Resistant Starch diet improves UC

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aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 1:54 PM (GMT -6)   
This diet is supposed to correct the flora and allow improved processing of fiber resulting in higher butyrate and healing mucosal layers. Anybody try it ? Been on it for a few days now. Navy beans over Black beans is how I am going to proceed. Less ordinary fiber that way.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10647628

Dietary resistant starch and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

These studies were performed to test the benefit of resistant starch on ulcerative colitis via prebiotic and butyrate effects. Butyrate, propionate, and acetate are produced in the colon of mammals as a result of microbial fermentation of resistant starch and other dietary fibers. Butyrate plays an important role in the colonic mucosal growth and epithelial proliferation. A reduction in the colonic butyrate level induces chronic mucosal atrophy. Short-chain fatty acid enemas increase mucosal generation, crypt length, and DNA content of the colonocytes. They also ameliorate symptoms of ulcerative colitis in human patients and rats injected with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Butyrate, and also to a lesser degree propionate, are substrates for the aerobic energy metabolism, and trophic factors of the colonocytes. Adverse butyrate effects occur in normal and neoplastic colonic cells. In normal cells, butyrate induces proliferation at the crypt base, while inhibiting proliferation at the crypt surface. In neoplastic cells, butyrate inhibits DNA synthesis and arrests cell growth in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The improvement of the TNBS-induced colonic inflammation occurred earlier in the resistant starch (RS)-fed rats than in the RS-free group. This benefit coincided with activation of colonic epithelial cell proliferation and the subsequent restoration of apoptosis. The noncollagenous basement membrane protein laminin was regenerated initially in the RS-fed group, demonstrating what could be a considered lower damage to the intestinal barrier function. The calculation of intestinal short-chain fatty acid absorption confirmed this conclusion. The uptake of short-chain fatty acids in the colon is strongly inhibited in the RS-free group, but only slightly reduced in the animals fed with RS. Additionally, RS enhanced the growth of intestinal bacteria assumed to promote health. Further studies involving patients suffering from ulcerative colitis are necessary to determine the importance of RS in the therapy of a number of intestinal diseases and the maintenance of health.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistant_starch

Ulcerative colitis

Foods naturally rich in resistant starch may be beneficial in individuals with ulcerative colitis. One study presented at the 7th Congress of European Crohn’s and Colitis Organization (ECCO) meeting, Feb 16-18, 2012 in Barcelona, Spain found that resistant starch combined with wheat bran effectively treated ulcerative colitis.

/www.ecco-ibd.eu/publications/congress-abstract-s/item/p208-abnorm.html

Abnormal fibre utilisation and gut transit in ulcerative colitis in remission: A potential new target for dietary intervention

Conclusions: Fibre utilisation in the gut of patients with UC in remission is impaired. High WB/RS supplementation enhanced fibre utilisation and normalised WGTT. As it is well tolerated, its corrective effect on fermentation and transit may translate into therapeutic benefits during remission in patients with UC.

Old Mike
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   Posted 3/30/2013 2:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Yea been thinking about it for quite a long time,also cold potatoes and or cold rice.
Sort of flies in the face of SCD/Paleo,but then again with those diets might be what you are not eating.
Old Mike

aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 2:31 PM (GMT -6)   
Old Mike said...
Yea been thinking about it for quite a long time,also cold potatoes and or cold rice.
Sort of flies in the face of SCD/Paleo,but then again with those diets might be what you are not eating.
Old Mike


Yes I noticed Navy and Black are 'allowable' foods in SCD with mention of 'special preparation'. I am fairly certain RS was not discussed when she formulated SCD. Elaine wants over ripe bananas with brown spots no green at all. RS calls for greenies, chilled being better.

Potatoes chilled probably flies directly in the face of SCD. I like the beans because temp is not a concern for their RS sub type.

I used to get italian food and bought the same pasta they used but it did not seem to have the same positive effect. Now I know why, I would by a large pan and graze on it cold out of the fridge. When I myself made it - well it was always prepared hot. Temp effects that sub type.

I am also avoiding nitrates as they destroy B1 and it sounded like B1 deficiency in a person would begin to look like UC after a few months. Any potato item without its skin is likely to have them. I checked my 'Simply potatoes' green bag and yep had to stop preparing them.

Hopefully together with spinach and yogurt this will be a positive change to my diet and improve UC. I need whole lot less doctors in my life.

aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 2:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Here is the bit on the flora changing or correcting with RS

The purported benefits of resistant starch derive in part from their resistance to digestion, as well as their partial digestion in the lower gut, says Michael Keenan, a professor of human nutrition and food at Louisiana State University and the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center in Baton Rouge. Keenan has studied the effects of resistant starch on lab animals.

When lab rodents were fed a diet that consisted of as much as 25% of a type of resistant starch called RS2, they ended up with less body fat than rodents eating the same number of calories but no resistant starch, Keenan says. In addition to burning more fat, the rodents consuming the starch developed a different set of microflora, or bacteria, in their large intestine.

Keenan says this proliferation of bacteria in the gut could be a predictor of improved long-term health prospects: Human studies have indicated that obese people and people with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis have a different set of microflora than lean, healthy people. Still, the precise implications of the rodent experiment for humans remains unknown.

imagardener2
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   Posted 3/30/2013 3:16 PM (GMT -6)   
This fits with my plan to make cold potato salad for Easter dinner :-)
Thanks for the info, verrrry interesting.
Current diet=modified Paleo (sm amts of swiss cheese and some fruit OK)
In remission April 2010 after 10 years of UC with no remission ever
gluten-free (bleeding stopped) and dairy-free (less gas) started remission path+food diary
current meds=(9)Balsalazide+(2)Citrucel,(1) VSL#3 nightly
Rx meds have never worked for me except for mesalamine enema

Old Mike
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   Posted 3/30/2013 3:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Starch diet Mcdougall,there is lots out there from this doc  whether right or wrong,beans,potato rice,and the beans 'will inhibit protease.  If a starch diet lowers or changes the bile then perhaps also the bacteria types will change,remember the milk fat studies.
Old Mike
chained to the bathroom
sounds difficult this is probably only partially correct not sure
 
and here is a thread from healing well

aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 3:53 PM (GMT -6)   
So many good facts about Western diet and bowel contents. This was really positive, and has me thinking I am really ready to change my ways - all the way, to avoid the snowballing health problems from recurring.

"I believe the best diet for preventing and treating all forms of colitis is based upon starches with the addition of fruits and vegetables. This diet is also devoid of all free fats (all vegetable oils) and all animal products. If this fails to resolve the problems then the next step is to eliminate wheat products. Finally, the elimination diet should be tried to search out any offending foods. With this approach I have seen most people with colitis improve and many cured of their conditions – including those with the more serious forms of IBD. There is no reason not to believe this and try a healthy diet for a period of time (say 4 months). There are no added costs and no side effects from this approach and there is a real possibility of excellent health being the result."

"Obviously, the contents of the bowel must have a determining effect upon its health. Therefore, logic dictates that a person wishing to keep his/her bowels healthy should put good foods in them. Whether it is heart disease, cancer, obesity or diabetes that is being discussed, the diet that is recommended is a diet high in complex carbohydrates and low in animal foods and fats – in other words a plant-based diet. There should be no surprise that the same diet is “bowel-healthy” too."

Example :

"A person with a functioning healthy small intestine re-absorbs the bile secreted from the liver in the last part of the small intestine, called the ileum. In patients with Crohn's Disease, this portion of the ileum often is damaged and unable to absorb the bile. Bile continues to flow through the ileum into the large intestine, where it causes irritation and discharge of mucus and water. In these patients, the immediate benefit from a change in diet is the decrease in bile acids produced by the liver as a response to lowering the fat content of the foods eaten. In addition, the fibers introduced in a plant-based diet bind and neutralize many of the bile acids and absorb free water present in the stool."

aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 4:01 PM (GMT -6)   
He has a message board too where they are discussing Resistant Starch.

McDougall

www.drmcdougall.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=34926&view=next


Denver Study

www.coloradocancerblogs.org/a-diet-of-resistant-starch-helps-the-body-resist-colorectal-cancer/

It seems like RS is still kind of new and not being talked about much. I'm onboard. Seemed like Navy Beans ( hard to find at store, not popular in western diet paced back and forth and found 2 cans ) gave me normal waste, black beans have more regular fiber than I can handle yet and no change from them so Navy being very high in RS is the way to go for me. I still have to remove chicken, eggs, yogurt, cheese if I go the McDougall route.....trying phase 1 first.

imagardener2
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   Posted 3/30/2013 4:25 PM (GMT -6)   
almost all stores have navy beans in the dried bean section. You should soak them overnight and change the water twice to remove a natural enzyme before cooking them (tripsin inhibitors which are anti-nutrients).

This from the Bean Institute:
"In contrast, resistant starches increased, from 3.1 to between 5 and 8 g/100 g, after soaked beans were heat processed."

