Post-op lap nissen fundo/hiatal hernia repair

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porcelain doll
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 128
   Posted 10/27/2007 5:56 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello:  I had the Lap Nissen Fundoplication/Hiatal Hernia repair done on October 17, 2007.  What can I say?  This has been the toughest/hardest surgery I have ever had.  I have had several surgeries to include a hysterectomy (sp?), 2 c sections, gallbladder removal but this one took the cake.  I was in the hospital for 3 days and had a gastric tube in my nose via my stomach for about 2 days.  I have been on a liquid diet for about 1 1/2 weeks and now I am finally on a soft diet.  The surgeon said my hiatal hernia was a pretty good size and that was why nothing ever worked (meaning the PPI's, DGL, acupuncture and so on).  He also said what had saved my esophagus was the massive doses of PPI's I was on.  I haven't had much of an appetite and believe it or not, I am one of the lucky ones who can burp.  He did a full wrap (I can't belch really loud like I used to but after I swallow I can feel a small burp).  I am still in alot of pain and am taking pain medication to ease the pain and also take an anti-nausea pill too because he doesn't want me to vomit (I haven't had to vomit but have been close especially the first few days but they gave me something in the iv to stop the nausea and vomiting).  Yes, I was very weak because I wasn't eating much only liquid and wasn't drinking much either.  In fact, I was so nervous any loud noise would make me want to jump out of my skin but this is getting better (this isn't usually the case with me, I am a 44 year old female).  I think that this happened because they gave me so many narcotics in the hospital, even when I was leaving the hospital on the wheel chair I was so nervous (I can't explain it) but this has gotten better with time.  The only medication I am on now is the Tylenol with codeine, anti-nausea medication, and Pepcid AC. 
 
I can't say whether I recommend the surgery or not because I am in recovery and he said it would take time and it has been rough.  Healing is a process and it does take time but according to all of the test I had done I didn't have a choice.  I just hope and pray that all goes well and hope to have a safe/speedy recovery.  Thanks to all who took the time to answer my questions since I was so apprehensive about the surgery.....Barbara....

hopeisreal
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 345
   Posted 10/27/2007 6:11 PM (GMT -6)   
Barbara: I hope your recovery goes well---and you have good news to tell us after you are feeling better!

doghouse
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 138
   Posted 10/28/2007 10:35 PM (GMT -6)   
I hope you are feeling better! Please keep us updated, I'm looking at having this procedure so I'd like to hear all the good, the bad and the ugly!

TammyGrl0528
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 1345
   Posted 10/29/2007 12:28 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey Barbara...

I am glad to hear that the surgery is over for you! Good Job on that, right?

I am sorry to hear that you are at the moment not feeling amazing, but you are right, recovery takes time.

I do hope you will pop in from time to time and let us know how you are doing. I pray you have an easy and speedy recovery. Do let us know how it goes.

For right now, take it easy, and rest, OK hun...and let us know if you need anything...even if you just need to vent about how you are feeling...we are here for ya!

Wishing you the best.
 GERD Forum Moderator
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bokbok
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 61
   Posted 10/30/2007 5:40 PM (GMT -6)   
hi babara hope you get better quick as it sounds like you need a medal after all that, and i have been thinking about getting it done, but i know they wont want to do it as i dont have a hernia but i,m thinking on just paying for it .

HappilyWrapped
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 182
   Posted 10/31/2007 6:34 PM (GMT -6)   
I had a laproscopic Nissen Fundoplasty recently. Mine was 10/22/07. I'm in my mid-40's. I must say that I've read lots of horror stories regarding the procedure. I cannot add to the bad stories. This may be a lengthy posting, but for anyone considering the procedure or who have had it recently I know you want details of a good outcome. You're probably looking for recent info and not items posted back in 2001 - which is mostly what I found when I was looking for information.

It's been a week and I am thrilled with my decision. The surgeon I chose has not done many of these procedures; however, I had him as a surgeon for another procedure last year and I trust him completely. He had a collegue who has done several fundo's assist him. For the first time in over 10 years I can lay down flat! I can sleep on my husband's shoulder without GERD symptoms in my throat. I may be eating mush now, but in a few months life will be grand! I can burp - some people cannot after the procedure. I'll find out at some point if I can or cannot vomit, but I'm prepared to not be able to. If I can it's an added bonus. My surgeon did not put me on anti-nauseau medication as a precaution against vomiting after the surgery.

According to an endoscopy, I had a large hiatal hernia and my esophagus was damaged, but I had not reached Barrett's yet. Up till last spring, I had been taking Protonix once a day. Medication was not something I wanted to continue nor did I want the yearly fight with the insurance company who thought Prilosec OTC was just as good as prescription strength PPI's. Everything caused GERD symptoms even while on medication - even a glass of water. A plate of spaghetti and sauce was the same as eating nails and tacks. Sitting up in bed was the only way to attempt to sleep. Some nights the chest pain was so bad I'd walk the floors wondering if it was an esophageal spasm or heart attack. I'd sometimes attempt to lie down on my side, but would wake up choking on "stuff" that had come up the esophagus while I slept and then I breathed it in. My surgeon and gastroenterologist consulted together for the past 7 months working up to this surgery. I had a manometry and 24-hr ph study last spring - I had it done after going off meds to give the doctors a baseline of what my true acid production was. The results showed I had LOTS of acid and poor motility in the esophagus. So I worked with the gastroenterologist over the summer and changed meds and doses. I also had a breath test done that showed the long-term use of PPI's had killed stomach acid and allowed an overgrowth of bacteria in my intestines - this was cleared up by a week of an antibiotic (by the way, the symptoms of bacterial overgrowth mimick lactose intolerance - once the bacteria problem was fixed I could enjoy dairy products, including a full glass of milk, like I hadn't been able to in several years). That added to my determination to have the surgery - I wanted my own stomach acid to kill bad bacteria before it gets to the intestines like it was meant to do. In order to prepare for another set of tests before the surgery, I started to take Nexium twice a day for the rest of the summer. I had another 24-hr ph and another manometry test. The mega-doses of Nexium had worked to prevent acid. Without the acid damaging my esophagus, they could see that the motility problem had been caused by the acid. This meant I was a good candidate for a full Nissen wrap.

I have had no medication for acid since Sunday, 10/21/07 and I've had no reflux. In the past, 2 days without medication put me in agony. The steri-strips should fall off the 5 incisions soon and the incisions give little discomfort - unless I move in a way that allows something to press on my abdomen. I was able to burp the day after surgery. I started on ice chips the evening of surgery and the next morning began a liquid diet - jello, chicken broth, Italian ice, cranberry juice. In the hospital I received morphine intravenously. I stayed 2 nights in the hospital. Because of several medication allergies, I cannot take a lot of drugs - therefore, I've been on Tylenol extra-strength liquid since I came home from the hospital and that has been adequate. I eat nothing thicker than pudding and the surgeon told me to continue that for 4 weeks. I saw the surgeon at his office 8 days after surgery and will see him again next week. I crush my blood pressure pills (which is OK according to the pharmacist) and swallow them with runny instant mashed potatoes.

My surgeon explained what to expect before surgery and has answered all my questions - no surprises were handed to me. From what I've read in other postings, having good information is unusual. I've read many postings about people who did not expect to loose the ability to belch or vomit. I was concerned about the trouble breathing I experienced after the surgery, but the surgeon explained that to tighten the hiatal hernia, they put stitches in the diaphragm. Therefore, I'll have a bit of a problem taking deep breaths and talking until it heals (which for some reason my husband is happy about). He also explained that although I felt great the day after surgery and not as great a week later, it was because it takes a while for swelling to happen and then dissapate. He explained that I'd feel worse a week after surgery and then things would get better. This same scenario happened with a previous surgery where the swelling and discomfort were worse a week after the procedure than the day after; so I have no reason to doubt his word this time.

My advice to anyone anticipating the nissen procedure is to do it providing you've had the proper tests first. A good gastroenterologist will request the proper tests be performed before surgery - the 24-hr ph study and the motility test are biggies - extremely unpleasant, but well worth doing to ensure the best possible surgerical outcome. Do your research online, but remember that most people only post the bad, not the good outcomes. Afterwards, have patience with your recovery. You've altered your stomach size and shape and your internal organs were moved around a bit during the procedure. Expect to be on a liquid or soft diet for a while as you heal. Give your tummy a chance to heal and give it easy-to-swallow and digest foods. Stay away from carbonation and any gassy foods for a while. If you have a hiatal hernia repaired, keep in mind that a large opening has just been made smaller. Expect some discomfort when you breath deeply. They pump you full of gas during the procedure, so you'll have a few days of internal pain as the gas dissipates (usually around your shoulders) - you'll also be very flatulent. Oh, and if you're a female, invest in one of those tank tops with a sports bra in it. You won't be wearing a regular bra for a while and "hanging around" gets uncomfortable after a few days.

