what criteria to use for fecal transfer donor?

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tinanseoul
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Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 12/7/2010 4:37 PM (GMT -6)   
I wanted to know what critieria you used for your donor when doing an at-home fecal transfer.  I'm doing a fecal transfer on my young son to repopulate his gut.  His stools smell horrific and look like mud every single day unless he ONLY eats meat and eggs and drinks broth.  No diary, no grains, no sugar, no fruits, no veggies and no nuts etc < ----- if he those things, his stools smell like something died in his rectum and and smells like death.  I've taken his diapers to his peditrician and he said it was fine.  It's not.  I know his gut flora is bad, bad, bad.  We've been on the GAPS diet for 10 months to heal his gut with little success.  I don't think a fecal transfer is drastic; I think it's natural and the absolutely, very best way to get the good bacteria in his gut.  We've drained our bank account on expensive probiotics that did virtually nothing.  If I don't heal my son, he'll only get worse. 
 
I have found a donor and she is healthy and according to her mother (and my friend), she has had a normal stool since she's been born - no constipation and diarrhea only when she has a stomach bug. 
 
I would like to know from those persons who have done fecal transfer what your criteria was for choosing a healthy stool donor.  I understand a family member would be best for my son but none of our guts are in good enough shape to be used as an donor.  
 
Thanks!

killcolitis
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Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 2396
   Posted 12/7/2010 5:48 PM (GMT -6)   
We are trying to figure this out for ourselves with our daughter with UC. If you look up Dr. Borody's 2003 article (called something like "toying with human motions") he lists all of the criteria he tests for. Would your friend (the potential donor's mother) subject her to blood tests (and stool tests, obviously much less invasive)? This would be necessary to test according to Dr. Borody's criteria. I've spoken to a Dr. with UC who successfully used FT to heal his gut and his advise to me was to treat it as you would a blood transfusion -same principles apply. Good luck.

tinanseoul
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Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 12/7/2010 6:07 PM (GMT -6)   
I should have written that I've know the donor for over a year and I am quite confident that she doesn't have diseases that can be passed through stool or blood. So I won't be paying for those tests. I have looked at her stools for several days and it looks "healthy." Her stools don't float which means she is digesting both her fats and carbs fine. Her stools are brown in color which means her liver and gallbladder are working well. Her stools don't smell awful another indication that her stools are healthy. Plus she has never been on antibiotics so her gut flora has never been wiped out. She has never had a sinus infection, ear infection, yeast infection or eczema which are all indications of yeast overgrowth which would affect the gut flora in a negative way. She has a regular stool every day. She's strong, smart and of average height and weight for a child her age also an indication that she absorbing her food well and you have to have good gut flora to absorb nutrients.

I wonder if others check their donor stools or asked lots of questions regarding their stools or get bacteria tests done although I've read those are mainly unreliable since there are hundreds if not thousands of strains of bacteria in gut.

Tina

killcolitis
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Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 2396
   Posted 12/7/2010 6:18 PM (GMT -6)   
Well, it depends on your comfort level. Both my husband and I had ourselves tested. i just would not give my daughter stool that was not tested even from myself (and I have never had any GI issues). I've even had certain tests repeated. We have even done more testing than Dr Borody recommended (ie. we did h pylori, my husband tested positive). I've just received a result saying all okay except I have epstein barr antibodies (though not the virus, so I don't know if it's contagious but I am very wary). I'm trying to figure out how to proceed in light of this. This girl may seem healthy, as my daughter did until the DAY she started with bloody diarrhea which never stopped but you never know. Would you give your son a blood transfusion from someone who looked healthy without further testing? Personally, I would pay for the tests. Good luck.

Probiotic
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Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 2751
   Posted 12/7/2010 7:11 PM (GMT -6)   
I tested myself and my wife for much of, but not all of the things listed on the Borody protocol and it cost almost $1500 for my wife alone. If I had to do it again I am not sure I would have bothered with the insane expense. Some of the results were grey areas to interpret, as well, because in many cases having antibodies to something is typical of most people in the population. FYI I quit doing the fecal experiment after a few days because it actually flared me up.
"In order to save the village organ, we had to destroy remove it" -- Doctor's Prescriber's proverb. 
 

killcolitis
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Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 2396
   Posted 12/7/2010 7:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Probiotic, If I were doing this on myself, I honestly wouldn't bother. With my kid, different story. Having said that, the EPV antibodies is confusing me, since it is common. I think I'll have my daughter tested next time she has blood work done and then proceed.

tinanseoul
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 12/7/2010 7:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Killcolitis - I would do a blood transfusion if I knew the donor and his health and if I could check his blood like I can with stool. This little girl is my older's son best freind. They play endlessly at my house. They see each other every day. And she had the stomach bug several weeks ago and then my boys and I got it so we've already been exposed to her stool. Plus, we've been doing GAPS diet (which is very similiar to the SCD diet) for 10 months. When we are off GAPS (which I hope is after the fecal transfer which I will be doing on myself as well), we will continue to make nourishing broths, eating fats (lard, beef tallow, ghee from grass-fed animals along with coconut oil), eating organic produce, and homemade fermented foods/drinks <----this will be the bulk of our diet. I don't plan on feeding my family the standard american diet ever. I am way more concerned that my son will get worse than I am concerned with getting a disease from abundantly healthy 7 year girl's stool.

I have read that if one's donor stool doesn't work, try another. I agree wholeheartedly agree with this.

tinanseoul
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 12/7/2010 8:03 PM (GMT -6)   
I should say that once our guts are healed with the donor's stool the there is very little chance disease could live in a nourished body even if we're exposed to something. And actually we are exposed to diseases every day when leave our house.

Tina
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