weight lifting and hiatus Hernia

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

aquapura
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 12/30/2011 11:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Everyone,

I'm a new member on this forum and came to talk to people who may be in a similar situation as me. I'm 28 years old and weightlifting is a huge part of my life. I developed a sore stomach around 3 weeks ago and have been to the doctor several times. The time time i was given Zantac to take for 1 month. I ended up going back because this wasn't really helping and given a more power PPI called somac. I am still however getting a burning sensation at night. I got checked for H Pylori which i was hoping would be positive so i could be treated and knew the problem ( i know that sounds stupid) It was negative however. I went back to the doctor and i'm scheduled for a Endoscopy for next week. I've been reading lots on the internet which has caused me a lot of anxiety especially reading about hiatus hernias. I am worried (although i'm not sure) that i have this as it matches all the symptoms i have and because i'm not a drinker, smoker or overweight.

Anyway my question is if it is a H hernia. What are my options? I don't want to give up weightlifting (bench press, deadlifts and squats) and i don't want to keep taking medication. I understand taht leaves me only with surgery which i am also opposed to. Has anyone continued weight training with GERD or that has a H hernia?

Are there natural ways? Any help would be greatly appreciated i'm quite depressed and worried about this whole thing.

Thanks

opnwhl4
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 4814
   Posted 12/30/2011 11:46 PM (GMT -6)   
aquapura-

Welcome to Healing Well. Most people have a hiatal hernia of some sort. Usually it is rather small though. If there is a large hernia or a hernia with the stomach protruding through it, I have only heard of surgery to fix this. During the EGD they can get an idea if there is a hernia and how big it is, usually. If you do have the surgery most surgeons want you to wait at least 8 weeks or so before lifting anything heavy. For serious weight training I would ask your doctor how long they recommend before continuing.

Take care,
Bill
opnwhl4
Moderator: GERD/Heartburn
Nissen 6/06 and 5/09
#3 on 8/24/11

aquapura
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 12/30/2011 11:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the response Bill. The reason I guess i'm opposed to surgery if i have a HH is because i've heard it doesn't fix things completely and there are risks that it can recur again very easily.. I do lift heavy weights for my size (actually i'm wondering if that was the initial cause of this whole heart burn thing) does surgery restore things to a completely normal state?

Post Edited (aquapura) : 12/30/2011 10:05:20 PM (GMT-7)


bcfromfl
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 384
   Posted 12/31/2011 1:14 AM (GMT -6)   
I was a regular weightlifter until GERD and IBS sapped my strength. IMO, powerlifting is out with a HH. If you want to continue with your hobby, you'll have to make the move to bodybuilding -- no more proving to yourself and gym-mates how much you can lift. Lighter weights, higher repititions.

When I feel good enough to work out some, I just do squats with the bar alone. Deadlifting is out...and really doesn't do anything for you that other better exercises could replace. Deadlifting is hard on your vertebrae and discs anyway. Even benches, which would seem to be an OK exercise since you're isolating things pretty well, actually requires quite a bit of abdominal tension and straining.

I had TIF surgery in August. You mentioned you have some anxiety. If you will permit me an observation, from someone who has spent 30 years in gyms: powerlifting -- and even bodybuilding -- is rife with testosterone and fear. This side of it is counterproductive to a healthy lifestyle. You want to dig deeper, and enjoy your hobby for what it is...and not let the competitive aspect of it potentially cause harm.

Surgery won't restore things to "normal". Yes, it can place your LES where it should be, but once you have a hiatal hernia, you will always be predisposed to it, and even a surgical fix can become undone.

I'm sorry if this is a little hard to read, but actually, once you see the wisdom of a few, simple changes, you will find a peace that will more than replace the loss of bragging rights over a 500-pound lift.

Best wishes!

-Bruce

aquapura
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 12/31/2011 1:33 AM (GMT -6)   
Bruce is it possible to private msg on this forum? I'd really like to talk to you.

Thanks,
phil

Post Edited (aquapura) : 12/30/2011 11:38:15 PM (GMT-7)


bcfromfl
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 384
   Posted 12/31/2011 2:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Phil --

If there is, I don't know how to do it. I hope I can offer some experience or peace-of-mind otherwise...