I am thrilled with my choice to have this surgery; it was in the planning for several months and was worth the wait. I highly recommend it to anyone who's gastroenterologist says they are a good candidate for it.

Good luck if you are deciding. Good luck if you are recovering.

outtllaw
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 69
   Posted 10/31/2007 8:57 PM (GMT -6)   
Welcome and I am glad to hear that you are doing well HappilyWrapped. Keep us posted

porcelain doll
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 128
   Posted 11/1/2007 11:10 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks to all who have wished me well during my recovery.  It has been two weeks and my recovery is coming along but slowly.  I am still on a soft diet eating things like pudding, soup, jello, lentils, scrambled egg, cream of wheat, spagetti.  Thank God I haven't had any swallowing problems like choking but I am very careful and take small bites and take my time eating.  The soft diet is kind of hard to take for a while but it won't be like this forever.  My 5 incisions are healing but the biggest one still hurts a little, especially if I laugh, cough, or a have big sneeze. 
 
HappilyWrapped, I am glad you aren't having any problems.  I don't have any breathing pain but I still have chest pain.  I don't know if it is the wrap or the hiatal hernia repair (probably both).  I also still have nausea and take the anti-nausea pill.  The other day just this past Tuesday, I had really bad nausea and it lasted for about 2 hours and I was so scared I'd throw up but thank God I didn't.  I hope the nausea will eventually go away.  My surgeon said that anytime they operate on the stomach it really causes lots of trauma to it and it takes time for the stomach to recover from the trauma.  The pain that I feel in my middle of my chest and is like a dull ache.  Do you feel this type of ache?  Yes, I agree the test are awful but necessary to facilitate the surgery.  I will keep posting as I go along on my road to recovery.  Again, much thanks and kindness to all who were thinking of me...Barbara....

Another Day
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 1055
   Posted 11/2/2007 1:34 AM (GMT -6)   
Barbara,
 
I'm glad you haven't gotten anything stuck going down, that was the most painful part for me.  That was my main concern for you.  I didn't have any nausea, but I did have a lot of diarrhea.  I'm still glad I had it done, even though I have to agree with you, it was the most difficult surgery I've ever had to recover from.  But, then I haven't had anything major, mostly knee surgeries, breast biopsies, rotator cuff repair, etc.  I had both knees done at the same time a couple of times and that was easier the the lap Nissen, but when you really need your esophagus and hiatal hernia repaired, it's well worth having it done.  The misery doesn't last long.  I never expected you to have nausea.  That can't be any fun at all.
 
Please keep us posted on your recovery.
 
Take care!
 
Carla

Moderator, Allergies/Asthma
 
Help support the forums so we can support you:  http://www.healingwell.com/donate
 
 
Epilepsy, asthma, GERD, depression, hypothyroidism, tinnitus


TammyGrl0528
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 1345
   Posted 11/2/2007 8:12 AM (GMT -6)   
Hey there Barbara...

So glad to hear you are coming along well with no complications!

I know you aren't 100% yet, but you are getting there.

I look forward to you posting more about your recovery. I think it's great that we have someone here who can talk about this procedure first hand for anyone who is thinking about doing it too.

Thank you so much for sharing...keep us posted!

Wishing you the best!
 GERD Forum Moderator
    Please share, only if you can spare! 
 Diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Panic Attacks.
 Clickable Link that may be of interest to some...as I find I often like to check drug interactions...Drug Interactions
 
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HappilyWrapped
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 182
   Posted 11/3/2007 2:14 PM (GMT -6)   
Barbara,

To answer your question, yes, I'm having some chest discomfort - your description of a dull ache was pretty accurate. I am not surprised as the location of the wrap is in the chest area. I would think that the inflamation after surgery would cause pressure or a dull ache sensation. Not to mention the hiatal hernia stitches are in that same location.

Still no nausea for me; however, my diet isn't the same as yours. I won't touch a lentil (bean) as they are gassy and that would cause more discomfort. I eat jello, a soy-based meal replacement drink, very runny scrambled eggs (no milk, I use water to thin), herbal tea, vanilla soy pudding, Tofutti soy frozen dessert, cream of wheat thinned with vanilla soy milk and my own homemade soup - I make chicken soup and puree it before consuming. I'm not lactose intollerant, but to give my stomach a chance to heal I'm avoiding dairy on my own.

