does Zyrtec mask food allergy symptoms?

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pattimatti
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Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 1/9/2007 2:30 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi,  I posted on Sunday to ask if anyone knew of Singulair causing allergic reactions, and have since talked w/ Dr. about my son's swelling and hives.  We believe he had a reaction to a food, (won't be tested til Jan 23).  I wondered if anyone knows if Zyrtec can mask food allergies since it is an antihistamine, or is it only helpful for respitory allergies?  I'm worried that he will continue to have problems while we wait for his allergy test appt.
Pattie

Red_34
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23353
   Posted 1/9/2007 3:17 PM (GMT -6)   
Usually the doctors will have you stop all antihistamines so they can get a more accurate reading with the allergy tests. I'm not sure how long you should stop before the testing though so it's wise to call the docs and ask.
@--->--Sherry--<---@
Uc(Left-sided) since 1992 - Colazal, 6MP, Biotin, Forvia-In Remission (maybe? Hopefully?)
Secondary Raynauds Syndrome since 2004 -Meds - Norvasc...Fibromyalgia since 2006
Co-mod for Ulcerative Colitis.....Moderator for Allergies/Asthma
Help others such as yourself by donating to Healingwell, every penny counts!
 

 
 


pattimatti
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Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 1/11/2007 7:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for your response.  You'd think his regular doc would have said that he needed to be clear of antihistamines for the test.  But how do I keep the poor kid from swelling up if I don't know what he's allergic to and he can't have meds?  Guess I'll be calling the allergist today.  Thanks again for the heads up.  Pattie

Red_34
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23353
   Posted 1/11/2007 9:10 AM (GMT -6)   
Yes, it's a good idea to call the doc. I would think that if an allergy is severe enough that they might not want him to stop the antihistamine but normally they do say to stop antihistamines if the allergies are mild enough. Definately don't want to be swelling and miserable thats for sure! Let us know how his allergy tests come out ok?
@--->--Sherry--<---@
~Uc(Left-sided) since 1992 - Colazal, 6MP, Biotin, Forvia-In Remission~
~Secondary Raynauds Syndrome since 2004-Meds-Norvasc..Fibromyalgia since 2006~
~~Help others such as yourself by donating to Healingwell, every penny counts!~~
@--->--Co-mod for Ulcerative Colitis...Moderator for Allergies/Asthma--<---@
 

 
 


pattimatti
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Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 1/12/2007 1:12 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Red 34, I called the allergists office and found out he is not even being tested that day. It's just a consult visit, which is really frustrating. I think he's allergic to peanuts and I'm avoiding them, but what if I'm wrong and something else sends him to the er while I wait for the darn beauracracy of appts. But they did say that if he has a problem in the meantime to obviously give him an anti histamine. Do you know if a benadryl tablet would be enough for a peanut allergy? And he is supposed to be on Zyrtec for respitory allergies, and to prevent flareups with his asthma. I feel like we're in a catch 22. Anyway, thanks so much for your input. I felt like I was hitting a brick wall with the primary doc.
Pattie
stepmom to Scott-18
mom to Carter -6,
and Jenna -3


Red_34
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23353
   Posted 1/12/2007 2:36 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm not sure on how bad his allergic reactions to peanuts or any food is. If it's mild to moderate, Benedryl might work but if he reacts severly such as swelling of the body/throat/tongue then I don't think it will do the trick. Definately avoid giving him any foods that you think might trigger a reaction until you get the allergy testing. You might want to find out if Benedryl and Zyrtec can be taken together since they're both an antihistamine by asking the pharmacist or doctor. The son your talking about, is it Carter or Scott?