I've been avoiding beans due to the fiber but perhaps a few navy beans would be good to try in a bean dip with olive oil.

aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 4:38 PM (GMT -6)   
imagardener2 said...
almost all stores have navy beans in the dried bean section. You should soak them overnight and change the water twice to remove a natural enzyme before cooking them (tripsin inhibitors which are anti-nutrients).

This from the Bean Institute:
"In contrast, resistant starches increased, from 3.1 to between 5 and 8 g/100 g, after soaked beans were heat processed."

I've been avoiding beans due to the fiber but perhaps a few navy beans would be good to try in a bean dip with olive oil.


Hey thanks for the tip !

I figured they did that before they put them in the can no ?

TheAnswersYouSeek
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   Posted 3/30/2013 4:57 PM (GMT -6)   
Indeed.. the new doc put me on butyrate and woohoo finally Im making some real head way. Two days in and I had my thickest poop in as long as I can remember. Ive been asking GIs for butyrate enemas for a decade now but all they would give me were the normal scripts. I dunno why I hadnt clued in that I could have just ordered butyrate and made my own darn enemas.

I had been trying to eat lots of RS1 and RS3 resistant starches but the going was slow.. and I get tired of beans. I eat them every day.

Im doing oral sodium butyrate at this point but might do some enema implants. Id really like to be done with enemas in any way so Im hoping the oral dosing can get dialed down enough to say goodbye to them.
Current: No Dairy, Sugar, Wheat or Soy.. Olive leaf (20% Oleuoropein), Lauricidin/monolaurin, NA-Cysteine, CoQ10, Psyllium/Apple pectin, Ferula, Triphalia, methylation pathway support, sodium butyrate, anantamul, Blis K12, VSL#3, PB8, Proteolytic enzymes, Proferrin

aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/30/2013 5:16 PM (GMT -6)   
PathogenKiller said...
Indeed.. the new doc put me on butyrate and woohoo finally Im making some real head way. Two days in and I had my thickest poop in as long as I can remember. Ive been asking GIs for butyrate enemas for a decade now but all they would give me were the normal scripts. I dunno why I hadnt clued in that I could have just ordered butyrate and made my own darn enemas.

I had been trying to eat lots of RS1 and RS3 resistant starches but the going was slow.. and I get tired of beans. I eat them every day.

Im doing oral sodium butyrate at this point but might do some enema implants. Id really like to be done with enemas in any way so Im hoping the oral dosing can get dialed down enough to say goodbye to them.


Hey I tried that - Oracle 'Butyrate complex' calcium,magnesium,butyric acid calcium-magnesium butyrate and their website said 'do not take if you have ulcerative colitis'

???

"Contra-indications
Do not use during pregnancy or if pregnancy is being planned.
Not suitable for individuals with colitis, gastritis or ulcerative conditions of the stomach or colon.
More Info about Butyrate Complex by Pharmax:
"
www.healingedge.net/store/product1840.html

TheAnswersYouSeek
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   Posted 3/30/2013 10:04 PM (GMT -6)   
I dont think you want calcium butyrate. He put me on sodium butyrate.
www.amazon.com/BodyBio-E-Lyte-Sodium-Butyrate-caps/dp/B0058A9SF0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364698990&sr=8-1&keywords=sodium+butyrate he told me to take it with 100-200mg of L-Glutamine (only that ingredient, no mixes)
1000 mg x 3 a day
Current: No Dairy, Sugar, Wheat or Soy.. Olive leaf (20% Oleuoropein), Lauricidin/monolaurin, NA-Cysteine, CoQ10, Psyllium/Apple pectin, Ferula, Triphalia, methylation pathway support, sodium butyrate, anantamul, Blis K12, VSL#3, PB8, Proteolytic enzymes, Proferrin

freddyj
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   Posted 3/30/2013 11:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Pk- so you got on butyrate but have no ostomy correct? I ask my doctor about it and he said if you had no stool I would say you need it but you have plenty so no problem..... Didnt make sense to me.
currently on:
Asacol 1.6 g/3X per day
Transdermal LDN 4.5 mg/day
Various supplements
And no Quincy, Im not on mesalamine enemas.
didnt work for me.

TheAnswersYouSeek
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   Posted 3/31/2013 8:56 AM (GMT -6)   
yeah, I dont have an ostomy.
Current: No Dairy, Sugar, Wheat or Soy.. Olive leaf (20% Oleuoropein), Lauricidin/monolaurin, NA-Cysteine, CoQ10, Psyllium/Apple pectin, Ferula, Triphalia, methylation pathway support, sodium butyrate, anantamul, Blis K12, VSL#3, PB8, Proteolytic enzymes, Proferrin

freddyj
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   Posted 3/31/2013 10:43 AM (GMT -6)   
And its helping. That kind of pisses me off. Is it hard to get or what?
currently on:
Asacol 1.6 g/3X per day
Transdermal LDN 4.5 mg/day
Various supplements
And no Quincy, Im not on mesalamine enemas.
didnt work for me.

freddyj
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Date Joined Aug 2011
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   Posted 3/31/2013 10:46 AM (GMT -6)   
So are you taking it both orally and rectally? And are you making your own enemas also or just the oral concoction???
currently on:
Asacol 1.6 g/3X per day
Transdermal LDN 4.5 mg/day
Various supplements
And no Quincy, Im not on mesalamine enemas.
didnt work for me.

freddyj
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Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 1168
   Posted 3/31/2013 10:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Do tell! And thanks for the link...
currently on:
Asacol 1.6 g/3X per day
Transdermal LDN 4.5 mg/day
Various supplements
And no Quincy, Im not on mesalamine enemas.
didnt work for me.

TheAnswersYouSeek
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Date Joined Jan 2013
Total Posts : 2543
   Posted 3/31/2013 11:45 AM (GMT -6)   
It is helping. Im only taking it orally because Im so.sick.of.enemas. Its working so Im just giving it time. He did say to take it with the L-Glutamine tho
Current: No Dairy, Sugar, Wheat or Soy.. Olive leaf (20% Oleuoropein), Lauricidin/monolaurin, NA-Cysteine, CoQ10, Psyllium/Apple pectin, Ferula, Triphalia, methylation pathway support, sodium butyrate, anantamul, Blis K12, VSL#3, PB8, Proteolytic enzymes, Proferrin

freddyj
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   Posted 3/31/2013 12:10 PM (GMT -6)   
I hear you on the enemas. But let me get this straight- You got both OTC (Amazon) butyrate, and prescription butyrate? And the script was for enemas?

Are you sure youre getting the exact same stuff, and did the enemas help, then you switched and think its still helping by just taking it orally with glut? Did you take the enemas with glut?

What sort of duration of each, enema and oral are we talking so far?

Sorry to pester just hungry for details.. I want to try this, and am perplexed my Dr seemed to think it would be of no benefit to people who were passing stool, even D... Which makes no sense to me. Arent there studies showing people are helped who have colitis, yet no ostomies?

freddyj
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   Posted 3/31/2013 12:55 PM (GMT -6)   
im also reading some conflicting info on the efficacy of butyrate enemas doing anything for colitis.. some say no effect. One was beaten by placebo.

Old Mike
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   Posted 3/31/2013 1:14 PM (GMT -6)   
If butyrate does not work,believe it might have something to do with carnitine or its transport.
Old Mike

TheAnswersYouSeek
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   Posted 3/31/2013 2:09 PM (GMT -6)   
No, I didnt get prescription butyrate. My Rhematologist who found Lyme that GIs havent found in decades as well as other infections that are definitely effecting my gut, said he saw my colitis was mild-moderately active through the diagnostechs stool test. and because of my high ammonia levels and confirmed saprophytic fungi overgrowth in my gut that he wanted me to try it. It lowers ammonia and helps with UC.

I told him Id been asking docs for scripts for it for a decade.. he said I didnt need a script, go buy Sodium Butyrate specfically online.. He formulates his own supplements and said that his are held up in the fda process and he hopes to have that resolved in the next couple months but to look online, so I did.

I expressed my desire to stop enemas so we didnt discuss enemas. I clued in I could make one myself after I found a place you could buy it and realized they were easy to open capsules.

He said to start with 1000mg Sodium Butyrate + 100-200 mg of L-Glutamine, 3 times a day.. he said I may need to up my Sodium butyrate in the beginning while the gut was sealing. I should see a difference within 30 days (next appt)- I saw a difference in 2.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21658926
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1612357
www.fasebj.org/content/early/2000/12/02/fj.00-0359fje.full.pdf


Im excited about the progress and will definitely keep it up. Ill let you know in a month.

Post Edited (PathogenKiller) : 3/31/2013 1:20:28 PM (GMT-6)


aguywithuc
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   Posted 3/31/2013 7:36 PM (GMT -6)   
PathogenKiller,

I only find 600mg capsules, did you find 1000 or 500 mg ?

BodyBio/E-Lyte - Sodium Butyrate 600 mg 100 caps

Thanks

TheAnswersYouSeek
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Date Joined Jan 2013
Total Posts : 2543
   Posted 3/31/2013 7:56 PM (GMT -6)   
They had 500mg caps but it sold out. I bought the 600mg and Im taking 1 less a day.
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