Hyperventilating vs. Hypoventilating

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

kman543210
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 126
   Posted 11/8/2007 8:43 PM (GMT -7)   
Does anyone know what the main differences are in the symptoms between hyperventilation and hypoaventilation?  I know that when you overbreathe, your hands and lips can tingle.  What are some other symptoms and differences?

Danxiety
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 322
   Posted 11/8/2007 10:18 PM (GMT -7)   
hey kman_

I dont know the difference but that's an interesting question. I'm gonna try and find out more.

dan
---
Anxiety, Panic Disorder, and Depression.

"We work on ourselves in order to help others, but also we help others in order to work on ourselves."
- Pema Chodron


Danxiety
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 322
   Posted 11/8/2007 10:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Both From Wikipedia:
Hyper:
In medicine, hyperventilation (or overbreathing) is the state of breathing faster and/or deeper than necessary, thereby reducing the carbon dioxide concentration of the blood below normal.
Hyperventilation can, but does not necessarily always cause symptoms such as numbness or tingling in the hands, feet and lips, lightheadedness, dizziness, headache, chest pain, slurred speech and sometimes fainting, particularly when accompanied by the Valsalva maneuver. Sometimes hyperventilation is induced for these same effects. Hyperventilation can sometimes be self induced for moments of needed focus and adrenaline.

Hypo:
In medicine, hypoventilation (also known as respiratory depression) occurs when ventilation is inadequate (hypo means "below") to perform needed gas exchange. It generally causes an increased concentration of carbon dioxide (hypercapnia) and respiratory acidosis. It can be caused by medical conditions, by holding one's breath, or by drugs, typically when taken in overdose. Hypoventilation may be dangerous for those with sleep apnea.
---
Anxiety, Panic Disorder, and Depression.

"We work on ourselves in order to help others, but also we help others in order to work on ourselves."
- Pema Chodron


kman543210
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 126
   Posted 11/8/2007 10:31 PM (GMT -7)   
So the biggest difference physiologically is that over breathing reduces the carbon dioxide levels, and under breathing increases them; both are dangerous I guess. I wonder what the specific symptoms of hypoventilation are because lightheadedness could be a symptom of both, so how do you tell if you're under or over breathing?

Post Edited (kman543210) : 11/8/2007 10:37:48 PM (GMT-7)


Danxiety
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 322
   Posted 11/8/2007 10:47 PM (GMT -7)   
hmmm, that's another good question. But lightheadedness can come from other things other than breathing patterns, i would think. Like if you stand up to quick, sometimes that can make you light headed. Thats has more to do with the blood flood flow.

Are you worried that you might be doing one or the other?

dan
---
Anxiety, Panic Disorder, and Depression.

"We work on ourselves in order to help others, but also we help others in order to work on ourselves."
- Pema Chodron


kman543210
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2007
Total Posts : 126
   Posted 11/8/2007 10:55 PM (GMT -7)   
Well, I have a neuro-muscular disease involving my motor nerves, but they can't figure out what's wrong. I have difficulty swallowing and breathing. My FVC was reduced back in September, but I was hospitalized after a trip to the ER las weekend, and my FVC was down to 58%. I'm having problems regulating my breathing and can't figure out if I'm over or underbreathing because I can't feel myself breathing through the nose. I may end up in the ER again due to it.

Danxiety
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 322
   Posted 11/8/2007 11:04 PM (GMT -7)   
Totally understandable. I would do whatever it takes to make yourself feel more comfortable.

keep us posted kman.
dan
---
Anxiety, Panic Disorder, and Depression.

"We work on ourselves in order to help others, but also we help others in order to work on ourselves."
- Pema Chodron


stkitt
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 32602
   Posted 11/10/2007 9:22 PM (GMT -7)   

Hi there,

This is Kitt and I am sorry your having respiratory problems.........I am sure this is affecting your anxiety level.

FVC - Forced Vital Capacity - after you have  has taken in the deepest possible breath, this is the volume of air which can be forcibly and maximally exhaled out of the lungs until no more can be expired. FVC is usually expressed in units called liters. This PFT value is critically important in the diagnosis of obstructive and restrictive diseases.

If the patient has an obstructive disease, the amount of air in the lungs will not be readily exhaled because of physical obstruction and airway collapse during exhalation (loss of elastic recoil of the lungs). FVC is, therefore, an important PFT value to look at when evaluating the presence of obstructive pathology. In obstructive diseases, the lung's air volume will be more slowly expelled and will be a smaller volume over the time course of the FVC test than would be expected in a normal, healthy individual.
 
With restrictive lung disease, the FVC will be smaller because the amount of air that can be forcefully inhaled or exhaled from the lungs is smaller to start with because of disease. This may be due to the fact that thoracic cage does not have the ability to expand very much. FVC will therefore be smaller due to mechanical limitations. However, since FVC will be smaller in obstructive disorders and in restrictive disorders  FVC alone cannot be used to diagnose obstructive and restrictive disorders all by itself. Reference: Pulmonary Function Testing; Medical Surgical Nursing; Williams and Hopper 2nd Edition
 
Hope this gives you a bit of info on FVC.  Keep working with your physician on determining the cause. Keep posting as we are here to support you.
 
Moderator Anxiety ~ Panic Disorders
*~* Not a mental health professional at all *~*
Dx: Anxiety/Panic, Depression, GERD, Osteoarthritis
*Wife of a Crohnie*
******www.healingwell.com/donate***
It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver.~Mahatma Gandhi~
 

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Thursday, December 08, 2016 1:04 AM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,734,543 posts in 301,224 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 151337 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, hellokd10.
168 Guest(s), 3 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Girlie, platinumpixie, celebrate life


Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook  Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter  Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
Advertisement
Advertisement

©1996-2016 HealingWell.com LLC  All rights reserved.

Advertise | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer