 64 to 79, the prebiotic had a direct effect on immune defence cells and boosted immune function compared with a placebo.”

Another small study conducted by Dr Gemma Walton, a colleague of Professor Gibson's, compared the effects of prebiotics and probiotics in eight subjects. “We examined the faeces of the subjects daily to see whether the good bacteria had multiplied in number,” she says. “In the prebiotic group, there was an increase in good bacteria by 133 million, small in bacteria terms but an encouraging effect.” However, the probiotic group showed little change. “It seems that the best thing you can do is to treat your good bacteria to a prebiotic meal,” Dr Walton says.

Professor Gibson says: “Research on prebiotics is in its infancy, but is very encouraging. Not all probiotics are unhelpful. Some people can benefit. But if I was asked to choose, then I'd take prebiotic every time.”

Prebiotics: the new bugs on the block

Research at the Institute of Food Research in Norwich identified that finely ground almonds increased beneficial gut bacteria, although the effect was not seen when the fat content of the nuts was removed, suggesting that the gut bacteria used the almond lipids to grow.

A prebiotic-rich diet should contain 7g a day of inulin, found in oats, chicory, bananas, garlic and onions.

Commercially produced prebiotics, including cheese and dairy products, as well as supplements such as Bimuno, sprinkled on to cereals, can be helpful.

Breakfast cereals and cereal bars have a naturally occurring prebiotic. Eating cereals, including Shredded Wheat, Shreddies and Cheerios, was shown to increase two types of friendly bacteria in a test and in trials of 38 people who ate cereal daily for three weeks.

Some honey has prebiotic properties, says the University of Reading and the Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales in Madrid. Manuka honey from New Zealand has been shown in trials to encourage the growth of healthy bacteria.


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Moderate Pancolitis
Dx'd 05/2007
7 Pentasa per day (4/3)
Corti Foam p.m. 2X per week
Probiotics, Bowel Soother, Fish Oil, Calcium, Multi Vitamin and Melatonin
Trying to reduce sugar in my diet but cannot tolerate artificial sweetners
I excersice daily
Did I happen to mention I HATE this disease!!!


Christine1946
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 5465
   Posted 11/19/2008 4:31 PM (GMT -6)   
     Interesting.  Something I have to discuss with my GI doctor on Dec 13th.  He put me on probiotics while I was hospitalized in May.  Still taking Powerdolphilus twice daily.
62 yr old granny. South Jersey
Diagnosed with ulcerative proctitis in 1998 in hospital
Hospitalized (2nd time) in May 2008
Update 11/03/08...finally in remission!!  Hope I don't jinx myself.  Off the prednisone since 11/01/08...now see if I can stay off for longer than two weeks.  Other meds: 6MP (75 mgm), colazal (6 per day), Benicar and Toprol (high blood pressure meds), Probiotic (2 per day), fish oil capsule and multi-vitamin and calcium with vitamin D.


pb4
Elite Member


Date Joined Feb 2004
Total Posts : 17877
   Posted 11/19/2008 3:45 PM (GMT -6)   
I've seen enough research with probiotics that I have faith in, not to mention my own personal experiance with taking them so I won't be giving my probiotics up.

:)
My bum is broken....there's a big crack down the middle of it! LOL :)


crazytrain411
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 109
   Posted 11/19/2008 4:05 PM (GMT -6)   
I am taking probiotics AND prebiotics. I am currently taking a huge dose of about 500 billion bacteria daily from 14 different strains.

I think the key is strain diversity, large doses and pre-biotics. Also staying away from foods that feed the bad bacteria like carbs, sugar.
It is cruicial to get some strains, but all probiotics are not made the same, I didnt get much from a acidophilus only strain.


