New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

sak147
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 29
   Posted 4/4/2011 7:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi All,
 
I thought maybe on here I read that melatonin is not good for people with UC, I can't quite remember though. My therapist has reccomended it to me as not sleeping is my biggest problem (even before pred. I pretty much could never sleep). I have tried pretty much everything OTC (tylenol PM, homeopathic meds. etc) I have also tried trazadone, It just seems that all those meds. do not help me fall asleep any faster and I end up feeling like crap in the morning. I have taken 3mg of the melatonin for about 4 days now and it does not seem to bother me. Is it just one of those things that bothers some people but not others or is there a legit reason not to take it with UC. At the moment I am having no UC symptoms, but am still on my pred. taper since being discharged from hosp.
 
Thanks for any info.
Shawna 33/f
Diagnosed UC (limited) 12/22/10
Colazal 750mg 9/day, Prednisone 60mg (as of 3/2/11)
Celexa 40mg 1/day (for depression and anxiety disorder)
Lorazepam .5mg 1 at bedtime for sleep.
VSL #3, Vitamin D, Fish Oil, Multivitamin
Tried but did not work Asacol, Cort-Enemas

beeswax
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 545
   Posted 4/4/2011 7:18 PM (GMT -6)   
I just ordered some as I too have sleeping problems. I have heard if you have autoimmune disorders you should avoid it, not sure why. Anyway, I ordered the 1mg as I figured that would be safer, start low and add if needed. I too remember someone posting about it. I will search the forum and see if I find it.
F/51; Present: Lialda 4.8 gm a day; Calcium; Vitamin D 50,000 unit once a week; Diagnosed UP 1993; Diagnosed UC 8/08; Diagnosed Osteoporosis 12/09; In The Past: Remicade-Asacol-Rowasa-Anucort-Canasa-Prednisone

beeswax
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 545
   Posted 4/4/2011 7:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Here is the link I remember. It seems some people have problems and some don't:

http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=38&m=1800674

Here is another link that contains outside links that state it has positive effects on UC. Just goes to show the contradictory information available:

http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=38&m=1165480
F/51; Present: Lialda 4.8 gm a day; Calcium; Vitamin D 50,000 unit once a week; Diagnosed UP 1993; Diagnosed UC 8/08; Diagnosed Osteoporosis 12/09; In The Past: Remicade-Asacol-Rowasa-Anucort-Canasa-Prednisone

Post Edited (beeswax) : 4/4/2011 6:25:54 PM (GMT-6)


journey2health
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 2687
   Posted 4/4/2011 10:17 PM (GMT -6)   
If you are willing to invest $20 (six weeks supply for women), I got a product called ZMA. (Google ZMA and sleep)

It is Zinc/Magnesium and a vitamin B compound. I take 2 ever night 90 to 30 minutes before bedtime. It does help give you a deep sleep.

I tried melatonin and it did nothing for me. When I feel too wired I take a quarter milligram of klonopin along with the ZMA. Seems to work although I really don't like taking the Klonopin. I get myself wired at night so it's my own fault. It's not good sleep hygeine.

Good luck. Feel better!

Alba29
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 253
   Posted 4/5/2011 5:43 AM (GMT -6)   
I take 10 mg and sleep great. It's also beneficial for UC because it's an antioxidant.

Melatonin expresses powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities resulting in complete improvement of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

Tahan G, Gramignoli R, Marongiu F, Aktolga S, Cetinkaya A, Tahan V, Dorko K.

Department of Human Resources, University of Pittsburgh, 5846 Hobart Street FL2, Pittsburgh, PA 15217, USA. gulgunsahintahan@yahoo.com
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Increased free-radical production, decreased antioxidant capacity, and excessive inflammation are well-known features in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant and a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals. Melatonin has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory activities in tissues. Our study objective is to investigate the effects of melatonin on tissue inflammatory activities using an ulcerative colitis (UC) model induced by acetic acid (AA) in rats.

METHODS: Wistar rats (n = 32) were divided into four groups. AA-induced colitis was performed in two of the groups, while the other two groups were injected with saline intrarectally. One of the AA-induced colitis groups and one of the control groups were administered 100 mg/kg/day melatonin intraperitoneally, and the pair groups were given saline. After 4 days, colonic changes were evaluated biochemically by measuring proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6], myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and superoxide di****ase (SOD) levels in tissue homogenates and by histopathological examination.

RESULTS: AA caused colonic mucosal injury, whereas melatonin suppressed these changes in the AA-induced colitis group (P < 0.001). AA administration resulted in increased TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MPO, and MDA levels, and decreased GSH and SOD levels, whereas melatonin administration reversed these effects (all P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: The present study proposes that melatonin has a dual action as an effective anti-inflammatory and an antioxidant, and may be a hopeful therapeutic agent for UC.

Gastrointestinal melatonin: localization, function, and clinical relevance.

Bubenik GA.

Department of Zoology, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Abstract

The gastrointestinal tract of vertebrate species is a rich source of extrapineal melatonin. The concentration of melatonin in the gastrointestinal tissues surpasses blood levels by 10-100 times and there is at least 400x more melatonin in the gastrointestinal tract than in the pineal gland. The gastrointestinal tract contributes significantly to circulating concentrations of melatonin, especially during the daytime and melatonin may serve as an endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine hormone influencing the regeneration and function of epithelium, enhancing the immune system of the gut, and reducing the tone of gastrointestinal muscles. As binding sites for melatonin exhibit circadian variation in various species, it has been hypothesized that some melatonin found in the gastrointestinal tract might be of pineal origin. Unlike the photoperiodically regulated production of melatonin in the pineal, the release of gastrointestinal melatonin seems to be related to the periodicity of food intake. Phylogenetically, melatonin and its binding sites were detected in the gastrointestinal tract of lower vertebrates, birds, and mammals. Melatonin was found also in large quantities in the embryonic tissue of the mammalian and avian gastrointestinal tract. Food intake and, paradoxically, also longterm food deprivation resulted in an increase of tissue and plasma concentrations of melatonin. Melatonin release may have a direct effect on many gastrointestinal tissues but may also well influence the digestive tract indirectly, via the central nervous system and the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves. Melatonin prevents ulcerations of gastrointestinal mucosa by an antioxidant action, reduction of secretion of hydrochloric acid, stimulation of the immune system, fostering epithelial regeneration, and increasing microcirculation. Because of its unique properties, melatonin could be considered for prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, gastric ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, and childhood colic.

and another article

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ibd.20527/full
modified SCD with no sulfites and lots of resistant starch.
Sulfa EC 4 pills/day, canasa
Multi, VSL3, Florastor, Vitamin D, Turmeric, Boswellia, EC lecithin, lactoferrin, propolis, ginkgo biloba and melatonin.

sak147
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 29
   Posted 4/5/2011 7:35 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you all so much for the info.

I guess there really is no conclusive answer and with the info provided by Alba29 is seems it may actually be beneficial. I am not sure if the melatonin is helping anyway as I have been taking it along with .5mg of lorazepam but I would like to stop the lorazepam. I am going to try just taking the melatonin for a few days and see what happens. Since it doesn't seem to be bothering my UC I guess I won't worry too much about it.

Beeswax- Thanks for the links.

Journey2Health- I am also going to look into the ZMA you mentioned, I figure $20 is a small price to pay for a good nights sleep.
Shawna 33/f
Diagnosed UC (limited) 12/22/10
Colazal 750mg 9/day, Prednisone 60mg (as of 3/2/11) will taper to 20mg 4//5/11
Celexa 40mg 1/day (for depression and anxiety disorder)
Lorazepam .5mg 1 at bedtime for sleep.
VSL #3, Vitamin D, Fish Oil, Multivitamin
Tried but did not work Asacol, Cort-Enemas

suebear
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 5418
   Posted 4/5/2011 8:42 AM (GMT -6)   
Have you tried getting exercise? Even something as mild as walking can help to induce sleep.

Sue

sak147
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 29
   Posted 4/5/2011 11:04 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks Sue
I definately agree about the exercise and it is something I do really need to work on.

Shawna
Shawna 33/f
Diagnosed UC (limited) 12/22/10
Colazal 750mg 9/day, Prednisone 60mg (as of 3/2/11) will taper to 20mg 4//5/11
Celexa 40mg 1/day (for depression and anxiety disorder)
Lorazepam .5mg 1 at bedtime for sleep.
VSL #3, Vitamin D, Fish Oil, Multivitamin
Tried but did not work Asacol, Cort-Enemas
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Monday, October 20, 2014 5:43 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,247,006 posts in 249,979 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 157376 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, Gadeaux.
456 Guest(s), 19 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
hmurray, hornet599, lymebarthiker, billybologna, bridgestone_44, Scaredy Cat, Admin, bertb, IHL, jk1978, Wayne519, Marauder93, Qrskidmore, keaz, Poppie, Tall Allen, Buzzbomb, Cornell, lapilot


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest  Follow HealingWell.com on YouTube
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2014 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer