ATIVAN IS NOT YOUR FRIEND

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Denim
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 428
   Posted 9/8/2007 3:35 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi all, I am reposting in case no one read of my sucess as well as my husband's in getting off of this drug. I am stating this because what the both of us have found to be alarming
changes, for the BETTER!!!
 
He, as I have said suffered for almost 2 years from daily panic attacks. He read from the same doctor I found  out, that Kitt recommended that ativan causes a spike in your blood sugar and a rapid drop.
 
For my husband, it was the panic attacks. As soon as he stopped the ativan, guess what, the panic stopped!!!
 
For me, I too was taking ativan, for pain relief and anxiety. I found myself crying WAY too much. But I thought, well, I have things to feel bad about and I am an emotional person.
Guess what? The very next day that I cut my ativan dose in 1/2 by switching to 1/2 of valium, was the best and first day in a long time, with NO crying and it has been that way since.
 
We told our doctor, he didn't know. And all I can say is thank you Kitt for recommending the schedule to get off ativan by switching slowly to valium. It works.
Myself and husband are proof!!!
 
Blessings Kitt, Lynn and all who have given me such great support, advise and encouragement for some very DARK days. I blame it on ativan in our cases.
 

debaser
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1745
   Posted 9/8/2007 7:43 PM (GMT -7)   
Ativan may not be your friend, but it helps a lot of people.

Thing is, it's not made to take daily for any length of time. It's an "as-needed" drug, but doctors often prescribe it as a daily thing. That doesn't usually turn out well as it's half-life is so short that it lends itself to tolerance, which of course means the patient will need to increase their dose to maintain efficacy. That's not a good situation to be in.

It, like Xanax, is made to stop panic attacks, acute mania, etc. If a person is having a LOT of panic attacks, they should be on a long-acting BZ that will accumulate and maintain the disorder. I'm not a doctor but I can read, and I doubt there's many illiterate doctors out there so I can't figure out how these drugs keep being mis-prescribed. Ativan's fine if you have a panic attack every few days or something. It'll work really well for that. Let's say someone has a phobia of flying but they have to do so on a fairly regular basis for work. By definition they get really intense anxiety or even panic every time they have to fly. Ativan would be ideal to treat that unless you're the pilot (which would be kind or a weird career choice) or something and are on a plane several times a week.

It's not surprising at all that you're both doing well on the Valium. If I can risk making a blanket statement, any regular poster on this board probably has a daily battle with high anxiety or panic. And in that case, as long as depression isn't predominant, then if you're on a short-acting benzodiazepine you should consult with your doctor. Xanax, Ativan, Serax...re-evaluate. At least think about it.
My Brain: My friend, My enemy: A blog to chronicle my attempt to recover from anxiety/panic disorder
anxietypanicdisorder.blogspot.com/


Denim
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 428
   Posted 9/8/2007 8:15 PM (GMT -7)   
debaser said...
Ativan may not be your friend, but it helps a lot of people.

Thing is, it's not made to take daily for any length of time. It's an "as-needed" drug, but doctors often prescribe it as a daily thing. That doesn't usually turn out well as it's half-life is so short that it lends itself to tolerance, which of course means the patient will need to increase their dose to maintain efficacy. That's not a good situation to be in.

It, like Xanax, is made to stop panic attacks, acute mania, etc. If a person is having a LOT of panic attacks, they should be on a long-acting BZ that will accumulate and maintain the disorder. I'm not a doctor but I can read, and I doubt there's many illiterate doctors out there so I can't figure out how these drugs keep being mis-prescribed. Ativan's fine if you have a panic attack every few days or something. It'll work really well for that. Let's say someone has a phobia of flying but they have to do so on a fairly regular basis for work. By definition they get really intense anxiety or even panic every time they have to fly. Ativan would be ideal to treat that unless you're the pilot (which would be kind or a weird career choice) or something and are on a plane several times a week.