I have diarrhea, but I'm not surprised as I'm eating nothing solid and my GI system hasn't digested food properly in years due to the PPI's. It's got to be in shock actually being able to function the way it was meant to.

I do hope your nausea goes away soon.

TammyGrl0528
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 1345
   Posted 11/3/2007 5:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Barbara, hun, I hope you are doing well.

Happily wrapped...welcome aboard, I am so thrilled you have been able to talk with Barbara the way you are. Amazing. Glad you found us.

Let us know if you need anything!!!

Again, welcome to healingwell
 GERD Forum Moderator
    Please share, only if you can spare! 
 Diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Panic Attacks.
 Clickable Link that may be of interest to some...as I find I often like to check drug interactions...Drug Interactions
 
~Tammy~


doghouse
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 138
   Posted 11/3/2007 7:48 PM (GMT -6)   
I have a question about your pre-op tests. The manometry (sp?)...are you a better candidate for the surgery if that comes back normal or abnormal? I had one a couple of years ago that came back normal. But now I suffer from reoccurring esphogitis (confirmed via endoscopy) and hoarseness even though I take PPI's.

porcelain doll
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 128
   Posted 11/3/2007 8:29 PM (GMT -6)   
Yes, the chest pain is a dull ache and I haven't taken anymore painkillers in the last three days.  The pain is there and it does come and go but now it isn't as bad as it was and I just try to ignore it.  Luckily, I am not having problems with diarrhea but the nausea yes.  I was so happy because yesterday I didn't take the nausea pill all day but today I needed it around lunch time.  I have been eating some soft/solid foods but am being very careful.  Here is what I have consumed all day today.  For breakfast a very soft scrambled egg, lunch a chicken leg (chicken breast is too hard and chicken leg is softer) and 1/2 of a sweet potatoe (I take very very small bites and feel as if I chew 100 times before I swallow and am taking small sips of water as I swallow, jello, and for dinner I had a smoothie I made in the blender with ice cream, milk, banana, and strawberries, and had a small bit of homemade soup.  It is very hard because my appetite comes and goes and if you over eat you will get nauseated, so the key is to take very small bites, chew chew very good, and small portion sizes, and take your time eating slow.  At first, I could feel everything going down and it felt weird and it did hurt somewhat, even water.  I haven't had a choking incident but have been careful (thanks to Carla's advice).  I am hoping that eventually I will be able to eat like before the surgery but now I take very small bites and take my time. 
 
For Doghouse:  Yes, the manometry test are very important because it tells the surgeon how tight to do the nissen wrap because it checks for swallowing motility and also the pressure of the LES.  In my case, my swallowing was normal but my Les was a little off because the hiatal hernia was fairly close to the LES.  Since my hernia was a pretty good size and fairly close to the LES area that was why nothing ever worked.  The surgeon said what had saved my esophagus was the massive doses of PPI's I was taking.   I was on double doses of PPI and supplementing with 300 zantac at night and still I was burning up with heartburn.  I was so frustrated and had my gallbladder taken out 4 weeks prior to the nissen/hiatal hernia surgery and the gerd went over the roof.  I remember it was a Sat and Sun I couldn't do anything all day I had painful heartburn and no matter what I did it wouldn't subside.  I don't know if they recommend the surgery for esphoghitis (sp?) but the surgery is only the last resort when all other measures have failed and they will make you get all of these tests before they recommend the surgery, at least in my case.  I hope this answers your question.  Barbara....

HappilyWrapped
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 182
   Posted 11/3/2007 9:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Barbara -
Wow! You're eating things I was specifically told to avoid. Strawberries have seeds - I was told no fruit with seeds or skin for at least 4 weeks. I was also told I wouldn't be eating anything like chicken or meat this calendar year. I'm looking at thin mashed potatoes and butternut squash for Thanksgiving and maybe some thinned out stuffing if it doesn't have sausage. You're braver than I am for eating. I'll continue with nothing more than pudding consistency and then move on to ground chicken or turkey in a few weeks - but any real piece of meat like a chicken leg I'll postpone for quite a while.


