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Posted By : mrb2223 - 8/17/2017 2:16 PM
Hi All,

My name is Mia. I am new to this board. My husband is believed to have mild ITP (low platelets) and had additional blood work done. Back in November (2016) he tested negative for ANA. However, in the blood work that was just completed at the end of July, he tested positive and had RNP antibodies.

Here are his results:
ANA Direct Positive = abnormal
RNP Antibodies >8.0 = high (0- 0.9)

Anti-DNA (DS) Ab Qn <1 = negative (0 - 9)
Smith Antibodies <0.2 = negative (0 - 0.9)
Sjogren's Anti-SS-A and Anti-SS-B <0.2 = negative (0 - 0.9)

Oddly enough he has no symptoms of ITP or Lupus/MCTD. Do these results mean he definitely has lupus/MCTD? If they run them again in 3 months, could he have different results? (That happened with the M2 Antibody test. He tested positive in November 2016 and then negative in March and July 2017.)

Thank you for reading and thank you for any input/advice.

Best,
Mia

Posted By : Lynnwood - 8/17/2017 4:50 PM
I am not familiar with ITP so can make no comments on that.

Lupus/MCTD are diagnosed more by SYMPTOMS than by blood work. Read the thread, Lupus 101, link in my signature, for more on ANA and the 11 diagnosing symptoms of Lupus.

Yes, the results could be different in 3 months.
Lynnwood, Lupus & Sjogren's Moderator, Dx: 2000
DIAGNOSING LUPUS & HW's LUPUS 101
"Life is far too important to be taken seriously." - Oscar Wilde

Posted By : mrb2223 - 8/18/2017 5:51 AM
Thank you Lynnwood for the response! I've been reading up on Lupus criteria, ANA and RNP.

And I am just a little confused. There is some contradictory information on the web. So some say if you have a positive ANA and a positive RNP without symptoms you will ultimately develop either SLE or MCTD. Others say you may never develop any autoimmune disease and the positive results may change over time. Do you know which is true?

There was someone on this forum that said their positive ANA and RNP turned to negatives when adopting what sounded like an AIP diet (no gluten, dairy, corn, soy, nightshade vegetables, etc.)

Thank you again for your help and input.

Posted By : Lynnwood - 8/18/2017 7:51 AM
There is NO evidence that a positive ANA and positive RNP will will develop an auto-immune disease that I have ever seen. (Ask your Dr, too!)

In a hurry now, but will be more through later.
Lynnwood, Lupus & Sjogren's Moderator, Dx: 2000
DIAGNOSING LUPUS & HW's LUPUS 101
"Life is far too important to be taken seriously." - Oscar Wilde

Posted By : Lynnwood - 8/18/2017 11:08 AM
Okay, this seems to make the most sense of anything I can find. www.mollysfund.org/mixed-connective-tissue-disease/.

Basically, ANA & RNP are indicators that you might have SLE / MCTD, but without symptoms the diagnosis cannot be confirmed. I supposed some Drs may choose to treat (my guess would be with Plaquenil) without symptoms, but the majority would more likely take a wait-and-see approach.

I haven't been able to locate anything that says testing positive means you are any more likely to develop symptoms than the next guy.

I also don't find anything that suggests a particular diet will affect acquisition of a disease. There is *some* indication that nightshade plants and legumes make some SLE symptoms worse, but that is just a general guideline found in the excellent Lupus book, "The Lupus Book: A Guide for Patients and Their Families", by Dr. Daniel Wallace.

(Note that we are not Drs here, just people who have had SLE/UCTD/MCTD...)

Hope that helps.
Lynnwood, Lupus & Sjogren's Moderator, Dx: 2000
DIAGNOSING LUPUS & HW's LUPUS 101
"Life is far too important to be taken seriously." - Oscar Wilde

Post Edited (Lynnwood) : 8/18/2017 11:12:51 AM (GMT-6)


Posted By : mrb2223 - 8/19/2017 5:53 AM
Thanks so much for your replies! I really appreciate it. I found that as well and that seems to report ANA/RNP meaning most accurately. Any contradictory information was either in very old journal articles or from possibly inaccurate websites.

I also spoke to my cousin who is a doctor, and he was saying that ANA is a pretty non-specific autoimmune antibody marker. While RNP can be useful for making a diagnosis with symptoms presents, without symptoms it seems that ANA/RNP just signal an active autoimmune reaction. Here's hoping my husband's autoimmune system calms down. I'm looking into lifestyle changes that may help with that. Thanks again!

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