It's not surprising at all that you're both doing well on the Valium. If I can risk making a blanket statement, any regular poster on this board probably has a daily battle with high anxiety or panic. And in that case, as long as depression isn't predominant, then if you're on a short-acting benzodiazepine you should consult with your doctor. Xanax, Ativan, Serax...re-evaluate. At least think about it.

Thanks for your reply. Yes, he was given it after his first panic attack and ssris didn't agree with him. But the doctor prescribing it never warned us to not take it long, many docs don't even know.
Here is another problem, I want to throw in or if needed will make it a separate thread.
He is hardly taking any valium and is falling asleep and has been unsteady on his feet!! Have you ever heard of this? Yet if he takes so little, yesterday for the first time did he feel a little panic type beginning symtoms, then took the valium and it left. He wants eventually to be off of it entirely.
Thanks for any replies.
It's only about 2 weeks that he's totally off ativan and we read that it can take very long to clear your body.

Swallow your pride, you will not die, it's not poison.- Bob Dylan 


debaser
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1745
   Posted 9/8/2007 8:35 PM (GMT -7)   
I don't know about the falling asleep when he doesn't take valium, but being unsteady on his feet could be a couple things:

1) it's a common side effect when first taking a benzo.
2) it's a withdrawal symptom

Since he's been on ativan it's my unprofessional and unqualified opinion that we can rule out #1. It's likely #2 that's giving him problems because he needs his Valium dose to be equivalent to what his ativan was. Even then there will be some withdrawal for some people, so that dose should be taken until his condition is stabilized. THEN a taper can begin.

You say he's hardly taking any Valium, but this confuses me. Why not? Again, he needs an equivalent dose to the ativan, stabilize on that dose, and then begin tapering. There's no other way to do it without causing a good deal of needless misery. The taper is indeed a long process and it needs to be adhered to strictly. NEVER go too fast. Better too slow than too fast.

Again, if he's using Valium to get off of Ativan, then he needs to be taking the Valium regularly. Consult a doctor. Any doctor worth his diploma will say the same thing, guaranteed. No skipping doses.
My Brain: My friend, My enemy: A blog to chronicle my attempt to recover from anxiety/panic disorder
anxietypanicdisorder.blogspot.com/


Denim
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 428
   Posted 9/9/2007 1:33 AM (GMT -7)   
debaser said...
I don't know about the falling asleep when he doesn't take valium, but being unsteady on his feet could be a couple things:

1) it's a common side effect when first taking a benzo.
2) it's a withdrawal symptom

Since he's been on ativan it's my unprofessional and unqualified opinion that we can rule out #1. It's likely #2 that's giving him problems because he needs his Valium dose to be equivalent to what his ativan was. Even then there will be some withdrawal for some people, so that dose should be taken until his condition is stabilized. THEN a taper can begin.

You say he's hardly taking any Valium, but this confuses me. Why not? Again, he needs an equivalent dose to the ativan, stabilize on that dose, and then begin tapering. There's no other way to do it without causing a good deal of needless misery. The taper is indeed a long process and it needs to be adhered to strictly. NEVER go too fast. Better too slow than too fast.

Again, if he's using Valium to get off of Ativan, then he needs to be taking the Valium regularly. Consult a doctor. Any doctor worth his diploma will say the same thing, guaranteed. No skipping doses.

Yes, we know all of this, thank you though.
I and my husband think it is partly due to a withdrawal symptom.
He wasn't taking the equivilant because it was knocking him out!
I think it's a rare thing and that's how his body is reacting to the switch. He is very sensitive to the valium.
I just wanted to know if others experienced this.
I believe I told you in my earlier post all of this, that it felt like it was too much for him.
If you took it and were falling asleep at the drop of of hat, without even realizing it and couldn't walk straight, would you continue at that dose? I don't think I would, he felt terrible. So he tried less, it made total sense.
I think he is going through the hardest part now, which we read is after 2 weeks off of it.
But thanks for replying.
Blessings,
Barbara

Swallow your pride, you will not die, it's not poison.- Bob Dylan 


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 9/9/2007 7:28 AM (GMT -7)   

Hey Barbara,

Good Morning. Thank you for the nice comments.  You are the two doing all the work. I am proud of you and glad Healing Well was here for you as it was for me.

