PROBLEMS AFTER CARDIAC ABLATION - Part 1 of 2

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RHYTHMRN
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 9/23/2006 6:32 PM (GMT -6)   
HI nono ,
I AM NEW TO THIS FORUM.  I AM 39YO FEMALE.  HAD 2 ABLATIONS FOR AVNRT (FORM OF SVT). FIRST WAS UNSUCCESSFUL - SVT BACK WITHIN 4 WEEKS AND WORSE THAN EVER.  HAD SECOND ABLATION 6/22/06.  AFTER SECOND ABLATION WAS HAVING SINUS TACH - UP TO 160BPM FROM MIN. EXERTION.  ENDED UP BACK IN HOSP. DIAGNOSED WITH "INAPPROPRIATE SINUS TACH." AND PUT BACK ON BETA BLOCKERS.  about A WEEK AFTER GOING BACK ON BETA BLOCKERS, STARTED HAVING FREQUENT SKIPPED BEATS - MONITOR SHOWED PREMATURE JUNCTIONAL CONTRACTIONS AND PACS/PVCS.  I ALSO STILL HAVE NO TOLERANCE FOR ACTIVITY AND GET SHORT OF BREATH EASILY. I HAVE HAD THE SKIPPED BEATS NON STOP EVER SINCE-SOMETIMES 2/3 A MINUTE.  GETTING VERY ANXIOUS AND DISGUSTED.  HAD CARDIAC CATH. ON 8/29/06 AND ALL CLEAR.  IF ANYONE ELSE HAS HAD OR IS HAVING SIMILAR PROBLEMS POST ABLATION PLEASE RESPOND..THANK YOU.
eyes  RHYTHMRN

Post Edited By Moderator (stkitt) : 3/19/2013 1:13:01 PM (GMT-6)


Juliette1
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 72
   Posted 9/26/2006 5:11 AM (GMT -6)   

Hi, I don't know if my story will be of interest to you?

I have had 3 ablations and am waiting for a fourth. I was originally diagnosed with AVNRT. After the first ablation this returned after a couple of weeks so I was put back on Flecainide and on the waiting list for a second ablation.(I don't tolerate betablockers well). It was clear while I was having this second ablation done that it wasn't going to work so I carried on with Flecainide and waited for a third ablation. By this time I had what was described as 'multi-focal left atrial tachycardia' too.A few months after this second try while I was waiting for the third and still taking Flecainide I had an episode of coupled beats and atrial fibrillation and had to go to hospital overnight for Adenosine. This got my heartrate back to 'normal', ie no coupled beats and AF but still having the other problems. I never really got an explanation as to why this happened, and it never happened again.The third ablation showed that the AVNRT had gone, but found left septal tachycardia, so I am waiting for a fourth ablation!  

I'm so sorry that your ablations haven't worked well, it's so stressful and frustrating. Like you, I am limited in what I can do now - I'm not working at the moment - and being short of breath is very tiring. Are you seeing your doctors again? It's hard to have to keep pushing for treatment when you feel weak and I hope they are not trying to fob you off because your cath was all clear. Do they just expect you to put up with the skipped beats? Please do let us know how things are going for you.
 
Juliette

RHYTHMRN
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 9/26/2006 9:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Juliette,
Thanks for your reply.  Could you please tell me when your ablations were done??  Is your fourth ablation scheduled??  Are they able to explain why you are tired and short of breath?? My cardio. did the cath. last month because I think he doesn't know what else to do with me.  My EP says it could be from the skipped beats or maybe I am just deconditioned from lack of exercise.  Funny how I instantly became deconditioned immediately after the second ablation.  I am sure at this point now I am deconditioned considering I have not been able to do normal activities for 3 months. I also am barely working.  I am fortunate in that I am part of a family owned business otherwise I would be remortgaging my house! I am also experiencing some anxiety and depression like I have never felt before - I just want to feel normal again.  Are you also having skipped beats often??
I see my cardio and EP this week and I hope to get some answers.  You must be as frustrated as I am.  Please keep in touch and take care..

Amby
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 53
   Posted 9/26/2006 11:11 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi,

What is AVNRT? I can't seem to figure out what the abbr. stands for. :) Sorry.
Amber
 
Living with IBS,
Migraines & Tachycardia
 


Juliette1
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 72
   Posted 9/26/2006 12:38 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi there

I had the ablations over the last 4 years. The reason for the long gaps is because I live in Britain, so you get put on waiting lists and there are problems getting new technology. I don't know when the next one will be, I think it should be before the end of the year - you don't always get much notice. As for the fatigue and shortness of breath, well, I don't remember anyone really telling me what causes it. I just assumed that I may not always get enough oxygen circulating when I'm not pumping properly. Hope that doesn't sound too stupid! I have really bad tachycardia when I wake up because of the changes that occur when everything kicks in on waking, and bouts of breathlessness and tachycardia during the day, but those are never more than 130 BPM. Fortunately, I don't get skipped beats. I have to lay down for an hour or two after I wake up. It is strange how one puts up with all this and accepts it as feeling 'deconditioned', as you said. My GP really annoys me sometimes, he says how ill I am/how I should behave re. exercise is determined by what my quality of life is like; if its good then that's all OK then. How do I know how good it is? I've forgotten how I felt before this all started! Almost any aerobic exercise puts my heartrate up, including vacuuming and going upstairs. I have also found that as time has gone on I've paid less attention to the detail I've been told about my condition. I've just gone along with things lately. I really do hope that you get some definite answers soon. There is a lot of information on this site about tachycardia, perhaps it would help you to formulate some questions to ask your cardio and EP? (I hope that doesn't sound patronising). Thanks for your interest, take care,

Juliette


Post Edited (Juliette1) : 9/26/2006 1:37:08 PM (GMT-6)


RHYTHMRN
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 9/26/2006 4:46 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Juliette,
Thanks for the reply. I am from the US Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania and had the procedure done at a large teaching hospital which is one of the best in the country. Fortunately there isn't really any delays in our private healthcare system. When my first ablation didn't work, I say the Ep on a Monday and was in the hospital that thursday having the procedure. I thought having two was frustrating, I hope you have luck with your fourth. One thing I wanted to mention - for the first 4 weeks after the 2nd ablation I had the tachycardia really bad and only had a few skipped beats here and there. When they put me back on the beta blockers, the tachy. subsided and I went straight into the skipped beats - maybe the tachy masks the skipped beats?? Also the stairs really get me, too - sometimes I have to stop half way up and rest. Cleaning and vaccuming can do it to. I am only 39 and I feel like I am 90. I see these commercials on television with seniors exercising, etc. and I think boy I wish I could do that! My quality of life has really plummeted and I am desperately seeking answers. Please keep in touch and thanks again for the reply.
Take care..............

RHYTHMRN
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 9/26/2006 5:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Amby,
AVNRT is the abbreviation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. It is a form of SVT (supraventricular tachycardia) where there is an abnormal pathway that allows the the natural circuit to rebound causing a high heartrate. Hope that helps - Take care....

Amby
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2006
Total Posts : 53
   Posted 9/26/2006 5:06 PM (GMT -6)   
Yes thank you Rhythmrn.

The more info I can learn the better. :)
Amber
 
Living with IBS,
Migraines & Tachycardia
 


PaulB
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 9/26/2006 6:21 PM (GMT -6)   
Dear RYTHMRN,

Sorry to hear about your problems. I just had my first ablation about 6 weeks ago - and have been out of sinus rhythm ever since. I used to get tired and short of breath with heavy exertion; now I get tired and short of breath with chest pain. I'm going to give it another try at a better hospital in a few weeks.

