Ideas from parents about what a new teacher should know about your child's condition...

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NewteacherUNA
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2010
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/14/2010 8:41 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello all,

I am a student teacher who will be graduating soon and I am concerned about what parents want and need from their child's teacher when it comes to issues such as asthma and other medical conditions. Any and all suggestions of what to do and not to do would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

Red_34
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23353
   Posted 4/14/2010 10:13 AM (GMT -6)   
We had a recent post from another teacher regarding asthma, here is the post:
 
 
As for any other health conditions, you need to evaluate each individual case as it comes.  One common health condition among children is nut allergies.  If the child knows he/she is allergic to nuts then a letter should be sent home to all parents of the kids in that class.  And if you are going to be teaching elementary school aged children, this is especially important because children like to bring treats in for their classmate.
 @--->--SHERRY--<---@
Moderator for Allergies/Asthma and Co-moderator for UC
~Left sided Uc-'92-Colazal(6 daily),6mp(50-100mgs),Bentyl, Prilosec,Biotin,Forvia,Pro-Bio**Unable to tolerate ALL mesalamines**~Allergies-Singulair, Zyrtec~Secondary Reynauds Syndrome~Sacroiliitis~bulging and herniated discs C5/C6 & C6/C7~Epidural injections (2 series of 3), OA (hands and spine)-Tylonel Arthritis, Celebrex, Fibromyalgia (diagnosis pending)
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NewteacherUNA
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2010
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/14/2010 10:18 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you so much for the link. A peanut allergy is something that I am very familiar with as my wife suffers from this. It is surprising where peanut oil is used and how many facilities use shared equipment for processing peanuts and other foods, just the equipment poses a hazard.

Red_34
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23353
   Posted 4/14/2010 11:03 AM (GMT -6)   
Yes it is and for some it can pose a deadly hazard. Also if one has an allergy to nuts they have to be careful being in restaurants as well. I have a slight allergy to hazelnuts and I have to be careful of the things I eat or drink to be sure they don't have it in it (I get a cottony feeling in my throat from hazelnuts). For my husband it's walnuts.

Oh, I almost forgot...another common allergy for children are bees/wasps especially, once again, for small children. If they go outside for recess and are allergic to bees/wasps then you have to be diligent in keeping an eye on them and be sure they have an epi pen on them or in the office at all times.
 @--->--SHERRY--<---@
Moderator for Allergies/Asthma and Co-moderator for UC
~Left sided Uc-'92-Colazal(6 daily),6mp(50-100mgs),Bentyl, Prilosec,Biotin,Forvia,Pro-Bio**Unable to tolerate ALL mesalamines**~Allergies-Singulair, Zyrtec~Secondary Reynauds Syndrome~Sacroiliitis~bulging and herniated discs C5/C6 & C6/C7~Epidural injections (2 series of 3), OA (hands and spine)-Tylonel Arthritis, Celebrex, Fibromyalgia (diagnosis pending)
To help Healingwell - click here: DONATE
 
 
 
 
 

 
 


jujub
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Date Joined Mar 2003
Total Posts : 10372
   Posted 4/14/2010 12:13 PM (GMT -6)   
As a retired pediatric nurse, I'd suggest the best source for learning about your children is from their parents. Most (not all) parents are the best experts about their children.

Also, if your school district has one of those ridiculous "no tolerance" rules that doesn't allow asthmatic children to carry their own inhalers, please work to get it changed. There are times when a child doesn't have time to get to the nurses office to get their inhaler, and it could be a life/death issue for a severe asthmatic.

Chartreux
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 9602
   Posted 4/16/2010 2:15 PM (GMT -6)   
The school parties can be hard too as you have to send home reminders of what should be avoided at parties...
Good Luck to you, you sound like you care a lot and that's always good, so be confident, the first year will be your
hardest but then you'll get everything worked out from there, my daughter grew up with a heart condition (arotic stenosis)
she had open heart surgery at 12 days old, and our biggest concerns were about strep throat..strep throat
is common in children but when you have a child with a heart condition it can be so much more dangerous,
as it can go down to the heart and cause bacterial endocarditis sometimes teachers would let me know so I could get a heads up
and I always remembered those teachers with nice gifts, cuts on the hands and face
had to be treated with antibacterial soap and then she also go heat exhaustion easy here in Texas...
to this day she still has to have antibotics before dental visits ect...and I'd have to check her out early to give her the medicine.
but she 19 yrs old now in College and doing good....
**********************************************
* Asthma, Allergies, Osteoarthritis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenative Disc (Lower Lumbar S1-L3 and Cervical C5,C6, C8 and T1), Fibromyalgia, Gerd,
Enlarged Pituitary Gland, Sjogren's, Ocular Migraines, mild carpel tunnel, ect.... "Would be nice if we could use the edit button in real life"...

********>^..^<********>^..^<********>^..^<********


SnowyLynne
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 1539
   Posted 4/16/2010 3:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hopfully teachers listen now days.They didn't years ago & would refuse to let you use your medication........The kids know when they really need it.....
SnowyLynne


couchtater
Elite Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 14316
   Posted 4/16/2010 6:25 PM (GMT -6)   
I've always allowed my students with asthma to carry their inhaler until the zero tolerance rule hit.
I can't even give a cough drop. I have to give them a peppermint, then everybody gets a sore throat. ;)

Joy

NewteacherUNA
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2010
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/19/2010 8:45 AM (GMT -6)   
Chartreux,

Thanks for the post. Not every student will have special needs, but for the few that do, it should be the teacher's #1 goal to make sure each student is safe and in a healthy environment, next comes the education. Without the safe environment the education doesn't mean a thing. I can see how school parties would need to be monitored. I plan on meeting with each one of my student's families to discuss any needs that need to be addressed to make sure that everyone has a safe, healthy place to learn.

NewteacherUNA
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2010
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 4/19/2010 8:47 AM (GMT -6)   
A big thank you to all of you who took the time to post answers for me. I really am going to enjoy teaching elementary students and I want to learn as much as I possibly can in order to be a responsible teacher. Again, thanks so much!

suetoo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 395
   Posted 4/23/2010 12:42 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi!

I am an 'old' nurse/teacher, (my students are 11th/12th graders), and retiring in June. Regardless of allergy, what is vital is to know before something happens, is what to do when it does. In our school, the kids carry their own epipen or inhalers. If it is a condition that must be shared with the other kids and parents, then they can be part of the plan of what to do. I would talk to the parents, ask them what their ideal handling of their childs situation would be, write a lesson plan about the disease, an age appropriate explanation, maybe find a book, or dvd, or internet site to show the class, and then teach and practice what everyone would do in an emergency to help "Sam". Even the littlest can practice "sitting in their seat as quiet as a mouse". If it is a food allergy, involve the kids in fun nutrition, construct a menu with what Sam can eat, rather than what she can't, as you explain what will happen if she eats what she shouldn't. Kids always want to know the consequences.... tongue It's important to talk about the scary parts, like EMS or an ambulance, and role assignments, like, who will go to the office, or call 911. And about teasing, or mockery, or bullying. God Bless you in your profession, and thanks for caring enough to ask,

hugs, suetoo


God knows, even if I don't....
CNS Lupus 2005, APS, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis
Meds: Plaquenil, Neurontin, Thyroid, Piroxicam, Aspirin, Atenolol and Norvasc, Prednisone 5mg daily and Paxil, Ambien every night.


couchtater
Elite Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 14316
   Posted 4/23/2010 6:08 PM (GMT -6)   
I like that, suetoo. I think I'll use that the next time I have a child with asthma or allergies.

Joy-first grade teacher
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