Debaser has some good points. However, the rate of tapering should never be rigid but should be flexible and controlled by the patient, not the doctor, according to the patient's individual needs which are different in every case.

You should always be working together with your physician but remember as a patient you have a right in making any healthcare decisions in your treatment.
 
Antibiotics for some reason, sometimes seem to aggravate withdrawal symptoms.
 
I hope we can help you through this issue with a little more info re questions about the meds you husband is taking.
 
Special Hugs to you and keep posting.
 
Respectfully
Kitt
Moderator Anxiety ~ Panic Disorders
*~* Not a mental health professional at all *~*
Dx: Anxiety/Panic, Depression 
******www.healingwell.com/donate******
_____________________________________________________
"If you doubt you can accomplish something, then you can’t accomplish it. You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.” 
~Rosalyn Carter

 


debaser
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1745
   Posted 9/10/2007 12:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Denim,

Yes, I would continue taking the equivalent Valium dose because that side effect will generally begin to dissipate within a few days. You have to allow your body to adjust to the new medication. The whole point of the Valium switch is to avoid what you're referring to as the hardest part.

Kitt,

I worded that really poorly. What I meant was is that once the taper off valium begins, only the patient can know when they're stabilized and can take the next step. Not even a doctor should tell them to cut to the next step before they're ready. Instead of saying "adhered to strictly" perhaps I should've said "a commitment to the taper is necessary". The time frame is going to vary by individual and will vary, of course. There's nothing in regard to a schedule that should be adhered to strictly.
My Brain: My friend, My enemy: A blog to chronicle my attempt to recover from anxiety/panic disorder
anxietypanicdisorder.blogspot.com/


peacesoul
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 2446
   Posted 9/10/2007 4:46 AM (GMT -7)   
debaser said...
Denim,

Yes, I would continue taking the equivalent Valium dose because that side effect will generally begin to dissipate within a few days. You have to allow your body to adjust to the new medication. The whole point of the Valium switch is to avoid what you're referring to as the hardest part.

Kitt,

I worded that really poorly. What I meant was is that once the taper off valium begins, only the patient can know when they're stabilized and can take the next step. Not even a doctor should tell them to cut to the next step before they're ready. Instead of saying "adhered to strictly" perhaps I should've said "a commitment to the taper is necessary". The time frame is going to vary by individual and will vary, of course. There's nothing in regard to a schedule that should be adhered to strictly.

I'm confused....Your comment to me in this thread goes against what you're stating here.
 

Howlyncat
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 24909
   Posted 9/10/2007 5:04 AM (GMT -7)   
THE doctor was still involved in this process I believe

I know that my hubby ( diabetic ) was on ativan one dose said he felt like he was all "Buggy" told doc and doc had him switched immediately to Valium

I have no ide Peacesoul who the comments from a couple of threads are directed at but PLEASE do be more specific .....and it might clear my fog ......thanks
    Contribute today to support Healing Well Forums...Donate @
 
Moderator for Anxiety /Panic
Moderator for Alzheimer's
Co Moderator for Crohns Disease 
 
 DX with Crohns, Pyoderma Gangrenosum,Anxiety /Panic
 
  
          Be Thankful for the Difficult times..During those times we GROW
 
                 EMPATHY is Always Better than APATHY
 
                 " Friends Are Cheaper Than Therapists "
 
  
                                  


Howlyncat
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 24909
   Posted 9/10/2007 5:07 AM (GMT -7)   
Ativan is not a good med for the elderly that are becoming confused or showing signs of AD it will enhance the symptoms and make them more aggitated this I DO know from Personal experience Doctors intervention ect....