Anyway, I have a comment about depression/anxiety. For the last 12 years I have been on increasing doses of beta blockers - and fighting depression and anxiety the whole time. It got so that I thought it was hereditary and just part of life. I recently came off the beta blocker (Betapace 480mg daily) immediately after my ablation. To my surprise, the depression lifted for the first time in years! My wife was overjoyed that her couch-pototo husband came flying off the couch.

Of course, later the amiodorone and metaprolol they put me on took hold and I'm back in the doldrums.

The point of this rambling is that beta blockers have nasty side effects. Get off them if you can (heart permitting).

I plan to get the second ablation at Emory U in Atlanta. If I hear of anthing there that might apply to you I'll let you know.

Good luck and God bless,

RHYTHMRN
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 9/26/2006 7:05 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Paul B.,

Thanks for your reply. What arrythmia was your ablation for?? You said you have not been in sinus rhythm - what arrythmia are you having now?? As for the beta-blockers, that was part of my master plan! I had suffered with SVT since I was a teenager and been on beta-blockers for 25 years. I figured I could get off of the medication and never have to worry about the awful SVT again. Now I am back on beta-blockers, short of breath, having constant PACs and depressed and anxious. My decision to have the second ablation was a no brainer though since the first ablation pretty much put me into daily episodes of SVT! Keep in touch and take care..............

RHYTHMRN
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 10/17/2006 8:33 PM (GMT -6)   

nono  Hi,

Has anyone out there had an ablation and still having problems?? Would like to hear from you.......


questions...
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 11/15/2008 11:06 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello :)  My name is Jen and my husband just had an ablation about 3 weeks ago that was unsuccessful because once they got in the heart to map where the extra electrical impulses were, they found out his is at a rare location, on the outside of the heart in an area that is hard to reach near a major artery.....doc said he has a rare form of WPW. So, as we are now scratching our heads wondering and worrying where to go from here, my husband is having waaay more frequent bouts of SVT and these ones he can no longer stop himself, instead we keep trucking up to the ER to get some adenosine. Anyway, I wanted to reply to your post because my husband definately seemed worse for the wear, and when I brought it up to our electrophysiologist at the followup, he rolled his eyes and summed it up to being psychological, which was very unsettling! Then , I found this chat forum where many people have said that their docs told them that it could be worse for a while while the muscle basically heals up from the trauma of the ablation procedure, which made me feel soooo much better and at the same time makes me question my doctor......he acted like there was no way. Anyway, I guess what I am trying to say is that I keep reading time and time again that after an ablation it is possible (even for people that underwent a SUCCESSFUL procedure) to feel worse for anywhere from a few weeks to a few months after the ablation procedure. Hope that helps, and if anyone happens to read this and has any advise as to where we should go from here or if anyone has heard of this odd pathway location condition, please let me know! We're totally lost! Thanks, Jen and Vic from Florida

NLane79
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/29/2010 7:27 PM (GMT -6)   
I have had 2 ablation for atrial fib and still have trouble with it. Any type of stress, worry, or illness can cause my atrial fib to occur. They do not believe that a third ablation will help me. I am currently on Rythmol and Toprol. I take extra pills to any flare ups that I might have. I also have hypertrophic cardiomyapathy, so it makes things more difficult for them to always treat with me.

My husband has had 2 ablations for ventricular bigeminy. He is doing much better. He still has occasional problems, but not too bad. He also has, what they think is, sarcoidosis in his lungs. I know that at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota they can do an ablation on the outside of the heart. They had started to do that on my husband during his second ablation, but discovered that they did not need to. I think that would be worth looking into.

I hope that this has help in some way. Good luck to you all.

catabpat
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 11/14/2010 10:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello everyone,
New member here, and just gone through catheter ablation in Aug.
I've got to say it took me quite abit of time, even now, to feel like myself again.
Had 2 EKGs, chest x-ray, and Holter monitor done, because of shortness of breath, dizziness, dull left arm numbness and palpatations, 1 1/2 mos. ago...all were negative! Very frustrating and confusing because why am I getting these symptoms but my tests were ok?
Like many of you who went through ablation for afib, the info says you should be back to your old self in a week! I'm sure the caveat applies here...each individual may vary...but come on, normal life in a week?
I'll see my cardiologist for our 3 mo. follow-up, in 2 weeks.
Anyone who went through successful catheter ablation, please post...Thank you, c. 

gauteng
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 1/20/2011 3:20 PM (GMT -6)   
HI, i just had an ablation done Last thursday. I was kicked out of hospital on the Friday Started having issues on Saturday with loss of strength could not talk properly, called my dr who siad not to worry go get heparin shots.. ( took coumadin instead) he did tell me to go to three ameoderone instead of 1. saturday night I slept well. Sunday I got up and felt like crap had no interest in moving and when i tried could no called the Dr twice was told to go the hospital which i eventually did with i nice little convulsive heart failure going on I spent that night in a heart rate of 100 to 14o went into rhyhm and then i got hit like a railroad track 140 plus full afib attack really concerning

AVNRT
New Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 3/18/2011 9:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Dear Gauteng:

Sounds like you need to switch to a new electro cardiologist. Search under your states medical licensing board to check your doctor's or new potential doctor's qualifications. Also check the US News and World Report top hospitals in the USA list for heart and heart surgery for 2010-2011 at: http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings

I had my first ablation for a racing heart aka Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry Tachycardia (AVNRT), a form of Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia (PSVT), right after Christmas 2009 at age 45. The surgery was one of the easiest surgeries really that I've had yet, and was done under general anesthesia. They operated for 8 hours and I stayed one night in the hospital after being in the intensive care unit for 6 or so hours. I felt great and actually "normal" for the first time in years, almost immediately. Recovery time was a few days before I was up and around again, and a couple of weeks before I was lifting stuff. But it only lasted for a few months and then the SVT started to come back slowly but surely -- which sucked.

I am scheduled for a second cardiac ablation the first week of April 2011 at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla again (UCLA, MAYO Clinic, are also top notch). Unfortunately I can't tolerate a lot of medications, especially beta blockers. So I take Verapamil each night and if my symptoms are bad I take it again in the morning (but that wipes me out for the day). My electro cardiologist says that the little nerve endings can grow back in the ablated areas and cause the problem to reoccur, or it can be new areas. He won't know for sure what the cause is this time until I have the ablation done again. I've done all the tests, and worn the monitor round the clock too.

I also wear a watch that monitors my heart rate which helps me keep on eye on the problem ($45 at the pharmacy). The other day it was 176 bpm while I was sitting down. My racing heart is triggered by any kind of movement, including just rolling over in bed at night. Excedrin, caffeine from tea/coffee, even alcohol increases my heart rate. I feel like I'm running a marathon constantly, and often out of breath, dizzy, and have chest pain. Looking forward to my 2nd ablation and hoping it will take care of the problem once and for all, but understand the doctor can only take baby steps. If they burn too much of the affected area, it can permanently lower your heart rate and then you'd need a pacemaker -- which I'm way too young for. I do understand that I might need a 3rd ablation though. One step at a time though.

Anyhow,, wishing everyone the best with their heart issues. I feel for you, and understand your frustration and pain. I think it really helps to go to the best possible doctor and hospital that you can get through your insurance, and to do your homework before committing to a doctor/hospital. Your heart is just too important. Don't settle for mediocre health care.

squarewheel
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 4/16/2011 5:28 PM (GMT -6)   
HI, i am a new member, I decided to join after reading this thread.
I had an ablation 2 weeks ago and exactly 1 week following the ablation I was blue lighted back into hospital after going into sustained atrial tachycardia. My symptoms bagan just over 5 years ago when I was 28yrs old. I dont smoke & I worked out regularly, after 6 months of feeling unwell following a bout of the flu I was diagmosed with myocardi*** & Dilated Cardiomyopathy. 1.5yrs later after several fainting episodes I was fitted with a reveal device, two weeks after it was fitted it showed that I had episodes of non sustained VT. I was put on several meds and closely monitored.
The monitoring continued despite several repeat episodes of NSVT until my cardio decided I should have an ablation. During the 5hr op they were unable to induce VT but after inserting catheters 5 & 6 into the atria they induced sustained AT!? they ablated twice, but after the attack last monday they have said they need to redo the op on 6th May!
I feel devistated that not only did it not work but that it has left me feeling worse than before. It is nice to find others who understand the emotional rollercoaster but sad to see there are so many in a similar situation.
My heart goes out to anyone who has been through this or a similar situation. Easier said than done, but, Don't it get the better of you!

Mother of SVT
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2011
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 7/27/2011 6:26 AM (GMT -6)   
My daughter had her first ablation procedure and is now having a very hard time sleeping. Is anyone else experiencing this? Any remedies?

REDNECKSOLDIER
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 8/2/2011 5:00 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello everyone, I am a soldier with the US Army 29 years old. I started having issues with SVT though I had no idea what that was about 5 years ago. I did have some issues with having tachycardia episodes lasting over 3 hours but I never complained about them and would always talk myself out of reporting to the hospital. I went to my primary care doctor about two months ago and told him about the problems I had been having and he decided to do an EKG. During the EKG he noticed some irregularities that made him reffer me to a cardiologist and the cardiologist told me he knew it was SVT so he in turn sent me to a EP. My EP pretty much wanted to go right in and do the EP study and ablation and convinced me to go along with it, I was told it was routine, not to worry, and I would be back to normal right away without having to think about SVT again. I thought that sounded GREAT!
Prior to the ablation proceedure I was only having very occasional problems with the last major episode lasting about 5 hours but it had been about 2 years since that had happened. Well, my EP said he was pretty sure it was WPW, after the ablation he said that it turned out not to be WPW but that (forgive my lack of technical knoledge here) the main electrical pathway in my heart had an extra pathway attached to it. He said the extra pathway did cause the SVT so he ablated and had to shock my heart twice during the ablation.
The week after I felt just a little weird but otherwise very normal and I rapidly began to get back to mostly normal activities, taking it easo on the exercise though. Before the ablation I was running at least 3 miles per day 5 days per week and working long hours in the summer heat. Exactly one week after the ablation proceedure I was hit with a bad episode of tachycardia and I took myself to the hospital, I was diagnosed this time with inappropriate sinus tachycardia which my EP said was a short term result of the proceedure, not abnormal for the first few weeks after an ablation. With this news I was confident once more and started getting back into the exercise routine, one day while I was only jogging I was hit again with another episode, my EP told me I didnt have to go back to the hospital if this happened again so I tried to wait for my heart to slow down but after 40 minutes or so I took a nadolol 20mg that was able to slow it back down.
After this occurance I still had episodes of skipped heartbeats and paliptations lasting hours at a time and have consistently found that I seem to no longer be able to handle being in the heat without feeling short of breath and I am frequently having episodes of a fatigue I am not familiar with.
My last visit to my EP he put me on a daily dose (just 20 Mg of nadolol) and told me to eat a diet high in salt content (he actually told me to try and consume 15,000 Mg of salt daily which I do not think I can do). I also do not think that it is safe to eat that much salt. He did not provide me much more information past this just that we would find a treatment regimine that would work.
Overall, I do not feel the same as I did prior to the proceedure, I actually feel as though I have aged 10 years, to go from daily rigorous cardiovascular exercise, no issue to heat exposure, and having a great personal drive to not being able to run, getting constantly easily exausted and overall not feeling well, is greatly disappointing. And there seems to be no information about this online.

azcoyote
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 8/6/2011 12:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear Mr. Rednecksoldier,

So sorry your having this problem with your heart's conducting system at such a young period in your life. I am NOT an expert in cardiac ablations but since I had an ablation on June 10th of this year, I too am having a rocky recovery and want you to know that in the large majority of cases (above 90th percentile) patients do recover arrhythmia-free or at least are relieved of the arrhythmias that they had...at least that's what the medical literature wants us to believe. One big problem for me is that I am a medical doctor (used to practice anesthesiology, so I'm not giving advice as a doc or a cardiologist, but I'm merely sharing with you what I have read as a patient and am relating my own experiences) and it's hard to be a doc when you're sick and vice versa.

I had four areas in my heart ablated...two by radio-frequency destruction and two by cold catheter ablation. I have had episodes of SVT (supra-ventricular tachycardia) since 1993 when I caught a "cold" virus from my then-3 year old son. It settled in my upper heart chambers and scarred my conducting system, I have been on Atenolol and more recently Metoprolol since '93 and can agree that it has put a damper on my lifestyle. Flecanide made me miserably nauseous so I had to stop it. My cardiologist felt for years that ablations were not perfected and told me to wait.

Yesterday was a real disappointment for me...my first post-ablation arrhythmia..heart rate went to 130. I waited an hour in hopes this was just going to go away by itself, and that it was just my heart being sensitive to to the absence of beta-blockers ( I was weaned "successfully" from them 2 weeks ago) but I woke up this morning short of breath and with a heart rate of 160..clearly more than a mere sensitivity...I still have a place that needs ablating. So I'm back on atenolol and I'm using a non-looping cardiac monitor for a month to catch these arrythmias and record them so that my EP guy can determine, by the shape (morphology) of the P-wave (of the EKG), exactly where in the atria this bugger is coming from.

I guess my message is: BE PATIENT! This is a challenging and relatively new area of medicine. With patience, you should ultimately get relief from your arrhythmias and be able to ditch the beta blockers. It's better to have the doc go gingerly the first time and go back a second time. If they get too aggressive and overheat the tissue, you can wind up with bad side effects. One thing I want to share with the whole forum is that when indicated, your EP guy can use cold ablation which kills the troublesome cells by freezing. In some areas, like the pulmonary veins, this is thought to reduce the chances of contractures and narrowing of the pulmonary vein's lumen (opening). Freezing is thought to preserve the stroma of the vascular and cardiac tissue (the support structure) which is supposed to reduce the scarring effect. The repair cells can use this as a scaffolding so the tissues retain their strength. The atrial wall is pretty darn thin, so lots of heat in one place can result in complications...that's why EPs are trained to go gingerly, even if it means a second procedure. To use language you might understand, going back a second time is like a field marshal or general executing a brilliant retreat, allowing his troops to resupply and his supply lines to shorten before a counter-attack....men of towering military intellect like Rommel in North Africa and von Manstein in Russia would be good military examples... Once your doc narrows down the offending locus of cells causing the trouble, he can nuke them once and for all with careful rules of engagement!

The naldolol may be limiting your exercise and heat tolerance which is expected. Remember, it takes about three months for complete healing in most cases. Primary healing occurs in the first month, and by the third month, the tissues re-heal...they break down a little and "remodel" which can play havoc and even result in an unexpected arrhythmia until complete healing has occurred. That's why I would not recommend having a second or third ablation right away after the first. Give the heart's endothelium (internal lining cells) a chance to re-grow and re-coat the inside of the heart and blood vessels and allow the heart to "declare itself". If after the healing is complete, you have breakthrough arrhythmia, then a re-ablation makes sense. This is what I have heard and read in the literature. But try not to let it get you down...there IS light at the other end of the tunnel.
One last word: Drugs like Metoprolol cross the blood-brain barrier. Atenolol apparently does not. I'm not sure about naldolol...but these beta blockers can affect the brain and make you somewhat depressed. I found also in my case that taking ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil) really reduced the inflammation and that I had fewer immediate post-ablation arrhythmias when I stayed on it around the clock. You may react differently. I agree that there are few details on the Internet that explain what to expect during healing. And everyone's body is different and heals differently...I hope that I've filled in some of the " knowledge gaps" by relating my own experiences as a patient. Being a doctor is hard...but being a patient is NO EASIER!

Michigoose
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 8/9/2011 7:43 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi--
I usually post on the UC forum, but I also had an ablation last January for a-flutter and A-fib. Since then, things have been pretty good--with occasional extra beats, or a little flutter--not identified really --even a 14-day event monitor didn't catch anything. The doc put me on 80 mg of sotalol and I just dragged around for a while, but I guess I've adjusted to it and I have a little more energy now. The problem is my heart rate hangs around the mid fiftys and often goes into the mid-40s. When I questioned the doc he said that didn't worry him and that I could drop the sotalol
beta-blocker if I wanted to try that. When I did, I got some arrhythmias , so went back on the beta-blocker. He said I was on the minimum dose anyway.

Has anyone else had the problem of too low a heart rate on beta-blockers? What's too low? Is a pacer called for here? Before the ablation the Holter monitor showed my ate at the mid 30s in the middle of the night!!

Thanks for any help you can give.

Michigoose

azcoyote
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2011
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 8/9/2011 10:30 PM (GMT -6)   
If I was taking a beta blocker and it caused my heart rate to drop into the 40's and even 30's while I was asleep, I would BACK OFF on the beta blocker. A persistent heart rate of 30-something is essentially not thought to be compatible with life. Physiologists teach that the heart's ventricles commonly have an inherent myogenic capability of producing a heart beat of 60 per minute without input from the atria, however, it's best NEVER to rely upon this physiological concept. Overdosing with a beta blocker can cause first-degree AV block, which in most cases, when not combined with bundle branch blockade or other disorders of rate, rhythm, or axis, is not thought to be life threatening when brought to the attention of a physician for treatment. Glucagon can be administered, but this can exacerbate your arrhythmias.

You cardiologist may recommend a separate anti-arrhythmic drug that will not contribute to worsening of the blockade. I believe that beta blockers are not thought to produce other degrees of AV blockade...second or third degree, for example. Disease of the AV node and other conditions (viral sequelae, etc) are thought to contribute here.

In short, a heart rate of 30 really cannot be allowed to go untreated....it may be time for a pacemaker...

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 8/11/2011 9:30 AM (GMT -6)   
 
A heartrate in the 30s calls for the immediate attention of your physician.  Please do call you Dr. right away as I am sure he will want to see you or advice you re your medications.  If a medicine is causing heart block, the disorder may go away if the medicine is stopped or the dosage is lowered.

Any content found in this forum is solely made available for informational purposes only. It is in no way intended to form as any type of substitute nor supplement for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or medication.

Kindly,

Kitt


~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic, Osteoarthritis, GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.
www.healingwell.com

"If you can't change the world, change your world"

Michigoose
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 64
   Posted 8/11/2011 11:38 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the replies--

What I meant was my rate dropped into the mid 30's before I was on the beta blocker and before abalation. As far as I know, now it is dropping into the high to mid 40's when I'm up and about. Yes, I'm concerned and will bring this up with the cardio doc as soon as I can get in again. I told him about it before and he just passed it off saying "plenty of people are walking around with a rate in the high 40's and are ok. Well, sure, if you are a runner and are in tip top shape, that kind of heart rate is normal, but not for a 73 yr old who has been forced into a somewhat sedentary life at the moment. Thanks for the validation.

Will follow up on this.

Again, thanks.

Michigoose

stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 8/11/2011 6:23 PM (GMT -6)   
Michigoose
 
You are very welcome and very wise to question your low heartrate.  I agree with you  - a heartrate below 50 is considered bradycardia.  Remind him you are not many people; you are one very important individual to you and your family and now to us also.  :-)
 
Kindly,
Kitt
~~Kitt~~
Moderator: Anxiety/Panic, Osteoarthritis, GERD/Heartburn and Heart/Cardiovascular Disease.
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