To allergyqueen re: Sulfites

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Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4389
   Posted 2/13/2008 6:23 PM (GMT -6)   
I saw your post under "Cough Variant Asthma" and felt I had to contact you about your sulfite sensitivity and constant need for decongestants.  There are a couple things you should be aware of:
1)  Decongestants create rebound effects when they wear off, causing the person to think they need them all the time.  This is why nasal sprays that open up sinus passages become addictive as well.  There are healthier ways of dealing with the congestion.  I personally like an herbal product called FenuThyme (a blend of Thyme and Fenugreek) - it usually opens my sinuses pretty well and does not have rebound effects.
2) Dairy products cause me to have hormonally triggered sinus congestion, unless the dairy is cooked (boiled at least 5 minutes, or baked).  Corn causes congestion no matter how it is prepared (I'm actually allergic to corn, but even smelling cooking corn will stuff up my nose).  You may have similar issues with dairy or other foods, too, and the only way to tell is to do an elimination diet and re-challenge the food after a 2-3 week period of avoidance.  Hormonally mediated congestion won't show up on allergy tests (RAST/IgE blood tests, skin prick/scratch tests) or delayed reactivity tests (skin patch tests, IgG blood tests)
3) Sulfite Sensitivity and Perfume intolerance go hand-in-hand, because the same enzyme pathway processes both sulfites and aldehydes (esters, or perfumes, are aldehydes usually).  One can reduce their sensitivity level through nutritional supplementation of the necessary nutrients required by this enzyme pathway (Molybdenum Cofactor Enzyme pathway, with associated enzymes Sulfite Oxidase, Xanthine Oxidase, and Aldehyde Oxidase).  These nutrients include Vitamin B12, Molybdenum, Iron, Magnesium, & Zinc.  Vitamin B1 (thiamin) is depleted by sulfites, and should also be supplemented if a deficiency is suspected.  In addition, Vitamin B12 binds directly to sulfites, which then enables the body to detox the sulfite more readily and easily (sulfites are very toxic and also are difficult to get rid of, hence why we have the sulfite oxidase enzyme to convert sulfites into the less toxic sulfates, which are more easily eliminated).
Regular intake of Vitamin B12 supplements (hydroxocobolamine or methylcobolamine are the superior forms; cyanocobolamine can be difficult for the body to convert into the hydroxo- and methyl- forms of Vitamin B12) can help reduce sensitivity to sulfites by supporting the activity of the Molybdenum Cofactor Enzyme pathway.
Be sure to discuss all supplements, herbs, etc. with your health care providers; also double-check for unsafe medication-herb or medication-supplmenet interactions at your pharmacy and with your doctors before making any changes in your intake of nutritional supplements or herbs.  Good luck,
Gluten & Sulfite Sensitivity, Many Food/Inhalant/Medication Allergies, Asthma, Gut issues (dysmotility, non-specific inflammation), UCTD (Lupus?), Osteoporosis, Anemia, Very Low Lymphocyte Counts (T-Cells & B-Cells), malabsorption/malnutrition, possible Lyme Disease (Igenex Lab IgM WesternBlot positive), etc.
Meds:  Pulmicort, MaxAir, Injectable Vitamin B12, Herbs, Nutritional Supplements, Essential Oils, Homeopathy.

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