Me Ativan is needed for one of my blood diseases to slow rate of blood to body and to the open gaping sores
Please this need not ugly ......ativan has its good and bad as does most meds.....IMHO


    Contribute today to support Healing Well Forums...Donate @
 
Moderator for Anxiety /Panic
Moderator for Alzheimer's
Co Moderator for Crohns Disease 
 
 DX with Crohns, Pyoderma Gangrenosum,Anxiety /Panic
 
  
          Be Thankful for the Difficult times..During those times we GROW
 
                 EMPATHY is Always Better than APATHY
 
                 " Friends Are Cheaper Than Therapists "
 
  
                                  


debaser
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1745
   Posted 9/10/2007 6:03 AM (GMT -7)   
peacesoul said...
debaser said...

Denim,

Yes, I would continue taking the equivalent Valium dose because that side effect will generally begin to dissipate within a few days. You have to allow your body to adjust to the new medication. The whole point of the Valium switch is to avoid what you're referring to as the hardest part.

Kitt,

I worded that really poorly. What I meant was is that once the taper off valium begins, only the patient can know when they're stabilized and can take the next step. Not even a doctor should tell them to cut to the next step before they're ready. Instead of saying "adhered to strictly" perhaps I should've said "a commitment to the taper is necessary". The time frame is going to vary by individual and will vary, of course. There's nothing in regard to a schedule that should be adhered to strictly.


I'm confused....Your comment to me in this thread goes against what you're stating here.

Maybe you can explain?!
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=9&m=904817




I don't see any contradictions. Can you be more specific?
My Brain: My friend, My enemy: A blog to chronicle my attempt to recover from anxiety/panic disorder
anxietypanicdisorder.blogspot.com/


Howlyncat
Elite Member


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 24909
   Posted 9/10/2007 6:18 AM (GMT -7)   
Apparently going against what we have said in other posts from what i see .........i am confused


    Contribute today to support Healing Well Forums...Donate @
 
Moderator for Anxiety /Panic
Moderator for Alzheimer's
Co Moderator for Crohns Disease 
 
 DX with Crohns, Pyoderma Gangrenosum,Anxiety /Panic
 
  
          Be Thankful for the Difficult times..During those times we GROW
 
                 EMPATHY is Always Better than APATHY
 
                 " Friends Are Cheaper Than Therapists "
 
  
                                  


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 9/10/2007 6:45 AM (GMT -7)   

Good Morning All,

I am a bit confused to, was it in my post as I may have written something that was confusing and if I did I apologize.

Thanks.

 


Respectfully
Kitt
Moderator Anxiety ~ Panic Disorders
*~* Not a mental health professional at all *~*
Dx: Anxiety/Panic, Depression 
******www.healingwell.com/donate******
_____________________________________________________
"If you doubt you can accomplish something, then you can’t accomplish it. You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.” 
~Rosalyn Carter

 


debaser
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1745
   Posted 9/10/2007 6:54 AM (GMT -7)   
No, peacesoul thinks I have contradicted myself from another thread. I'm confused because I don't know which statements in question.
My Brain: My friend, My enemy: A blog to chronicle my attempt to recover from anxiety/panic disorder
anxietypanicdisorder.blogspot.com/


Denim
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 428
   Posted 9/10/2007 2:13 PM (GMT -7)   
debaser said...
Denim,

Yes, I would continue taking the equivalent Valium dose because that side effect will generally begin to dissipate within a few days. You have to allow your body to adjust to the new medication. The whole point of the Valium switch is to avoid what you're referring to as the hardest part.

Kitt,

I worded that really poorly. What I meant was is that once the taper off valium begins, only the patient can know when they're stabilized and can take the next step. Not even a doctor should tell them to cut to the next step before they're ready. Instead of saying "adhered to strictly" perhaps I should've said "a commitment to the taper is necessary". The time frame is going to vary by individual and will vary, of course. There's nothing in regard to a schedule that should be adhered to strictly.

Thank u.

Swallow your pride, you will not die, it's not poison.- Bob Dylan 

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Monday, December 05, 2016 3:31 AM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,732,879 posts in 301,067 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151221 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, SammyElla.
220 Guest(s), 1 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
tdnjam


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer