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Posted By : tomgrierPHDfoundation - 9/12/2016 5:44 PM
Recent posted studies on F1000 ( http://f1000research.com/search?q=alan%20MacDonald&selectedDomain=posters ) show photographic evidence of both Borrelia miyamotoi (Relapsing Fever Bacteria) forming biofilms associated with amyloid plaques in over 100 Alzheimer's patients.

In addition the same thin sections of brain when re-stained for cytokeritin protein revealed Nematode worms, nematode eggs and nematode excrement in the same slides as that produced amyloid plaques and B. miyamotoi biofilms. (B. miyamotoi is not picked up on any current blood tests including Lyme tests)

The nematodes have live Borrelia bacteria in their guts,

The simple treatment in early dementia would suggest an antiparasite medicine like Albendazole and an antibiotic regimen that can pass through the blood brain barrier that is commonly used for Lyme disease such as Tinidizole and Clarithromycin or roxrithromycin.

But the damage done by nematodes (they eat brain cells) suggests that permanent damage has been done, but early stages of dementia might respond to this medicine like Kris Kristopherson.

Have any patients here responded to antiparasite medications?

Posted By : JaSanne - 9/23/2016 7:14 PM
And research refuting this:

"Lack of Evidence of Borrelia Involvement in Alzheimer's Disease"

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/182/3/1006.long
56 yr. old--CD over 44 yr. Hemi-colectomy '01; spinal cord injury '01; fistulae since '97; enteropathic arthritis, chronic pain, muscle spasms, scoliosis, rotator cuff injuries

Posted By : julymorning - 10/1/2016 11:29 PM
I read this link twice, or more accurately scanned it twice, and did not find mention of Borrelia miyamotoi, which is what the original post was about.

The lack of evidence link actually emphasized Borrelia Burgdorferi.
Fibro diagnosed '85 Lyme positive '92 untreated,Osteoporosis, COPD, Hypertension, degen. disc disease, RMSF pos. Spring 2015, Cong. Heart Failure, osteoarthritis. Treating PHY. an Internist, LLMD out of the question. Used Doxy, Zithro and Flagyl since June '15, self pulsed.

Posted By : Lanie G - 10/3/2016 11:25 AM
I just read the link that JaSanne posted and am copying the last paragraph. There is a clear description of the tests and borrelia biofilms. However, it is correct that "miyamotoi" is not mentioned.

"In summary, using a very sensitive PCR assay that is able to amplify a Borrelia-specific DNA target sequence from all B. burgdorferi sensu lato species known to cause disease in humans, we found no evidence of Borrelia organisms in brains of patients with AD.

© 2000 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America
"

taken from the article cited by JaSanne: jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/182/3/1006.long
Lanie

diabetes moderator
diabetes type 2 controlled by diet and exercise and
metformin
very low carb way of eating

Posted By : julymorning - 10/3/2016 2:15 PM
tomgrierPHDfoundation said...
Recent posted studies on F1000 ( http://f1000research.com/search?q=alan%20MacDonald&selectedDomain=posters ) show photographic evidence of both Borrelia miyamotoi (Relapsing Fever Bacteria) forming biofilms associated with amyloid plaques in over 100 Alzheimer's patients.

In addition the same thin sections of brain when re-stained for cytokeritin protein revealed Nematode worms, nematode eggs and nematode excrement in the same slides as that produced amyloid plaques and B. miyamotoi biofilms. (B. miyamotoi is not picked up on any current blood tests including Lyme tests)

The nematodes have live Borrelia bacteria in their guts,

The simple treatment in early dementia would suggest an antiparasite medicine like Albendazole and an antibiotic regimen that can pass through the blood brain barrier that is commonly used for Lyme disease such as Tinidizole and Clarithromycin or roxrithromycin.

But the damage done by nematodes (they eat brain cells) suggests that permanent damage has been done, but early stages of dementia might respond to this medicine like Kris Kristopherson.

