EKG results and question

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Talia068
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 7/28/2006 1:26 PM (GMT -7)   
 I just had an ekg and the result was not normal and the Dr. said she heard a heart murmur. Can a heart murmur give
abnormal EKG results. I copied these numbers down and wonder if anyone knows what they mean?
 
Vent rate 72
Pduration 120
Qrs duration 92
PR total 156
Qt interval 382
Qtc interval 403
Qt dispersion 54
and if I copied it right PRT axis 63/12/47
I was surpised when they just handed me my chart so I quickly copied all this down. Now the Dr. didn't seem overly concerned. I must admit that at 38 someone should have noticed a murmur sometime. I have a feeling this is a new thing. I have been majorally stressed the past few months as my hubby suffered from a heart attack at the end of April and since then I have been having some minor chest pains off and on as well as feeling the flutter in my chest. The technician didn't seem overly worried...Any insight..please.
 

Aldo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 289
   Posted 7/28/2006 10:24 PM (GMT -7)   
Did your doctor schedule an echocardiogram for you? I will look these data up when I get the time. If I really new anything about it, I could do it quickly. All those intervals and durations have normal ranges of time. Vent rate is how many times you breathed in a minute.

Rj

Aldo
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Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 289
   Posted 7/29/2006 10:47 AM (GMT -7)   
P duration 120

Qrs duration 92

PR total 156

Qt interval 382

Qtc interval 403

Qt dispersion 54

and if I copied it right PRT axis 63/12/47

-----------------------------------------

Normal for these values are:

PR interval 120-200ms

QRS duration 60-100ms

QT interval <400ms

P duration <120 ms

QTC interval <456ms

Qt dispersion should be from 30-60ms

*PRT axis 63/12/47 means that your QRS interval is in the proper axis (no deviation into an improper axis). You have 3 axis measurenents, 63,12 and 47. All are within the proper range which is -30 to +90. To understand this, you need to be familar with vector analysis. The axis is determined by which direction the electrical signals generated by your heart are travelling toward the leads of the EKG.

The QRS complex corresponds to the current that causes contraction of the left and right ventricles, which is much more forceful than that of the atria and involves more muscle mass, thus resulting in a greater ECG deflection. The duration of the QRS complex is normally less than or equal to 0.10 second.

The P wave is the electrical signature of the current that causes atrial contraction. Both the left and right atria contract simultaneously. Its relationship to QRS complexes determines the presence of a heart block.

The R wave is the initial positive or upward deflection of the QRS complex in the electrocardiogram.



*Given the methodologic problems associated with QT dispersion measurements, it is not surprising that normal values for QT dispersion have not been well defined. Generally values between 30 ms and 60 ms are considered normal. In an analysis9 of 8,455 healthy subjects from 51 studies, mean QT dispersion ranged from 11 ± 10 to 71 ± 7 ms. The weighted mean (± SD) from all of the studies was 33 ± 20 ms. Several large prospective studies have evaluated the use of QT dispersion in well-defined populations without recognized cardiac disease.

*An increased QT dispersion time is associated with ventricular tachycardias, which is the most dangerous of the tachycardias.

Talia068
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/1/2006 7:37 AM (GMT -7)   
RJ,
WOW, thanks for looking all this up. I had a echocardiogram/sonogram. The tech who really isn't supposed to say anything told me that he did see the heart murmur but everything looked ok and he so no reason to tell me "you need to be in a hospital" now he is only a tech so I need to wait for the results "officially" which will not be till the end of this week.

From what I think I am reading from your info correctly ( boy do I feel dumb :O{ ) everything on my test falls into normal range. Then why did the EKG test say T wave changes in lateral leads, changes are abnormal for age and sex. Could this be the murmur? I hate when test results take so long.

Thanks again for any and all info.
Makes the wait a bit easier.
Talia

Aldo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 289
   Posted 8/1/2006 3:17 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi, my modem is going on the blink! So I will post this info I found, QUICK. Most of what was in my former post were QUOTES, lol. I thought you knew!

I haven't even read all of the below information. If any is scary, don't believe it. I was constantly being knocked off the net, while I was searching for info.

If a computer analysis is what gave you all of these results, do NOT worry. They have give readings on me that scared the heck out of me, while in the ER and hospital. The cardio always explained that the computer was wrong. He would take his time and try to show me why. I have been in and out of hospitals for 3 years, so trust me.

