Moments of clarity

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Evygram
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2014
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/18/2014 7:48 PM (GMT -6)   
My husband was diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2007. He was only 60 when he was diagnosed. He is in late stage now and is on Hospice care. He has been unable to talk or do anything for himself since 2012. And, he hasn't known me for many many months. However, in the past couple of weeks, there seems to be some slight recognition when he sees me. His Hospice worker said that he was more alert and made eye contact when she was with him this week.

One of my dear friends, whose husband just died of AD at age 61, told me there are often moments of clarity near the end of life.

I read a few posts on this site about loved ones even talking briefly with complete clarity, making sense.

What are your experiences. I feel very conflicted. On one hand, I want to be with him all the time in case he does this. On the other hand, I don't want to visit my husband because it breaks my heart for him to have any recognition of me. I have adjusted to him not knowing me and, for some reason, it really bothers me that he is showing any recognition.

As usual, Alzheimers is confounding and incredibly sad.

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4764
   Posted 9/19/2014 6:12 AM (GMT -6)   
My dad is much more clear in mornings than he is late in the day... But he also has Sundowners syndrome.

He sees little people in room that watch tv with him and such.

I and my sister learned a while back to not bother correcting him when he called us by other peoples names and or didn't know who were are.

The really sad part is that in the mornings is when he "Knows" he's going downhill and wishes God would just take him home... Late in the day he speaks mostly gibberish..

Evygram
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2014
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/19/2014 4:31 PM (GMT -6)   
I remember when my husband was in that stage. He would imagine that he saw his father coming into his nursing home. This was not a good thing because his father was very violent and it would send my husband into fear and panic. He did have sundownners when he was in earlier stage Alz. Bless you while you go through this disease!

rufous57
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 164
   Posted 9/27/2014 8:23 PM (GMT -6)   
I can just imagine how heartbreaking it is when your DH can't recognize you! Hugs to you both! My MIL is in the later stages of dementia, her doctors never bothered to diagnose what was the cause of her dementia. Most of the time, she was able to at least recognize me, though she could not say my name, nor the names of my boys, her only grandchildren. Nowadays, she knows she is confused, but alternately, she says she saw her mother and father and that she is sick and tired of living at the Memory Care Unit, she wants to "quit" because she is tired of "working there". Lately in the afternoons, she doesnt' speak at all, she just sits in her wheelchair looking for her keys and money. She can do this for hours. It is so hard for DH to watch, he had a stroke this past May due to the stress of taking care of his mother. So I sure hope you have a good support system and are caring for your own health!!! My heart goes out to you both! Take care, Ruth
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