Have any patients here responded to antiparasite medications?


To answer your question. You'll need to read the whole article:
/durayresearch.wordpress.com/about-2/7-provocative-findings-intro/

Posted By : jerryrosen - 10/8/2016 11:00 AM
Commenting on the original post, I think this is super interesting. I wonder how experimental it is to try this course of medication and how hard it is to get your hands on. Especially if you catch it early, there can't be that much damage done, right?

Posted By : elenacook - 10/27/2016 9:48 AM
Hi all

I posted about the excellent research linking Borrelia bacteria and nematode worms to Alzheimers some weeks ago.

Re the study mentioned as one that refutes this work - a couple of points.

1. That study (by Marques et al) was done over 15 yrs ago. This present research is from 2015-2016, ie very recent work.

2. The method used to find the Borrelia bacteria is a highly specific method in which false positives are almost impossible.

The method used is called FISH (Fluorescent in situ DNA hybridisation) and involved Molecular Beacon DNA probes specific for 2 species of Borrelia bacteria (Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia miyamotoi, associated with Lyme disease and Relapsing Fever)

The probes are short stretches of DNA bound to a fluorescent chemical. The test is based on the fact that DNA is double-stranded; one strand always pairs with its match in a very specific way.

When the stretch of DNA finds its perfect match, a chemical reaction occurs and it fluoresces. This fluorescent light can be seen under a special microscope.

DNA is made up of repeating units, like beads on a string. The Molecular Beacon DNA probes used in this study do not produce any fluorescence unless 100% of the DNA's "beads" find their correct match.

Because the sequence of units or "beads" used by the researchers does not occur in anything other than the target bacteria (Borrelia), when scientists see it fluoresce, they know they have found their target and nothing else.

So to cut a long story short - these results are very, very unlikely to indicate anything other than the fact Borrelia was present in the Alzheimer plaques of the autopsy brains studied.

3. The old paper by Marques from the year 2000 used the PCR technique, which is 1000 fold LESS sensitive than the Molecular Beacon DNA probes in this type of assay.

4. I'm aware that Adriana Marques and her team did a PCR study on this topic in which they used an inapproriate temperature for their PCR test (polymerase chain reaction).

If the wrong temperature is used, it destroys the reaction.

If people are interested, I can make efforts to verify that this is the study where Marques and colleagues used the faulty temperature. I'm 80% sure that this is the one.

5. You can find detailed information and microscope photos showing the fluorescing Borrelia bacteria in Alzheimer plaques in this Powerpoint presentation:

https://spirodementia.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/living-plaques-in-alzheimers-disease-contain-living-borrelia-biofilm.pdf
Justice will be ours.

For informative articles, please see: www.elenacookblog.wordpress.com (my site www.elenacook.org was recently down due to google reporting it as hacked - hope to have it restored eventually)
See also:
www.spirodementia.wordpress.org (Spirochaetal Alzheimer's Association)
www.durayresearch.wordpress.org (Dr MacDonald's Duray research association)

Posted By : elenacook - 10/27/2016 9:52 AM
Julymorning, the reason the Marques paper did not mention Borrelia miyamotoi is because its widespread existence in ticks was not recognised back in 2000.

It's only in the last few years that researchers have come to realise this Borrelia (which looks like Relapsing Fever borrelia genetically) is found in the same ticks that cause Lyme in Europe, US and Asia.

So when Marques did her study, the PCR she used would not have been capable of detecting Borrelia miyamotoi.

PCR tests, like FISH tests, are based on a stretch of DNA finding their correct match. Borrelia miyamotoi does not have the same DNA sequence as Borrelia burgdorferi, so the stretches of DNA used in the PCR (called "primers") would not match miyamotoi.
Justice will be ours.

For informative articles, please see: www.elenacookblog.wordpress.com (my site www.elenacook.org was recently down due to google reporting it as hacked - hope to have it restored eventually)
See also:
www.spirodementia.wordpress.org (Spirochaetal Alzheimer's Association)
www.durayresearch.wordpress.org (Dr MacDonald's Duray research association)

Posted By : JaSanne - 10/27/2016 12:42 PM
I stand corrected concerning the specific mention of Borrelia miyamotoi in the research I referenced. The title of that reference was, "Lack of Evidence of Borrelia Involvement in Alzheimer's Disease", which is available at the Oxford Journal's website, and I assumed Borrelia miyamotoi would have fallen under its Borrelia heading.
Female, late 50s--CD over 45 yrs; Hemi-colectomy '01; spinal cord injury '01; fistulae since '97; enteropathic arthritis

Posted By : elenacook - 10/28/2016 2:26 PM
Yes, that is the flawed study by Marques that I was talking about. It does not in any way disprove the evidence which has now been found over 15 years later using a much more sensitive technique.

Another important point is that that study you quoted did not even attempt to look for Borrelia miyamotoi.

The micrographs of Borrelia miyamotoi in the photos at the URL below are particularly striking. They are in Alzheimer's plaques. But not only is the Borrelia bacteria in Alzheimer's plaques, but it is occupying nearly the whole area of the plaque. You could almost say that the plaque is composed of Borrelia.

The brain plaques which are characteristic of Alzheimer's are called amyloid plaques after the protein beta-amyloid that is found in them. Mainstream thinking up till now is that the beta-amyloid somehow **causes** the dementia.

But research by Harvard professors Tanzi and Moir recently showed that the amyloid protein may well be there for a good reason - as a defence against microbes.

If you look at the images at thie URL below you will see a pair of photos labelles "A" and "B". Photo A shows an Alzheimer plaque stained to show the amyloid. Photo B shows the SAME plaque stained for Borrelia miyamotoi.

As you can see, they look almost exactly the same!

https://durayresearch.wordpress.com/about-2/seven-provocative-findings-p3/

When

Elena
Justice will be ours.

For informative articles, please see: www.elenacookblog.wordpress.com (my site www.elenacook.org was recently down due to google reporting it as hacked - hope to have it restored eventually)
See also:
www.spirodementia.wordpress.org (Spirochaetal Alzheimer's Association)
www.durayresearch.wordpress.org (Dr MacDonald's Duray research association)

Posted By : gfields - 11/29/2016 7:38 PM
Hi Elena, I noticed in one of these videos Dr. MacDonald mentioned your name. I am trying to find our more about treating neuroborrealis with anti-worm meds. This is an extremely new discovery that was made, and I don't think much is known about it currently. I was hoping you can shed more light on this, and maybe you know people who have attempted to treat neuroborrealis with anti-worm meds.

I realize that taking anti-worm meds is extremely dangerous as you can cause a herxheimer reaction in the brain and have a stroke or a seizure or have a bleed-out in the brain. I wanted to find a group of people who are currently pursuing this method of treatment and learn from their experiences, if something like this exists.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, I tried putting a single drop of Wazine into a bottle of Poland Springs. I shook it up really good, and took a small sip out of the bottle and threw the rest away. I also took a large dose of prednisone. Maybe about 40mgs.

Before the prednisone kicked in, my head pressure grew to an almost overwhelming degree. Then the prednisone kicked in, and it went away almost instantly. I felt really loopy all weekend. Actually towards the end of the weekend I thought I might have done some serious brain damage because I felt like I had schizophrenia. My thoughts weren't making any sense at all. In addition to the prednisone and anti-worm meds, I also took doxycycline.

At any rate, it was quite an intense herxheimer reaction. I eventually recovered with a lot of sleep.

I suppose I will continue to treat with anti-worm meds. I'd just like to have some other people to converse with about this treatment procedure. It's kind of like traveling down an untraveled path. Don't know what to expect around the bend.

I don't have much of a choice, but to do this. I truly believe I am developing alzheimers. If I don't do this, I think I will lose my mind. At any rate, I'd like to find out as much information as I can about this type of treatment. Any information at all is very helpful.

Also, I was reading about mefenamic acid being a cure for alzheimers for mice. I would like to try some of this to see if it might reduce my brain swelling. Of course, there's no way my doctor would prescribe me this. I was thinking about trying to buy it from a Canadian pharmacy with a fake prescription. Not sure how else to get it.

http://www.sciencealert.com/a-painkiller-has-been-shown-to-stop-symptoms-of-alzheimer-s-in-mice

Post Edited (gfields) : 11/29/2016 6:46:05 PM (GMT-7)


Posted By : elenacook - 11/30/2016 12:56 PM
There is currently a treatment trial in progress. This is not organised by the Duray foundation so unfortunately it is only open to patients are self-funding, based in midwest USA (or have a doctor willing to work with a doctor in that region) and meet certain criteria.

There is a **potential** risk that anti-parasitics can cause a massive inflammatory reaction in the brain from die-off. This is the reason steroids might be prescribed during anti-worm therapy.

I would not advise anyone who is not a medical professional to self-treat, and please be aware that self-treating with steroids can be extremely hazardous in itself.

I believe the way forward is for people to support the Duray foundation so it can conduct trials and more research, for us to campaign for transparency in Borrelia medicine.

I believe that information that could and should have been used to save countless patients from unnecessary suffering or death has been with-held for political reasons. This has got to stop, but it will only stop when we speak out.

Elena Cook
(personal capacity)
Justice will be ours.

For informative articles, please see: www.elenacookblog.wordpress.com (my site www.elenacook.org was recently down due to google reporting it as hacked - hope to have it restored eventually)
See also:
www.spirodementia.wordpress.org (Spirochaetal Alzheimer's Association)
www.durayresearch.wordpress.org (Dr MacDonald's Duray research association)

Posted By : elenacook - 2/5/2017 10:53 AM
The important topic of Borrelia as a cause of Alzheimer's has recently received attention in an article by Melinda Wenner Moyer, who writes for Scientific American and other publications.

The article, published at science news site aeon.co , describes how Harvard professor Richard Moir feels that researchers are beginning to wake up to alternative views of the cause of Alzheimers, now that decades of research and mountains of dollars have failed to produce a single drug that can halt the brain degeneration of Alzheimer's.

Like his colleague, the noted Alzheimer's expert Prof. Tanzi, he believes that beta-amyloid could well be part of the body's natural defence against invading microbes.

"At a neurodegeneration conference held in Korea in 2016, Moir says attendees were asked to raise their hands if they thought infections might be involved in Alzheimer’s, and a majority of hands went up. ‘Ten years ago, it would have been four guys in a corner, all huddled together, not talking to anyone else,’ Moir says. ‘My impression is that this is an idea whose time has come.’

Ms. Moyer's article is here:

https://aeon.co/essays/how-microbial-infections-might-cause-alzheimers-disease

Elena
Justice will be ours.

For informative articles, please see: www.elenacookblog.wordpress.com (my site www.elenacook.org was recently down due to google reporting it as hacked - hope to have it restored eventually)
See also:
www.spirodementia.wordpress.org (Spirochaetal Alzheimer's Association)
www.durayresearch.wordpress.org (Dr MacDonald's Duray research association)

Posted By : Psilociraptor - Yesterday 6:45 AM
A couple things off the top of my head. Marques has a track record of downplaying Lyme disease. Borrelia aren't the only pathologic agents implicated in Alzheimers. Oral spirochetosis, syphilis, candidasis, etc have also been studied in this context with positive findings. The most logical conclusion really just points to Alzheimers as a broad category for biofilm related illnesses of the brain and the correlation to various causative agents is then obviously going to change based on various geographic and demographic variables.

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