Also the equipment can be out of calibration, the tech can misplace the electrodes. I don't like anything except for a 12, I say again, 12 lead EKG. If they truly find something mysterious, they will run more EKGs on you. Cheers :)

Rj

Lateral: Leads I, F, and V5-V6 are called lateral leads. Abnormality in these leads indicates pathology on the lateral, upper surface of the heart.

http://www.madsci.com/manu/ekg_st-t.htm#T%20Wave%20Abnormalities

T Wave Abnormalities

T wave abnormalities can provide added evidence to support clinical diagnosis. Except for hyperkalemia, T wave abnormality alone is not diagnostic of any particular condition. The T wave must be considered along with QRS and ST segment abnormalities. T waves will usually be abnormal in ventricular hypertrophy, left bundle branch block, chronic pericarditis, and in electrolyte abnormality.

Tall, peaked T waves occur due to hyperkalemia. If the tall T waves are seen throughout the ECG, general hyperkalemia is present. P waves will be small, PR interval short.

When typical tall, peaked T waves are seen only within a specific set of cardiac leads, it suggests impending infarction. The tall Ts are due to potassium leak through damaged membranes in the area of the infarct.

 

T Wave Categories
Tall, peaked = hyperkalemia if generalized
infarction if localized
Inverted = evolving infarction
chronic pericarditis
conduction block
ventricular hypertrophy
acute cerebral disease
other cardiac disease
Flattened = nonspecific

 

In chronic pericarditis, T waves show wide-spread inversion, not corresponding to any coronary artery distribution. General inversion of T waves can also be due to an evolving global subendocardial infarct.

Inverted T waves are seen during the evolution of myocardial infarction. The T inversion appears in the leads "looking at" the infarcted area. Several hours after an infarct, T waves begin to invert. T wave inversion may persist for months.

Left ventricular hypertrophy or strain commonly causes T wave inversion. In "strain" pattern, the ST segment slopes down to an inverted T in the leads "looking at" the affected ventricle.

Right ventricular hypertrophy or acute ventricular strain can produce changes in the right precordial leads, V1 and V2. The T wave will be inverted over right heart leads showing evidence of hypertrophy and strain.

Left bundle branch block can cause ST depression and inverted T waves in leads I, L, and V5-V6. The ST depression is usually not great. The T wave tends to be oriented opposite the QRS in LBBB.

Flat T waves can be seen in many conditions, including ischemia, cardiac scar, evolving infarction, and electrolyte abnormality (such as hypokalemia).

In acute cerebral disease, such as intracranial hemorrhage, elongated or bizzare T waves may be seen. These Ts are often biphasic or deeply and sharply inverted. The QT interval is often dramatically lengthened (0.5 to 0.7 seconds).



Talia068
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/1/2006 8:28 PM (GMT -7)   
so those numbers you posted in the top? Where did they come from? when you say quotes. From where? Now I am more confused as to where my numbers leave me. Do you understand what my numbers mean?? and are they in a normal range?

Totally confused and still really stressed out.


Talia

Aldo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 289
   Posted 8/2/2006 7:25 AM (GMT -7)   

Hi Talia,

I am sorry that I didn't post references to the information I provided. It took me over 5 hours to answer each question you had, because I wanted to make sure it was correct. I started off trying to keep links to the information, but I saw that that was going to be impossible.

I am very sorry that I have confused you and have made you even more stressed. I really had good intentions.

Here is a link to duration times, I don't think this was the source that I originally used though:

Have a great day and try not to worry,

Rj

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NUB/is_4_13/ai_n6354754/pg_2


Talia068
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 4
   Posted 8/2/2006 7:30 PM (GMT -7)   
OHH no you didn't stress me out....WOW please don't think it was you...I SOOOO appreciate your help...I think I just wanted someone to say "Hey this all looks normal relax don't worry"...lol
.WAITING for all the test results is making me nuts@@ You figure in todays world stuff could be ASAP>....

Sethshotmami
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/30/2008 11:54 AM (GMT -7)   
Ok i have a ? as well when it comes to EKG results i am so confused by mine i had 2 of the done just about a year ago...i also had a echocardiogram done and a holter monitor done
 
my first results from ekg are as follows :
vent rate 120 bpm
p duration 102ms
QRS duration 80ms
PR interval 150ms
QT interval 356ms
QTc Interval 408ms
QT Dispersopn 28ms
P-R-T- Axis 67   65   6
 
 
my 2nd ekg is as follows
vent rate 91 bpm
P Duration 102ms
QRS Duration 80ms
PR Interval 150ms
QT Interval356ms
QTc Intervals 408ms
QT Sipersiopn 28ms
P-R-T AXIS
67     65    6
 
 
my echo cardiogram came back normal an dmy holter monitor cam back as the followin
pateient as monitored for 24 hours average heart rate was 90 beats per minute  minimum was 50 and maximum is 156. minimum and maximum heart rates ocurred with sinus rythym.
Throughout the monitor period there were 8 supraventricular ectopipc beats. there were no ventricular ectopic beats . the patient  did submit a diary with this holter and reported no cardiac symptoms
impression holter monitor showed rare PACs and no PVCs  no reported symptoms

els
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 4031
   Posted 3/31/2008 4:42 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sethshotmami, Welcome to Healing Well forum. EKG's and all these type of tests are extremely confusing unless you have a medical degree or are very well versed in this topic. I'm sorry but we are not physicians nor medical professionals here so, to read or analize your results wouldnt be something we could do. My suggestion would be to seek the advise of your cardiologist or the physician who prescribed these tests to further explain these results in detail to you.

Take care

Sethshotmami
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/31/2008 4:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Ok well mine wasnt much different from what the first person posted so why am i getting blahed at for the same thing i am a bit confused here

els
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2005
Total Posts : 4031
   Posted 3/31/2008 6:10 PM (GMT -7)   
These people personally went through many of these procedures, they were not offering medical advice or suggestions. You are not getting "blahed" here, just the people who originally were posting on this thread do not post here anylonger and havent for almost a yr and half.

I am sorry if you feel you are being turned away, please dont feel that way...this isnt my intent at all. I do hope someone can come along and help you with finding some facts on EKG's and how to figure out what your tests mean. We do just advocate that your physician is always a best point of referance. However, I do understand that at times this is not always a persons best option.

Sethshotmami
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 3/31/2008 6:14 PM (GMT -7)   
I understand what youa re saying i am srry when i read te articles i googled it and they came up i paid no attention to the dates .....well they are there my doctor said everything was normal it was just me looking at the papers almost a year later na dwondering about few thinsg was al though maybe someone might understand it is all im not going to call my doctor after a yea r and say hey whats this lol

bill3911
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 10/12/2008 10:13 AM (GMT -7)   
I would love to find the reference for what is normal and abnormal for P-R-T AXIS.

Johnny Knee Bone
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 11/1/2008 11:19 AM (GMT -7)   
its too bad this is an old thread but never count on EKG results . Doctors don't know what to say when I tell them to go check my charts ... I had 1 xray and 2 EKGs before my heart attack . EKGs are useless and provide zero information other than to tell you your heart is beating they should be banned .

Pinks
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 131
   Posted 11/2/2008 5:53 AM (GMT -7)   
Hah, Johnny Knee Bone is right. My dad had a a normal ekg result a few days before he passed away and he was told his heart was fine.
Only the day before he passed away did doctors at the hospital told us he must've had ischemic heart disease for very long due to the severe blockages.
After reading up on heart attack symptoms, I realised he also must've had several heart attacks before the ekg. It's not very effective unless the person is really having a heart attack when the ekg is being done. Other than that, I don't trust ekgs.

Johnny Knee Bone
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 11/2/2008 9:11 AM (GMT -7)   
thanks Pinks you know folks I really don't know if there is real valuable information on EKGs or not but I have no choice but to believe they are useless .toying with numbers and statistics dreamed up out of simple timed heartbeats is just foolish nonsense and trying to make use of something which seems valuable ,but really isn't .

A stress test (treadmill) is supposed to be even more accurate and I can't find anything which says they are more than 63% accurate and the big problem is your blood pressure is different when you are lying down because everything is more balanced due to an important thing called GRAVITY it is also going to be different standing on your head or if you are tilted in any way . The human heart speeds up and slows down with a continuously changing amount of pressure so much it is impossible to tell what is going on unless it is, like Pinks says, OBVIOUS . I'll argue the point wth the best of them afterall if there is room for excuses like what happened to Pinks father and also what happened to me what really can anyone say ...Not much really , because if excuses like ischemia for a long time after the fact is told to you then really the EKG was actually a killer rather than a useful tool .

If it inhibits the process of diagnosis then it should be labeled as very dangerous therefore there is probably no reason to question why I think they should be banned . If you give medical proffessionals a tool to assist them you embed confidence that the tool has a degree of value and it will suffice is which obviously can and will remove the process of proper health care .Relying on it is a medical proffessional mistake... a very big one .

greenhope
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 113
   Posted 11/2/2008 10:37 AM (GMT -7)   
I completely agree with you both, Pinks and Johnny Knee Bone. My heart has been slowly deteriorating in the past year due to a hole in my heart - PFO - that caused serious complications (I just had it closed on 10/24/08 and feel I am on the road to recovery). During this time I have had about 6 EKG's done and guess what? They were ALL normal! I agree Johnny Knee Bone that it is dangerous and irresponsible to use these tests as a diagnostic tool. It gives both the doctor and the patient a false sense of confidence. After the second one, I realized it was a very unreliable test and stopped taking the results seriously.

Good luck to everyone on their quest for answers to their symptoms.

Greenhope
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