-Bruce

aquapura
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 12/31/2011 2:46 AM (GMT -6)   
Oh well i guess i'll have to just say it over the forum. I've always prided myself on having a strong body and being fit. Strength training for me was never about how much i could lift for my friends or anything like that. It was a challenge for me and honestly it's like therapy for me being in the gym and just doing my workout. I don't care what other guys are doing or how much they can lift. I didn't know there was anything like this that could so suddenly take away something i loved (besides very serious things). I don't even know if i have a hiatal hernia yet so i guess i'll have to wait... I'm hoping i somehow have GERD without the hernia but don't really know what else it could be... I guess i don't really know what i'm trying to say a lot of people probably wouldn't understand this and say 'just move on and do something else' but it's not that easy when you've been doing something for years. Bruce i don't know what to tell you i guess i'm looking for some type of inspiration on how to move on from someone that's been there and done that. IS it still possible to be a healthy young person and do things like combat sports? what's left from this terrible afflication?

bcfromfl
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 384
   Posted 12/31/2011 3:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Well, first off, let's not "write the script" just yet. You have your appointment for an endoscopy, and hopefully that will offer a bit more info than what you have at the moment. Secondly, don't "hope" that you have GERD!! Anyone on this message board who has been diagnosed with this condition will tell you, in one way or another, how it has ruined their lives. The fortunate ones are those who can manage it, and live the second phase of their lives in a continued, rewarding manner. But the rest of their lives will never be the same, no matter how they manage it -- either with diet and behavior modifications, medication, or surgery...or all three. I was a professional singer, myself, until the symptoms robbed me of my voice. Because I have LPR, even the TIF wasn't sufficient to keep all the reflux from my throat, and I am still struggling.

I know just exactly how you feel about your level of fitness, and how it is a product of your discipline. And the fact that it's a part of your weekly routine, and you do it just the same on the days you want to be at the gym, and even those days you don't. I've been there. Many years ago, I "lived" for fitness, and, to be frank, my life was pretty shallow, full of angst and dreams. I worked, ate, and slept, and spent my free time at the various gyms I belonged to -- either lifting or taking aerobics classes. There was nothing else. Sure, I had pride in how I looked and felt, but that was it. I'm not saying that my situation was similar to yours, just sharing where I was at.

I'm also not claiming that I've reached some sort of metaphysical nirvana, either. As a matter of fact, my life now is nowhere near what I would call balanced. I spend an inordinate amount of time fretting about one thing or another having to do with this condition, doctors' appointments, how I am to proceed, etc. I am intolerant of PPIs, so managing this is especially difficult for me.

You mention "combat sports" -- and I'm not sure what that means, exactly. You're really going to have to wait until you have more information to set a path for the rest of your life. One question you'll have to become accustomed to asking yourself, in many aspects of your life, is, "What is this for?" Meaning, "Why do I do this?" or, "What do I get out of it?" In the case of "combat sports", for example, do you do it just because you have a lot of pent-up energy that you need to burn off in a competitive manner? If that's the case, then maybe doing an Iron Man will give you the same pay-off. That sort of thing...

But if you find yourself prone to anxiety, maybe that in itself is a message to you that you need to take a look at some things that you're involved in, that maybe aren't providing you what you think you want out of it. IF you find yourself diagnosed with some upper GI condition, you can still be active, so try to put your mind at ease about that. You may have to adjust some things, and cultivate different goals, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.

Quite often, I get going on my own "pity party" about how awful my life is now, and the fact that hope is a fleeting will-o-the-wisp that I can't seem to grasp when I need it. But all I have to do is remind myself, right here on this message board, how much WORSE things could be for me. There are folks out there who have much worse struggles. My achilles heel is gratitude, and I fully admit I have to learn how to appreciate the things I have, better than I do.

Hope some of this helps. Again, you're on the right track by seeking medical attention, and try to take one day at a time...breathe...listen to music...spend time with friends...etc. When you need to "step up to the plate" when you get the results from your endoscopy, you'll be ready. But try not to worry about the unknown before it arrives! And, remember too, if you get overwhelmed by medical stuff from your doctor that you don't understand, or want to bounce things off of us, know that there is a wealth of experience available to you here!

Best wishes!

-Bruce

theacidrefluxman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 714
   Posted 12/31/2011 9:59 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi aquapura,

I also lift...stronglifts like deadlift, squats, bench, etc. None of them increase my GERD except for bench now and then...

I am personally at the point where I am going to push for surgery because I have been dealing with this for 4 years with no resolution. Sorry to say but you may reach a point where giving up lifting, or heavy lifting, in order to solve this medical problem will be an attractive trade-off. You are just beginning so many options exist, hopefully you will be able to find one that allows you to continue to lift.

aquapura
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 1/1/2012 12:59 AM (GMT -6)   
Bruce your words were really moving. Thanks for being so honest and open about your condition and what you're going and have been through. There's lots of wisdom in your response and i read it a couple of times. I guess I will have to wait and see...

Acidrefluxman: It seems you made the choice to keep training despite having a HH. I don't really know the affect that lifting has on my acid reflux yet. When i went to the gym last i had acid reflux and keep working through it despite feeling a bit sick. Just curious if you do all those strong lifts aren't you worried about the surgery becoming a problem even once it has heal? I'm assuming you're doing it because of the symptoms of GERD rather than anything related to weightlifting... Just wondering does continued lifting pose a threat to making the hernia bigger? Or is it just recommended to stop because the GERD becomes worse?

Thanks

theacidrefluxman
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 714
   Posted 1/2/2012 12:09 PM (GMT -6)   
@ aquapura

Actually, a point I need to clarify with my doctor is the size of my hernia. I was told that it was really too small to cause reflux, and that is probably wasn't harming me. I'll clarify if stronglifts is a bad idea for me, so thanks for bringing this issue to mind.

You are right...As long as I wasn't getting worse reflux lifting weights, I figured it wasn't hurting me. Interestingly, when I began benchpress gave me a lot of heartburn...so much so that I thought it was muscular or something because it just made no sense to me. Since, it has calmed down a lot...today I benched more than ever and had no additional reflux from what I could tell.

Trust me, if I have to give up lifting due to GERD or surgery I will be as sad a camper as anyone. But I guess you gotta do what you gotta do.

Dave234
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2011
Total Posts : 320
   Posted 1/3/2012 9:40 AM (GMT -6)   
I had the nissen fundoplication just over 6 weeks ago. My surgeon told me that I would eventually be able to lift weights as I had been before the surgery. I am very skinny right now, and had been for a while (because of the reflux suffocating my lungs for about a year), but I used to bench over 275 lbs.

I don't plan on benching that much now, but I would like to work my way back up to about 200 lbs. My routine consisted of dumbbell bench press, dumbbell flyes (back and front), bicep curls, tricep curls, and deltoid lifts (not sure what they're called). I also used to do sit-ups every third day but I'm gonna hold off on those for many months, and then after that take it really easy on those, unfortunately. What I probably will eventually do is just flex on and off when I sit. That way I'm not putting too much pressure on the wrap.

I do not plan on lifting anytime soon. I cannot WAIT to start again. I totally understand the love of weightlifting. It is a part of me, and while I can live without it, I much prefer to lift weights. It makes me feel good in every possible way, amplifies life and makes it so much more enjoyable.

I've heard the trick in lifting weights after the nissen is in breathing. If you've got a vein bulging from your forehead and your face is beet red, then you are doing it WRONG. Otherwise, if you learn to breathe right, lift slowly, deliberately, concentrating on breathing, you should be good. You won't be jacked like the Hulk as before. Or who knows? Maybe you will? I just don't know. All I know is, I'm 6 weeks out, and I'm going to start lifting weights again in a few months. But I'm going to take it easy. And my surgeon said it is totally fine; that I'll be able to do everything as I once had been able to. And I'd asked him many, many times about the weightlifting, saying that I used to lift over 200 lbs, and without batting an eye he said I'd be able to.

So there you go.

Just know if you get the surgery you won't be lifting anything for a few months. Your muscle mass will decrease significantly. You really have to not care about that. And you know what? Anyone who cares that much about it needs to get away from weightlifting anyway. At least for a while. Get yourself better on the inside, and THEN get yourself better on the outside.

Tinlou
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 390
   Posted 1/3/2012 1:22 PM (GMT -6)   
What is everyone's symptoms as far as weight lifting/exercising and their GERD? I get really nauseous, fatigued, stomach hurts ect.. after I do any weight bearing exercises or even stomach crunches. Lately, even jogging has made my GERD worse..geesh, when you try to take care of yourself this sure does make it difficult.

Dave234
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2011
Total Posts : 320
   Posted 3/27/2012 2:01 PM (GMT -6)   
Any else care to "weigh" in?

JoyceM
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 9/4/2012 4:53 PM (GMT -6)   
This is a technique I learned from a chiropractor for pushing down the stomach:
1. Get a small plate, like a salad or dessert plate.
2. Lie on your back on the floor. I like to put a pillow under my head and upper body.
3. Inhale all the way. This causes the diaphragm to push the stomach down.
4. Hold the desert plate in the center of your body right below the ribs, perpendicular to the floor as if it were cutting your body in half.
5. Press down on the plate with both hands as you let the air out of your lungs slowly. This will prevent the stomach from moving up as the diaphragm moves up.
6. Repeat as needed from step 3. Don't rush. You should feel more comfortable afterward.

I like to do this once in the morning and once in the evening. When the maneuver is successful, you will hear the stomach gurgle. If you feel the muscles are tight and the stomach doesn't want to relax down, you can start by resting for awhile with a warm compress on the stomach, and then trying again. Sometimes you may feel stuck if you need to burp. After the burp, things will relax again. Good luck!

danggerd
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2014
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 4/22/2014 5:47 PM (GMT -6)   
Anyone ever know what happened to aquapura's GERD and possible HH? I have been having same thing bench pressing just 135 seems to make it worst at times. A lot of burping for the past 6 months without even eating sometimes. Left chest pain. Sucks anyone chime in please.
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Monday, September 01, 2014 6:14 AM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,206,179 posts in 245,568 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 155417 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, BarbaraA.
236 Guest(s), 4 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
getting by, NiceCupOfTea, lism4883, Mississippi Jane


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest  Follow HealingWell.com on YouTube
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2014 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer