Slippery Elm vs. Marshmallow Root

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pmitra0123
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2012
Total Posts : 276
   Posted 8/13/2017 2:23 AM (GMT -6)   
Does anyone know what the difference is between Slippery Elm and Marshmallow Root? It seems that both do the same thing in providing a mucilage gel to protect the linings of the intestines. Is there any difference between the two?

MarjieKay
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2017
Total Posts : 607
   Posted 8/13/2017 6:40 AM (GMT -6)   
They both sound great. here is an herbalists discussion about them both.

http://eatbeautiful.net/2016/07/03/2-new-gut-healing-ingredients-smoothies-tea-hot-chocolate-slippery-elm-marshmallow-root/

Down in the comments area (I always find little tidbits when I read those) the author says this about the herbs being the same:

"I don't think of them as interchangeable, no. They have similar benefits, though, for sure. Their mucilaginous properties are certainly similar and the herbs can be used interchangeably in that sense and for that function. But they also have differences; for instance, I would not use marshmallow root with pets. Thanks for the great question."
F, 51
2008 proctitis, 2016 UC, currently in remission
Meds: mesalamine (both ends)
Anti-inflammatory diet (IBD-AID from U of Mass)

Extras: Ginger tea, Advanced gut health probiotics, Primadophilis Reuteri, Digestive enzymes, Vitamins D, C & K, fish oil, cal/mag, Benefiber, raw potato starch, homemade kefir (water and milk both).

ElpisUnbreakable
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2015
Total Posts : 468
   Posted 8/13/2017 6:50 AM (GMT -6)   
I LOVE both. I found the marshmallow root (in me) gave the largest results.

For all the ladies - marshmallow root is one of the best things you can take if you get a UTI. I am not a doctor, but I believe it works so well because it coats the urethra (and the colon) forming a barrier to allow it to heal.

Slippery Elm did give me a little bit more D. Greasing the wheel so to speak? And I did notice more mucus while taking slippery elm but that may have been good mucous. Mucous isn't always bad.

I only took both during flares.
Remicade every 4-5 weeks.

Past medications: Asacol HD 800mg, Pred, Uceris, Imuran,
Current: Remicade, Canasa
Aloe Vera Enemas
Gluten Free low carb diet, Green tea extract
VitD, Fish Oil, Grape Seed Extract, Adrenal Fatigue, VSL #3
Hope. Lots of Hope

still_living
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 8/14/2017 11:24 PM (GMT -6)   
Slippery elm is known to contain salicylates. I believe Marshmallow root is not.

Mesalamine is chemically related to salicylic acid and aspirin. I imagine for those who respond well to those types of medications, slippery elm may be a better choice over marshmallow.
That said, some individuals are sensitive to salicylates, even allergic. In fact, those individuals may note more sensitivities to foods with salicylates, including slippery elm (more of an herb than a food, but you know...). In this case the individual might consider choosing marshmallow.

As usual, its important to remember everyone responds differently to things. Hopefully we all find what works for us.

MarjieKay
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2017
Total Posts : 607
   Posted 8/15/2017 6:35 AM (GMT -6)   
Great points, still_living ....

But doesn't marshmallow also contain salicylic acid?

"Marshmallow leaves are of a slightly different chemical makeup than the root. They contain flavonoids including kaempferol, quercetin, and diosmetin glucosides; additionally, the leaves contain the coumarin scopoletin and phenolic acids including syringic acid, caffeic acid, salicylic acid, and vanillic acid."

http://thehealthytruth.net/marshmallow.html

I am getting curious about these compounds allowing a person who IS responsive to mesalamine, like myself, to replace it with one of these? too bad I am too terrified to go there in my mind right now. Maybe at a later date!
F, 51
2008 proctitis, 2016 chronic UC
*Currently in remission*
Meds: mesalamine (both ends)
Anti-inflammatory diet (IBD-AID from U of Mass)

Extras: Ginger tea, Advanced gut health probiotics, Primadophilis Reuteri, Digestive enzymes, Vitamins D, C & K, fish oil, cal/mag, Benefiber, raw potato starch, homemade kefir (water and milk both).

MadisonLove
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 9/22/2017 5:11 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi this is for MarjieKay (hope I'm doing this right).
Here is a quote from you re. marshmallow root v. Slippery Elm: "...But they also have differences; for instance, I would not use marshmallow root with pets."

Hmmm. Just today, researching for my kitty Gomez (asthma), I read in various professional articles that marshmallow root is good for some pet ailments, and even deemed a "cure all" for many pet health issues. One veterinarian wrote an article entitled "The Top 5 herbs for Cats" touting marshmallow root as a winner for asthma and digestive problems. Here is her quote:

"Another advantage of marshmallow root is its safety and neutral flavor. Marshmallow can be used long term with no side effects or interactions with other substances. Administering herbs to cats can be difficult, but marshmallow is very mild, and even the most discerning feline will accept marshmallow extract when mixed with canned food."

So Marjie, may I ask why you convey that marshmallow root is bad for pets? I was going to start treating Gomez with it as soon as I can buy some! Thanks.
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