I can sympathize with the frustration you're feeling. Been there and done that myself lots of times! I guess the best we can do is plug along the best we can. If you don't like a doctor then by all means change. There are good docs and then there's bad doctors........the challenge is trying to find the right one for you.
@--->--Sherry--<---@
~Uc(Left-sided) since 1992 - Colazal, 6MP, Biotin, Forvia-In Remission~
~Secondary Raynauds Syndrome since 2004-Meds-Norvasc..Fibromyalgia since 2006~
~~Help others such as yourself by donating to Healingwell, every penny counts!~~
@--->--Co-mod for Ulcerative Colitis...Moderator for Allergies/Asthma--<---@
 

 
 


pattimatti
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 1/15/2007 9:15 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi again, It's my little guy, Carter.  He had really bad asthma problems as a baby and toddler so I quit my job working at a daycare, that I brought him to also.(Major cesspool of germs that caused alot of illness and asthma problems). He gradually got better to where he wasn't having actual attacks.  Then he started with the nasal allergies, then started coughing all the time.  Started being treated with Zyrtec, then added Singulair.  Just added Flovent and that's when this food allergy started.
  It sems like we can't conquer one thing before another thing pops up.  His reactions were swelling of the lips, hives, and possibly stomachaches.  He's had alot of the belly aches lately although I'm not sure they're related.  We gave him Benadryl then and it didn't make the swelling and hives go away, but maybe kept them from getting worse.  I've heard that the reactions get worse everytime they have them.  I haven't given him anything with peanut butter since I found out that these reactions were common for that allergy, and he's been fine since. It's a bit nerve racking sending him to school.  Anyway thanks for listening. 
Pattie
stepmom to Scott-18
mom to Carter -6,
and Jenna -3


Red_34
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Date Joined Apr 2004
Total Posts : 23353
   Posted 1/15/2007 9:41 AM (GMT -6)   
Do the teachers know that he may have a possible peanut allergy? If so, then most schools are pretty good about that. I know in my daughters school if a kid has a peanut allergy, they send several notes to the parents. Yes, I've heard that reactions can get worse over time too and you're doing a great job in keeping him away from possible allergens.
@--->--Sherry--<---@
~Uc(Left-sided) since 1992 - Colazal, 6MP, Biotin, Forvia-In Remission~
~Secondary Raynauds Syndrome since 2004-Meds-Norvasc..Fibromyalgia since 2006~
~~Help others such as yourself by donating to Healingwell, every penny counts!~~
@--->--Co-mod for Ulcerative Colitis...Moderator for Allergies/Asthma--<---@
 

 
 


pattimatti
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 1/16/2007 8:28 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the encouragement. I did send a note in and dropped off Benadryl tablets to the nurse in case he has a reaction there. Then I read that liquid is better cuz it gets in their system faster. Praise God, I get to stay home with my kids! I don't know how I'd get all this running around done otherwise. I'm waitng for the consult with the allergist before I talk to the school about epi-pens etc. Maybe he was allergic to something obscure and they won't need to worry about it. Hope all is well with you and yours. God Bless!
Pattie
stepmom to Scott-18
mom to Carter -6,
and Jenna -3


danneva
New Member


Date Joined May 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 6/27/2010 10:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Lately, I've found that I am allergic to peanuts. I just want to share these.
Peanuts aren't actually a true nut; they're a legume (in the same family as peas and lentils). But the proteins in peanuts are similar in structure to those in tree nuts.
For this reason, people who are allergic to peanuts can also be allergic to tree nuts, such as almonds, Brazil nuts, walnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, pistachios, pecans, and cashews. Peanut allergy is common, especially in children.
Peanut allergy symptoms can range from a minor irritation to a life-threatening reaction (anaphylaxis). For some people with peanut allergy, even tiny amounts of peanuts can cause a serious reaction. An allergic response to peanuts usually occurs within minutes after exposure, and symptoms range from mild to severe.
Peanut allergy symptoms can include:
-skin reactions such as hives, redness or swelling
–itching or tingling in or around the mouth and throat
–digestive problems such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea or vomiting
–tightening of the chest
–shortness of breath or wheezing
–runny or stuffy nose.
The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid peanuts and peanut products altogether. For a minor allergic reaction, over-the-counter or prescribed antihistamine may help reduce symptoms. For a severe allergic reaction, you may need an emergency injection of epinephrine and a trip to emergency room. You must carry an EpiPen anywhere you go.
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