Im currently off all medication and under control with these supplements. Im not going to say 'cured' because that has pissed off some people before.

tongue

Probiotic
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 2738
   Posted 11/19/2008 9:13 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm certainly open minded to prebiotics, and not just probiotics, but from my experience, prebiotics can be vicious and harmful, presumably because they feed not just probiotics but also pathogenic bacteria. I have reacted badly to any product containing inulin, as well as pectin, as deliberate prebiotics. Not everyone may have this sensitivity, and there are variations in chain length of inulin that can affect its harmful effects, but prebiotics are not risk free for those of us with gut issues. I recall a splurge of interest in inulin on another IBD/IBS-oriented forum, and around a dozen of us actively tried it. I can't recall anyone who found it actually benefited.
Pancolitis 20 years ago, full med-free remission 10 years,
Flaring/simmering on and off ever since, allergic to all 5ASAs
10 20 17.5 15 12.5 10 mg 8 7.5 20 17.5 mg pred, 100 mg Imuran
TCM, Probiotics (Primal Defense and others), DMSO, TSO, hookworm
Turmeric/circuminboswellia, fish oil, many vits/minerals
Lower-carb version of Specific Carb Diet (SCD), Remicade newbie
 
 
 


bbc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1580
   Posted 11/19/2008 11:41 PM (GMT -6)   
I just ordered a bottle of New Zeland Manuka honey which is a great source of a prebiotic.
Moderate Pancolitis
Dx'd 05/2007
7 Pentasa per day (4/3)
Corti Foam p.m. 2X per week
Probiotics, Bowel Soother, Fish Oil, Calcium, Multi Vitamin and Melatonin
Trying to reduce sugar in my diet but cannot tolerate artificial sweetners
I excersice daily
Did I happen to mention I HATE this disease!!!


yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 11/20/2008 12:55 AM (GMT -6)   
From the research out there that I have seen, and from people on this site, it does seem that probiotics benefit many people. But prebiotics can be hard to tolerate, and always caused me increased gas and bloating, and during a flare that was the last thing I needed. Interestingly enough there is a prebiotic drink called Haldi that also works as an anti inflammatory and immune system modulator, and I know I have talked about it before, but it doesnt contain the inulin/etc. but instead has a highly active form of curcumin that seems to be beneficial by stimulating the growth and activity of my own normal flora. After doing a lot of research on this, I still believe that everyone has different GI flora, so promoting those that are indiginous to our own GI tracts for me was the best way to go. What I did was give them a better environment to thrive in.

bbc, I do like the idea of working more oats into my diet, as it seems to have a slight benefit with lowering cholesterol as well. And is lactulose/maltose considered prebiotics as well??
------------------------------------
yuckygut
diagnosed 1998
now off prednisone and colazal
drink 1 Haldi daily

bbc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1580
   Posted 11/20/2008 1:25 PM (GMT -6)   
yuckygut

I understand oats do in fact contain prebiotic
Moderate Pancolitis
Dx'd 05/2007
7 Pentasa per day (4/3)
Corti Foam p.m. 2X per week
Probiotics, Bowel Soother, Fish Oil, Calcium, Multi Vitamin and Melatonin
Trying to reduce sugar in my diet but cannot tolerate artificial sweetners
I excersice daily
Did I happen to mention I HATE this disease!!!


princesa
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 2198
   Posted 11/20/2008 2:43 PM (GMT -6)   
pb4 said...
I've seen enough research with probiotics that I have faith in, not to mention my own personal experiance with taking them so I won't be giving my probiotics up.

:)

Same here. Jury's still out on prebiotics as far as I'm concerned.
Diagnosed with ulcerative colitis spring 1999.
 
Maintenance dose sulfasalazine.
Probiotics, l-glutamine and fish oil caps. George's aloe vera juice. Oregano oil antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal. Long-term remission with only minor blips.
 
 


yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 11/21/2008 11:49 PM (GMT -6)   
bbc, what is New Zealand Manuka honey, does it come from a certain type of plant pollen?

----------------------------------------------------------------

yuckygut

diangosed 1998

now off prednisone and colazal

drink 1 Haldi daily

AKB
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 992
   Posted 11/22/2008 2:40 PM (GMT -6)   
i had the same horrible reaction to FoS and inulin as prebiotic posted above. I stay far, far away from prebiotics (you can't avoid them really in food, but I avoid taking pills that actively seek them out to include them as an ingredient!)
Dx:

Left-sided UC, Jun 2005. Flex-sig only... clear for first 20cms, then inflamed through next 30cms.

Therapies:

Pharmaceutical: Lialda 2/day, Rowasa/hydrocort as needed
Probiotics: Primadophilus Bifidus
Naturals: Caprylic Acid, Vit ABCDE, Zinc, Turmeric, Bromelain, Fish Oil, Flax Oil


bbc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1580
   Posted 11/22/2008 11:17 PM (GMT -6)   

 

 

Just got my jar today...the stuff is most definetly not normal honey, even not like uncooked and unfiltered types...here's where I ordered mine: http://www.manukahoneyus.com/overview.html ...I would love to get this ina capsule form as the taste is kinda strong and you are advised to take 1 teaspoon it 30 mins before meals  and I think much less than a teaspoon of the 20+ version is plenty.

yuckygut said...
bbc, what is New Zealand Manuka honey, does it come from a certain type of plant pollen?

----------------------------------------------------------------

yuckygut

diangosed 1998

now off prednisone and colazal

drink 1 Haldi daily



Moderate Pancolitis
Dx'd 05/2007
7 Pentasa per day (4/3)
Corti Foam p.m. 2X per week
Probiotics, Bowel Soother, Fish Oil, Calcium, Multi Vitamin and Melatonin
Trying to reduce sugar in my diet but cannot tolerate artificial sweetners
I excersice daily
Did I happen to mention I HATE this disease!!!


yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 11/27/2008 2:54 AM (GMT -6)   
thanks bbc, I have always enjoyed honey in moderate amounts as kind of a natural anti inflammatory, even though I really like it because it tastes good. I will check out that site now, I do like darker honeys, but I sometimes worry about what plants the bees have been getting their pollen from.

------------------------------------------------------------

yuckygut

diagnosed 1998

now off prednisone and colazal

drink 1 Haldi daily to remain in remission

kazygirl
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 955
   Posted 11/27/2008 9:14 PM (GMT -6)   
interesting read....
 
i just started a new probiotic 4 days ago and the last 3 days there has been cramping and blood.
more than normal. i thought it might have been the beans i ate, but those are long gone and im still having issues.
just when i thought i was on the road to recovery.
grrrr
 
i wonder if i should stop the probiotics?
vsl#3 never worked for me either.
hmmm?
steph - 32 - female - gold coast australia - UC since 2000
severe UC in descending colon and sigmoid colon ONLY
mesalazine granules 3g x1 a day (much nicer than a million tablets a day)
prednisolone 25mg x1 a day (ick ick and did i say ick?)
enteric coated fish oil -omega 3 (so they get all the way to my colon)
vitamin D3 x1 a day
tumeric capsules - if i remember to take the bloody things.
i still eat what i want, when i want, if i feel like eating at all :(
 
 
 


bbc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1580
   Posted 11/27/2008 10:48 PM (GMT -6)   
I think adding a prebotic to the probiotics would be an interesting test
Moderate Pancolitis
Dx'd 05/2007
7 Pentasa per day (4/3)
Corti Foam p.m. 2X per week
Prebiotics and Probiotics, Bowel Soother, Fish Oil, Calcium, Multi Vitamin and Melatonin
Trying to reduce sugar in my diet but cannot tolerate artificial sweetners
I excersice daily
Did I happen to mention I HATE this disease!!!


yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 11/28/2008 11:21 PM (GMT -6)   

kazy, I am a firm believer and research seems to back it up that we all have different levels of normal flora in our guts.  I think the key is to optimize them, that is why the Haldi drinks have benefited me to the point of remission.  I actually had a doctor tell me that the normal flora we all have works like a separate organ, and when it isnt healthy then we can be open to issues.  Pb4, any articles out there on the subject of optimizing and growing the bacteria count that is unique to each person??

On a different note, I have had refried beans in the past that had stuck with me a long time, I think once the damage is done by a certain food, the inflammation stays around a long time.

----------------------------------------------------

yuckygut

diagnosed in 1998

now off prednisone and colazal

drink 1 Haldi daily to remain in remission  


quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 25652
   Posted 11/29/2008 4:36 AM (GMT -6)   
The food you eat wouldn't cause inflammation damage in the colon.
*Heather* Status..Asacol 6 (3 twice daily); enemas every 4th night
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed
~vitamins/minerals/supplements 
~Probiotics....(Natural Factors Protec 2 or 3  +   1 or 2 Primadophilus Reuteri Pearls @ bedtime
~multi-digestive enzymes as needed
~Ranitidine,Pariet (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma)
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 


yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 12/2/2008 2:49 AM (GMT -6)   
quincy, if a certain food causes you to flare, is that not due to inflammation in the colon, or does it affect the stomach first and then cause some sort of inflammatory response? I have a friend with celiac disease, does that affect her colon , or her whole digestive tract?

-----------------------------------------------------------
yuckygut

diagnosed 1998

now off prednisone and colazal

drink 1 Haldi daily

quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 25652
   Posted 12/2/2008 3:15 AM (GMT -6)   
food doesn't cause flares....some may believe it does, but I'm not of that following. With almost 20 years since diagnosis, I've tested that theory to the limit. Yes, food will cause me diarrhea, even constipation....but never a flare, for once it's out, symptoms are gone.

Celiac disease does not affect the colon...it's origin is in the small intestine which is completely intolerant to the gluten found in foods. Gluten is a poison to the small intestine, leading to its destruction with continued intake.
One with Celiac disease can never have gluten...ever...without having a reaction.  No meds will improve the state of Celiac disease or allow a person to consume gluten.

It's the reaction to the gluten is what causes the inflammation.

As a result of the inflammation, destruction of the lining continues with the inability of the small intestine to absorb nutrients needed by the body which can lead to deficiencies. The undigested chyme (I believe it's called) continues into the colon which can cause diarrhea..etc.because IT is not set up with the right kind of enzymes to digest that type of material.

make sense?
 
Now, there is a new buzz condition called gluten sensitivity....is that meaning actual celiac disease but a mild form? somewhat sensitive to gluten from leaky gut in the colon? allergy (being systemic and not in the small intestine)...etc? 
 
Whatever it may be....it would be separate to UC.   Lots can go on with UC....easy to put the blame on food.  I suggest keeping inflammation down for as long as possible with meds, and if not wanting or able to go without meds, to treat as early as possible before the obvious symptoms of diarrhea, bleeding, etc.   

quincy


*Heather* Status..Asacol 6 (3 twice daily); enemas every 5th night
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed
~vitamins/minerals/supplements 
~Probiotics....(Natural Factors Protec, Primadophilus Reuteri Pearls, Natural Factors Ultimate)....1 each  @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma)
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 

Post Edited (quincy) : 12/2/2008 1:22:09 AM (GMT-7)


bbc
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 1580
   Posted 12/2/2008 12:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Its often very difficult to know what is causing one's symptoms especially since so many UCers also have IBS...if certain foods cause excess gas, D etc then I'd stay away from them if at all possible...why add fuel to the flames?
Moderate Pancolitis
Dx'd 05/2007
7 Pentasa per day (4/3)
Corti Foam p.m. 2X per week
Prebiotics and Probiotics, Bowel Soother, Fish Oil, Calcium, Multi Vitamin and Melatonin
Trying to reduce sugar in my diet but cannot tolerate artificial sweetners
I excersice daily
Did I happen to mention I HATE this disease!!!


mbx5
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 365
   Posted 12/2/2008 9:48 PM (GMT -6)   
quincy - i want to believe that food doesnt cause a flare....however....just recently my symptoms were about clear....i still had d and some urgency occasionally but i was tolerating more food, and having regular bm's.... about a week ago i had some chili....it wrecked me....and now i am having a lot of mucus, light colored blood, and lots of mucus trips to the toilet....among my bm's.... i am not sure if the food caused it or it was stress related, etc....but after the chili incident i have been in a flare....maybe i was already in one and my symptoms just got worse and my colon is more irritated....but shouldnt it have gotten a bit better now that the chili is gone? only reason i am even bringing this up is because it is happening as i type this...
33 yr old male. UC for 14 years. 5mg pred (tapering off), 12 pills Asacol per day, Dicyclomine (for cramps), 0.5 - 1mg Atavan per day (anxiety) when needed, Fish oil pills, Culturelle probiotics. Recent Endonasal brain surgery to remove non-cancerous hormone producing tumor on pituitary gland (And I am still more afraid of my UC!!)  "I poop in the woods because I can"


yuckygut
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 214
   Posted 12/3/2008 1:52 AM (GMT -6)   
quincy, that does make sense, I think. Do you think that is why the Haldi organic drinks work for me, they keep down inflammation and settle down my immune system? I thought for a long time that most of my problem was from the food I ate, I may have to rethink that now. But I am a strong believer that inflammation and my own out of whack immune system, some how plotted against me to cause my UC. I am glad to have resolved those issues at least for now with something other than prednisone which was destroying me slowly(or not so slowly). But I am always looking to learn more about all of these digestive disorders, thanks for the info.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

yuckygut

diagnosed 1998

now off prednisone and colazal

drink 1 Haldi daily to remain in remission

quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 25652
   Posted 12/3/2008 5:30 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi yuckygut...I don't know much about the Haldi drinks...How much tumeric is supposed to be in them? how many do you drink a day? Would you mind to list the ingredients?

