anyone tried fasting?

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theacidrefluxman
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Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 739
   Posted 10/15/2009 8:10 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi all,
 
Not sure how many here have experience with fasting. Ive never done it but have always been interested, and am wondering if it may help GERD.
 
I am going to give it a shot in the near future and will let everyone know if it makes any difference in my case on this thread.
 
Anyone else tried fasting? I am thinking fasting 3-5 days twice a month may help...although my heart tells me whenever I eat something my stomach needs to produce acid to consume it and that will cause heartburn...
 
regardless I am gonna give it a shot, has anyone else?

babygirl10150
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Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 639
   Posted 10/15/2009 9:13 PM (GMT -6)   
If you try it, let me know. I can't go a few hours without eating or the acid gets really bad!

AcidStorm
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 17
   Posted Yesterday 2:28 AM (GMT -6)   
As this is all new to me, I skipped lunch and dinner today because of the pain, and I developed a full feeling in my stomach where I wanted to vomit something up, but it never came. A glass of water would calm it a bit, but I still had some discomfort without any food. I imagine it would be the same if I skipped for a second day, but I would consider it if I could have a few days of relief without pain.

What I want to know is WHY the evening (not sleep or laying down) is such a problem, even when I skip dinner. Does the motility of the stomach just shut down at a certain time? Or does the LES get tired from a long day?

It seems to me there are two issues: (1) too much acid production and (2) stomach pushing acid and food up into the esophagus.

stkitt
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Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted Yesterday 8:03 AM (GMT -6)   
Acid Storm  said...
What I want to know is WHY the evening (not sleep or laying down) is such a problem, even when I skip dinner. Does the motility of the stomach just shut down at a certain time? Or does the LES get tired from a long day?

It seems to me there are two issues: (1) too much acid production and (2) stomach pushing acid and food up into the esophagus.
Good Morning,
 
These are some technical questions that may be best addressed with your GI specialist.  :-)
 
However re fasting, I would not choose this method for dealing with your GERD unless you are closely supervised by your physician.  Just my 2 cents worth today.
 
Take care and stick with us.
 
Kitt
 

Kitt,
Moderator: Osteoarthritis, GERD/Heartburn  &
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theacidrefluxman
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Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 739
   Posted Yesterday 10:24 AM (GMT -6)   
acidstorm,

looks like we are different. the best part of my day is from about 8pm until 8am. i never eat between these times, more or less, and usually im done around 7pm. I wake up and jog usually and still no problems...mine usually come when eating, not when i dont eat.

from the research ive done fasting is considered not good for GERD because after about 14 hours w/o food your stomach produces a LOT of acid, and it gets bad.

However a couple websites report that fasting can help GERD...like a 3 day juice fast...

No clear cut answer it seems, but generally its considered a bad idea. I am going to try it within a month hopefully and ill let you know what happens. But as I said, with me, when I dont eat my GERD gets better! One of these days I stayed at a friends place and ate dinner at 7pm, but didnt sleep until 3am since the guy has a schedule like that and its a one room place. I slept on a flat floor and had no GERD in the night, can you believe it!

speden
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 175
   Posted Yesterday 10:56 AM (GMT -6)   
refluxman,

You're lucky you can get away with jogging. Sometimes running is not well tolerated by GERD sufferers. Hard exercise makes the esophagus and LES valve relax, and combined with the up and down/abdominal squeezing of running, it can throw some acid up into the esophagus.

Maybe you have the type of GERD where your LES valve only opens when your stomach is distended by food, and it is closed when your stomach is empty. That might explain why you only get problems when eating.

speden

theacidrefluxman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 739
   Posted Today 10:25 AM (GMT -6)   
cool, thanks for the info speden.

all i know is i would get GERD if I didnt jog before eating breakfast, which puts about 10 hours between my jogging and my last meal...

rboater7
New Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 1
   Posted Today 8:03 PM (GMT -6)   
I've been thinking about trying fasting myself. I used to fast occasionally a long time ago, and it seemed as though my stomach would always shrink a little, and things would basically tighten up around my gut. And I'm thinking that might not be a bad thing. I had always heard that fasting gave your digestive organs a rest and an opportunity to heal. I wonder about the acid production though.

Having said that, fasting can do more harm than good if not done properly. The biggest risk seems to be setting up a sense of deprivation that results in overeating or bingeing at the conclusion of the fast. I think if you are going to fast you need to have a precise plan for the transition from fasting to normal eating again. For instance if you're going to fast for three days, plan for a gradual return to a normal diet for three more days. Therefore, it's a six day process (and discipline), not just three. It's better to do a shorter fast with a good transition than a longer one that leads to bingeing that ultimately does more harm than good. Other alternatives are doing some sort of a simplified diet, such as just brown rice, steamed vegetables, fruits or juices. The book 'Healing with Whole Foods' by Paul Pitchford has an excellent section on therapeutic fasting.

In general making gradual changes in diet (and meal size) over time may be more effective than the all or nothing approach of fasting. Fasting can be a powerful tool, but it can be difficult and somewhat dangerous in terms of setting up cycles of deprivation and overindulgence that can lead to disordered eating. The author Geneen Roth always says 'behind every period of deprivation lurks an equal and opposite binge.' There are some people who can fast successfully and some for whom a more gradual approach is better.

I hope this helps. Good luck.

guddan
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2012
Total Posts : 32
   Posted 6/16/2012 8:53 AM (GMT -6)   
On basis of what I have read, mind/brain signals stomach to start producing acid on basis of few things like smell of food, hunger needs or pre-defined times like lunch/dinner.
A complete fasting in this case would be like inviting acid reflux episode. I would suggest to start eating less but at the same time of the day everyday. Slowly, the stomach will strunk /compress and will accostusmed to less food. Another idea is to eat less but drink water before to make stomach nearly full.
It takes stomach to empty contents 3-4 hrs to small intestine. Hopefully if small intestine valve is functionaling correct, it won't come back to stomach. Hence its advisable to sleep or do joging after 3-4 hrs of eating. Also helps is keeping upper structure of your body /posture perfectely verticle after eating for 3-4 hrs.
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