Doghouse - The manometry test determines how well your esaphagus propells food down into your stomach. The muscle movements must be strong enough to push food through the wrap after surgery. In my case, the first manometry test came back poor and the planned surgery was cancelled. Then the question was - Had the esophagus been damaged by acid for so long that it didn't propel food properly or was it just the way my body functioned naturally. If it was caused by acid, they would be able to tell by placing me on mega doses of Nexium to suppress all acid and repeating the test after a while. So after several weeks on Nexium twice a day, a second manometry test was performed which showed normal function. That meant that the surgery was now a go. They knew that by keeping acid out of my esophagus, the esophageal movements would work properly after surgery.

I took PPI's for 6 years - protonix 40 mg once a day religiously to be exact. I moved during those 6 years to a different town and switched gastroenterologist, PCP and surgeon. Once I got to the new town, things got much better and the care I received improved. I mentioned to the new PCP that I was having difficulty swallowing, would wake up from a sound sleep choking on icky stuff in my throat, had a nasty dry cough and had to sip water constantly. He referred me to agastroenterologist in my new town who immediately had an endoscopy done. Six years on protonix had not healed my esophagus and it was so bad that they were discussing the surgical procedure to correct the acid reflux as soon as I woke up from the endoscopy - they were surprised that I did not have Barrett's because it was so bad down there. That's when the manometry and 24-hour ph study stuff began leading up to surgery. Just because you are on PPI's does not mean they are strong enough or the right pill for your body. Damage can still be happening even with a PPI. I don't know what you're taking, but it's been explained to me by a physician that Nexium is the nuclear strength med and Protonix is a lightweight.

TammyGrl0528 - I know how hard it was when I was looking for information before deciding to have the procedure done. I received good medical information from both the surgeon and gastroenterologist, but wanted real people information from those who had had the procedure recently. Unfortunately, most of the stuff I found was negative and was also old. As surgical procedures get better over time, it was hard to find recent success stories. I'm fortunate to have a very good MD watching over my recovery so I don't need this area to find answers. However, if what I have experienced helps anyone recover or decide if they want to go forward with the surgery, then it's worth joining this board.

doghouse
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 138
   Posted 11/3/2007 10:00 PM (GMT -6)   
Have either of you have had the wrap done gone back to work yet? If so, what kind of jobs do you have?

outtllaw
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 69
   Posted 11/4/2007 12:51 AM (GMT -6)   
How long does the laproscopic Nissen Fundoplasty last? can it be redone, and what kind of activities cant u do a year after surgery?

HappilyWrapped
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 182
   Posted 11/4/2007 8:25 AM (GMT -6)   
Doghouse:
I went to work this past Friday for 2 hours just to do some paperwork. I did not drive - I was dropped off and picked up. Most people didn't know I was there as I went straight to my office via a back door. I am an IT person on a school campus, so my job normally requires walking between buildings, up/down stairs, lifting computers and bending under desks. It also requires paperwork I can perform sitting at my desk. My surgery was 10/22 and Friday was just under 2 weeks post op. I was tired at the end of 2 hours and knew I could not go back full time yet. My surgeon does not want me to go back untill 11/12 and I agree with him. He also explained that because I was on the table for a little over 3 hours for the procedure, it would take at least 2 weeks for that much anesthesia to get out of my system - that means being extra tired for a while. I nap every afternoon for at least an hour and sleep 8-10 hours at night (my normal would be 7 hours).

I know enough to trust the surgeon's timeframe to go back to work because he's been correct before for other procedures I've had done by him. He knows better than I what's going on inside that I cannot see. So it will be no heavy lifting (nothing more than a gallon of milk) for 6 weeks and I'll go to work beginning on 11/12 and stay as long as I can until I get tired. Thanksgiving break will also give me a bit of time off.


Outlaw:
I have a co-worker whose husband had a full wrap over 10 years ago when they only did the procedure open (not laproscopic). He now leads a totally normal life and when seasick (on a fishing boat) he can vomit enough to get relief. He takes no meds and is happy he chose the procedure due to the improvement of quality of life. Because the procedure is still being tracked, there really isn't enough information gathered as to length of time. I read different results when I did some investigating online. I also have to remember that you don't read about good outcomes often - most people only write to complain.

Fundoplasty is not reversable. I obtained that information from internet research and my surgeon. They may have to go in and fix things for some people if it slips in the future. I am taking all precautions to follow instructions to ensure I heal properly and have less chance of slipping. This procedure has never been said to be 100% successful - anyone considering it needs to understand that it may or may not work for each individual and that there is no guaranteed time it will last. Enjoyment of whatever time I have acid free is my goal and if it isn't permanent, then I'm grateful for what time I get.

After surgery my activities are limited - not as much by the surgeon as by my own body. The surgeon only said no lifting. I do not carry a vacuum up or down stairs, but beginning 5 days after surgery, I did push it. We have a lightweight Oreck, so I was OK, but I could feel it pulling just a bit on my abdomen area depending on how I moved my arm to push it. I would never have touched the heavier vacuum we have. Washing dishes standing at the sink was OK. Reaching for something high in a cabinet was uncomfortable, so I didn't do it. I do laundry, but my husband carries the basket up and downstairs as well as lifts the laundry detergent to measure it. I've gone to the grocery store with my husband, but he lifts the bags; I walked and used the carriage as support when tired. Basically, my activities for the past two weeks have been light housework, reading, watching TV and a small bit of baking (because it's something I enjoy doing).

Movement is good to keep your plumbing working - you don't want to just sit or lay down all the time. However, you won't feel like doing much. You won't be lifting for a while. You won't be intimate with anyone for a few weeks. You won't be getting a bear hug for a while. I will start driving again next week - I was avoiding it because of the incisions. In the passenger seat I placed a folded bath towel between me and the shoulder belt. Moving my right leg to drive would have pulled on the incisions if I started too soon. Again, each person is different as to how fast they heal.

Because the incision areas are a bit sensitive, I've been wearing yoga pants rolled down under my belly button and an oversized sweat shirt. Material rubbing on the incisions was uncomfortable. Not being dressed properly prohibited me from going too far away from home. I am just today able to wear a pair of loose pants zipped up where they belong, but a stiff denim would be uncomfortable. Your tummy will be bloated for at least two weeks - it will go down during that time, but don't expect your pants to fit right after the procedure. Only each individual will know what they can tolerate, but the standard guidelines would be no heavy lifting for several weeks and just a bit of walking to stay active. Six weeks after the surgery, I'll be fine for all normal activity. Because computers and the old CRT monitors are so big and heavy, I'll probably refrain from lifting them for a while longer. As I'm a girl and work with several guys, it's no big deal for them to handle the heavy lifting.

snakelover
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 29
   Posted 11/4/2007 11:33 AM (GMT -6)   
so is this surgery for anyone with acid reflux, obviously for people with really bad acid reflux, but could anyone with acid reflux get this surgery. Mine is no where near bad enough to justify surgery at this point as it is not really effecting my daily activities as much as a lot of other people describe, but if it was to get worse would this surgery be an option. oh and by the way i'm 17 just in case that would have some sort of effect on whether or not i could get surgery, not hat i need it now

HappilyWrapped
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 182
   Posted 11/4/2007 12:14 PM (GMT -6)   
snakelover:

This procedure is not for everyone. The only way to know if it's right for you is to work with a really good gastroenterologist if your symptoms are bad and/or are not controlled by daily medication. There are some people who have naturally weak motility (muscle movements that propell food down your esophagus and into your stomach). Those people are not good candidates for the surgery as it would impair their ability to swallow food permanently. For those whose motility is weak because of acid damage, the surgery is a good option because it keeps acid in the stomach where it belongs thus allowing the esphagus to remain healthy and able to move food the way it was intended to do.

Age does not affect the ability to have this surgery; it is performed on young children who have medical issues which require their lower esophageal sphincter to be reinforced.

TammyGrl0528
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 1345
   Posted 11/4/2007 2:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Happyilywrapped...you are giving great advice on this procdure, I just wanted to thank you for that!
 GERD Forum Moderator
    Please share, only if you can spare! 
 Diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Panic Attacks.
 Clickable Link that may be of interest to some...as I find I often like to check drug interactions...Drug Interactions
 
~Tammy~


snakelover
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 29
   Posted 11/4/2007 3:33 PM (GMT -6)   
yeah thanks so much for the info!

porcelain doll
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 128
   Posted 11/4/2007 6:22 PM (GMT -6)   
HappilyWrapped:  I was wondering if you have any pain on your left shoulder radiating down to your arm/elbow?  I have noticed this for a while and will ask the surgeon when I have my next follow up visit.  My right side is just fine but my left side even gives me trouble when I need to hook my bra or say if I were to swing my left arm sort of fast, it literally kills me.  Also, I have noticed that I have a little brain fog and don't know if it was all of the narcotics/painkillers/anesthesia they gave me while at the hospital.  I am usually a pretty good writer but I have noticed I have to keep re-reading what I am writing to make sure I am making sense (this is not at all like me).  Is this happening to you?  For me, not all of the time but I have noticed my concentration isn't as sharp and hope this is only temporary because of the surgery.  For example, right now my 14 year old has the music blasting in her room, my husband has the t.v. on and of course I am on the computer but I have to really focus and think about what I am going to write about and am having a hard time concentrating.  Again, hope this is just temporary.  As I had mentioned on a previous post I was so nervous when I even left the hospital any sudden noise would make me want to crawl out of my skin but thank God this has gone away but I don't know about my comprehension, ability to focus and hope this hasn't impared my cognitive abilities and this has me somewhat worried.  I also had my gallbladder taken out 4 weeks prior to the nissen surgery (maybe I hadn't even recouped from that anesthesia).  Just wondering your thought.................
 
I think I am being pretty careful about what I am eating.  For the first two weeks I was on a liquid diet then he switched me to a soft diet.  Yes, I can eat the chicken leg but I am not eating it the normal way of eating it.  What I do is boil the chicken leg (I have tried a chicken breast but it is too tough and I know I can't eat it), and I take a very very small piece and take another tiny bit of mashed potatoes then I literally pulverize it in my mouth and at the same time I take a small sip of water while I chew and swallow it a little bit at a time (by the time I have chewed and mixed it with my tongue and swallow it because of the small sips of water, what I am swallowing is pretty much mush) hope this makes sense.  I know this sounds gross but it does take me a while to eat and sometimes it stresses me, especially in the beginning but I am getting a little bit better as time goes by.  I am not eating out either so I take my time and have come up with this strategy of eating (what a genius) LOL!!!!! Luckily, I have been doing ok but trust me you will know what you can and can't swallow.  The stawberries work out ok because in the blender the seeds pretty much end up at the bottom of the glass.  Also, I have been eating a scrambled egg and mix it with cheese and it comes out even softer because of the cheese, kind of mushy, just another idea.  I am getting tired of this diet and will have to find some more ideas to make it but I know I have to prevail because I have come this far and don't want to fail.  I also am drinking ensure and dairy isn't a problem for me but the diet is getting to me like I already said and have lost quite a bit of weight.  Thank God diarrhea isn't a problem but the nausea still bothers me.  Do you have any nausea at all?  The surgeon said nausea could last for a long time and that is why he gave me the nausea pills.  I just have to take it one day at a time and hopefully things will get better for both of us.  Oh yeah, I almost forgot the surgeon stressed for me to not drink any carbonated beverages at all which is no problem for me since I never drink them.  I am sure they told you about the carbonated beverages (I don't remember if either one of us had mentioned them before on the previous posts.) 
 
Outlaw:  The surgeon had also told me the surgery couldn't be reversed but if it ever slipped it could be tightened.  I also had a full wrap but luckily I am able to burp (not a loud belch like I used to but I can burp tiny burps).  If you have surgery you will have to take it easy for a while.  In fact, HappilyWrapped is giving a good accurate account of what you can/can't do post op.  I am taking it easy and at this moment I am not working.  I am a teacher but seriously doubt I could handle a bunch of teenagers at this time since I teach History.   I have a 14 year old girl teenager and I even have a hard time just dealing with her because she is a teenager and wants my undivided attention and I understand this since she is a kid.  The other day we argued about her grades which have dropped somewhat (has boys on the brain) and I was upset and sure enough I had chest pain and it was pretty bad.  My husband was upset with me for getting upset in the first place and thank God he handled the situation.  So in other words, you really have to take good care of yourself because this has been major surgery and recouperation is tough.  I think you would need at least 3-4 weeks to just recoup and take it easy.  I hope to go back in Dec and teach and hope that by then I will have the strengh to deal with those teenagers.  I also agree with Happilywrapped that what you will mostly read on the internet regarding the surgery will be horror stories and some of the info is old.  Some of the horror stories are from 1999, 2001 and so on and agree that technology has improved and people are sure to have better outcomes because of this.  Anytime, one embarks on any surgery there will always be a risk, just even with the anesthesia alone.  So, make sure you are comfortable with who is performing your surgery and do your homework but yes, alot of the information is old and you will get some horror stories and yes, I too read all of these stories and was so scared.  My niece who is a doctor, a pyshichatrist (see don't laugh, I am even having a hard time spelling this word) ha ha, had reassured me about the advances in medicine.  See, first I had my gallbladder taken out 4 weeks prior (already said that) and the gerd went over the roof.  I was in tears when I called her and she spent over an hour on the phone with me because she lives in Houston and she told me you call and go back to that surgeon and get that surgery done and don't even think about it.  When I had the gallbladder surgery done, the surgeon wanted to do the nissen/hiatal hernia repair but I was scared and thought the gallbladder surgery was going to take care of the problem (boy was I wrong).  I had already had all of the appropriate test except the manometric test.  The surgeon even did an endoscopy at the same time I had the gallbladder removed and told me my problem was mechanical because of the hiatial hernia.  My niece told me that I was suffering for nothing and I asked her what would you do?  She said "I'd run to the surgeon's office, talk to him and get it done."  So, yes it is very normal to get scared to read about the surgery.  So, that is my story in a nutshell.....I hope I have answered your questions.....Barbara....

Another Day
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2007
Total Posts : 1055
   Posted 11/4/2007 8:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Barbara,
 
If you like mac & cheese, you could probably eat that now and oatmeal too. Just go slow like you are doing and it will slide down. You start to get tired of the few things you can eat. If you just keep doing what you are doing, I think you are going to have a great result.  I think I told you the first time you go out to eat, try ordering lasagna or spaghetti, they will both slide down if you take small bites.  Keep us posted.  I am so, so happy you haven't had anything stuck.  Just remember if it should happen, do not try to throw it back up.  Just be calm and it will move on down.
 
Take care!
 
Carla
 
 
 
 

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HappilyWrapped
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 182
   Posted 11/4/2007 8:43 PM (GMT -6)   
Barbara:
I do have slight pain in both my left and right shoulders - it comes and goes but mine is more on the right. As I'm 2 weeks post op, I'm still considering this to be remnants of the gas. I've had endoscopic surgery before and it took a long time for the shoulder pain to totally subside. I don't know what side your IV was on, mine was my right hand. Because of the position of my arm when I went to sleep in the operating room, I attribute some of my right shoulder discomfort to muscle pain. I remember it being stretched out straight beside me and was sort of crampy when I went to sleep because it was at a very unnatural angle for my normal body range of motion. Also, once we're asleep, the surgical team might move us as dead weight into whatever position they need us to be in - I've had this before and felt like a Mac truck hit my body for weeks after surgery. I don't want to know what happens after I go to sleep, so I'm not asking any questions. However, I'm doing a lot of comparing issues I have now to those I've had in the past and I'm pretty comfortable with my deduction. I'm sure my should pain will subside. I hope your doctor tells you that yours will go away soon, too.

I also have the brain fog and I attribute this to anesthesia and my body sending it's energy to the incision sites and wrap site. It does take a while for the drugs to totally get out of your system. I'm very much aware that I am not getting as much nutrition as I should nor am I drinking as much water as I should. Both of those items could cause brain farts (or fog as you called it). I got less than normal amounts of medication when I was in the hospital because I am very sensitive to most drugs - so my medication may have been different than yours. I was on light doses of morphine for two days and then went straight to plain extra-strength Tylenol when I got home - so I've been drug-less longer than you because I didn't take strong pain killers after the hospital. I also am not taking an anti-nausea pill like you are and that may have side effects you aren't aware of. For instance, even though an anti-nausea pill sounds harmless, it may have little known side-effects. I know that there are some antibiotics I cannot take because they make me hallucinate - who would think a simple antibiotic could do that, but it is possible. Google the name of your medication and see what the little-known side-effects are. Plus you gave you body 2 procedures back to back - I'm sure it's working hard to do a lot of healing on whatever small amounts of food you are consuming. I bet all that nutrition is being sent to heal the surgical sites which leaves less for your brain. Not a very medical answer, but that's how I see it.

No, not one bit of nausea (I'm knocking on wood here). I had scrambled eggs w/soy cheese for breakfast today and it tasted like heaven. I made it really runny so it went down nice with a cup of herbal tea. I'm not sick of the diet yet - I waited so long for this relief that I'm content with boring food for now.

You are correct, carbonated beverages are definately a no-no. As are any foods that are gassy, like broccoli and beans. For those of you considering this procedure, these items are not on the forbidden list because they'll kill you, but because they make you bloat with gas and you'll be extremely uncomfortable until it works it's way down and out - if you get my drift.

TammyGrl0528:
You're welcome.
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