There are many who are in remission with or without meds. I'm a med lifer, but pretty much in a remission state continually with a few minor flare symptoms that I do treat by increasing the rectal meds.
Seems to be working well as of my last c-scope over a year ago.

I would suggest that you try to avoid using pred if you can help it for future flares...since you've used Colazal, you might want to consider the rectal retention enemas as the first symptoms (first) of a flare.
You'll know by the changes.

I certainly couldn't say that they will help keep you in remission.....couldn't hurt regardless unless you were allergic or sensitive to any of the ingredients in them (which seems you aren't).

Continue to feel well....enjoy....

quincy
*Heather* Status..Asacol 6 (3 twice daily); enemas every 5th night
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed
~vitamins/minerals/supplements 
~Probiotics....(Natural Factors Protec, Primadophilus Reuteri Pearls, Natural Factors Ultimate)....1 each  @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma)
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 


quincy
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2003
Total Posts : 25652
   Posted 12/3/2008 5:42 AM (GMT -6)   
mbx5....
Is your UC throughout or limited?

Chili isn't the reason for your symptoms...you're flaring or still flaring. You may have IBS symptoms as well...and I suppose if you have hemmies or a fissure, that could be the cause of some of the blood. But, if you have urgency with only mucus and blood..I would say it's a flare. If that were me...I'd be back on the rectal meds nightly pronto. I always get rectal white-knuckling pain/cramping during bms...the clincher (no matter how mild) that it's a flare.

Are you still on 12 Asacol? Are you still tapering pred?

Getting back to the food aspect...not all people can eat all foods. Not all foods agree with us.

Also remember that some of us has IBS with UC symptoms.

Nothing like being clear as mud...but if you focus on the food aspect, you miss the actual symptoms of your flares.

If I eat whatever and I may get diarrhea or loose stool...some foods I would expect that.

You could consider to add a fibre supplement to help bulk the stool...it might help with the mucus and looser stool.

quincy
*Heather* Status..Asacol 6 (3 twice daily); enemas every 5th night
~diagnosed January 1989 UC (proctosigmoiditis)
~Bentylol (dicyclomine) 20mg as needed
~vitamins/minerals/supplements 
~Probiotics....(Natural Factors Protec, Primadophilus Reuteri Pearls, Natural Factors Ultimate)....1 each  @ bedtime
~various digestive enzymes as needed
~Ranitidine (reflux);  Effexor XR 75mg(depression);  Pulmicort/Airomir (asthma)
~URSO for PSC (or PBC) 500mg X 2 daily (LFTs back to NORMAL!!)
My doc's logic.. "TREAT (FROM)BOTH ENDS"  worth it !!!
 


mbx5
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 365
   Posted 12/3/2008 1:33 PM (GMT -6)   
my uc was limited to left side only for a while but now throughout....have had this a while now... i would imagine ibs is working in there too - and definitely have hemm. issue....was taking some analphram for that... i will be calling my gi to get some rectal stuff again. pain and cramping there too.

should update my signature. i am on 12 asacol. no more pred and havent taken probiotics or fishoil for some time. if the flare continues i may have to do a cycle of pred again.

cant do remicade because of the tumor issue i had....they arent recommending it....

thanks for the help.
33 yr old male. UC for 14 years. 5mg pred (tapering off), 12 pills Asacol per day, Dicyclomine (for cramps), 0.5 - 1mg Atavan per day (anxiety) when needed, Fish oil pills, Culturelle probiotics. Recent Endonasal brain surgery to remove non-cancerous hormone producing tumor on pituitary gland (And I am still more afraid of my UC!!)  "I poop in the woods because I can"

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