Resistant Starch?

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
74 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2  3 
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

constantpain
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 36
   Posted 8/8/2017 11:49 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello I have been following this thread for awhile. I also started the Resistant Starch because I am open to anything that comes in regards to this disease. I was diagnosed 4 years ago with RA and put on plaquenil immediately and decided on that till it got worse and then Sulfasalazine was added and recently started Enbrel, through there Safety Net foundation. Its been 8 weeks and although no side effects it hasnt helped in relieving pain. So what I was wondering Scott007, do you think that the resistant starch would help me even though I have never had inflammation. I get tested every month, Crp and Esr and always very low. I keep reading about everyone having inflammation and the resistant starch helping for that in general. I have been trying the resistant starch now for 2 months, yes am very gassy but I havent seen an improvement as of yet. I'm interested in your opinion. When I was first diagnosed my RF was 57 and now its normal but my anti-ccp is 250 which the Rheumatologist claims that its bad and I will be in a wheel chair at some point. So Im open to trying anything that may help. Thanks.

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/8/2017 1:14 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi constantpain,

One needs to be patient with the resistant starch. I started taking potato starch because I had blood in my stools and really did not expect any impact on my RA. I was pleasantly surprised when my RA pain also diminished, but I did not notice that until after about 3 months. Even then, it was not until one year later that I was able to stop all medications.

I have a good friend with severe ulcerative colitis. He was taking 100 mg of Azathioprine every day along with prednisone. He started taking potato starch about 7 months ago. He takes even more potato starch than me (I take about 140 grams per day and he takes 200 grams per day!). A few months ago, he cut his Azathioprine dose in half and just 3 weeks ago, he stopped all medications. He says that he has not felt this good in 15 years.

There is another diagnostic test that you can get - calprotectin in the feces. This will indicate the level of inflammation in your colon. Many people have inflammation in the colon and do not even know it. I like tests that do not require that I get poked with a needle (I have a phobia of needles).

Gases are also a product of bacterial fermentation in the colon. It is a sign that you are getting some good fermentation. Most of the gases (hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide) are odorless. If you are eating beans, broccoli, cauliflower, or Brussels sprouts, then hydrogen sulfide gas is also produced and can be quite odorous (smells like rotten eggs). Also, not all meat is digested in the small intestine and fermentation of meat in the colon also produces hydrogen sulfide.

So, I sincerely suggest that you continue the potato starch. I suspect that many abandon it too early. I wish you well in this effort. Feel free to ask any other question that you may have. I always try to reply within one day.

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 8/18/2017 7:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello Scott007,

I am brand new to this forum and through my search on the microbiome, found your information about resistant starch! I find the positive scientific research to date very intriguing and am continuing to research through the articles that you have mentioned!
I have had RA (diagnosed) for 5 years and am on the antibiotic protocol! I have had success up until a couple of months ago. It started again with what I thought was just another flare, but it has continued to date. Even though the antibiotics are low pulsed doses, I can only imagine that I don't have much good bacteria, even with good probiotics.
I will be starting the potato starch daily and hope to see some results in the coming months by changing my intestinal microbiome. I eat clean, tried lots of the specific dietary regimes. Eating whole foods, nothing processed, low sugars definitely makes a difference but hasn't put it to rest obviously, as it has once again raised its ugly head!
Thank you for bringing this information to light, sharing your background, wealth of knowledge and experiences!

Sunnygirl

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/19/2017 12:18 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sunnygirl

Thanks for your kind words. I have not heard of this "antibiotic protocol" that you mention. What is it for? What does the doctor say? What RA medication are you taking? My view of antibiotics has changed. I used to think that they were harmless. Sometimes when we get sick, we take antibiotics even if it we do not know if the cause is viral or bacterial. Antibiotics should really only be taken in life threatening conditions, such as pneumonia. [As an aside, there is much discussion about the benefit/"potential" side effects of vaccines. I do think that it is critical to get the childhood vaccines, but NOT the annual flu vaccine. Why do we get the flu in the winter and not the summer? Dry air! Properly humidify your home during the winter and you reduce the chance of the flu dramatically.]

It is great that you will start the potato starch. Make sure that you take enough (minimum of 100 grams) and that you take it every day. However, the antibiotics are not good. Probiotics help of course, but you are fighting an uphill battle.

Well, you absolutely have the proper perspective on diet - "whole foods, nothing processed, low sugars". Just supplement with the potato starch and you are golden. The "low sugar" part is really critical. In the year 2000, the World Health Organization published a paper with a dire warning - there is a global obesity epidemic (sometimes referred to as "globesity"), and, if left unchecked, will become the world's greatest health threat. Did anyone listen? Type 2 diabetes has more than doubled since 2000, and not just in developed nations, but in underdeveloped nations as well. Too much sugar (in the form of sugar itself or as high fructose corn syrup) and too much calorie intake relative to energy expenditure. One calorie of fat is not equal to one calorie of sugar. The body processes these differently with different metabolic pathways. My 10-year-old son and I were slightly overweight. We started a regiment of 2 meals per day with small portions and a strict adherence to one small sweet per day. The pounds have been dropping off! My son and wife take the potato starch every day as well.

I cannot stress enough that it is critical for people with autoimmune disorders to get off the immunosuppressive drugs. Many migrants have arrived in developed nations and some carry harmful bacteria or parasites that we have not been exposed to previously. Europe especially has not implemented any kind of screening protocol and tuberculosis is on the rise. So, a strong immune system is important now more than ever. I wish you well.

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 8/19/2017 3:22 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Scott007,

The antibiotic protocol is an old treatment (and a registered DMARD), that a doctor by the name of Thomas McPherson Brown used successfully, over 50 years ago! His theory was that RA was an infectious agent and he used a tetracycline antibiotic, Minocycline, in pulsed doses to put RA into remission!
When I was diagnosed with RA by my rheumatologist she wanted to give me her 3 ingredient "cocktail" to hit the RA "fast and hard"! I had read about the DMARDs and biologics and they frankly scared the hell out of me, so I researched! I found this protocol and figured it was the least toxic to my body! I had to beg my rheumatologist to allow me to try it, as her belief is, that it is "old" and slow acting! I was firm with my request to try it first, at least to see if it worked! It put me into remission for 5 years! I take 200mg Minocin, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday! Up until a couple of months ago I had no problems, then I started with what I thought was a small flare that just hasn't stopped!
I do not want to start the harsh meds if I can help it and I am doing and researching everything that I can to avoid that!
I believe a great part of RA begins in the gut and although I strive to eat clean, this is not a one solution remedy but a puzzle with many pieces to put together!
Yes, you are correct that it is an uphill battle! I thought at the time that my decision was the right one, being less toxic in many ways, but in many other ways, as far as my good bacteria goes, it likely wasn't!
My goal is to reduce the inflammation and try hard to re-stock some good bacteria! If I can do that, then maybe I can stop the protocol! Pretty scary thought being as it has been my lifeline these past 5 years!
Keep your great threads coming! Your knowledge of science is wonderful as well and is greatly appreciated!

Sunnygirl

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/20/2017 3:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sunnygirl,

Thank you again for your kind words, and for explaining the "antibiotic protocol". I did look this up and the original premise by McPherson Brown regarding RA and Minocycline is very much incomplete. Here is an excerpt from Wikipedia on this antibiotic:

"As an anti-inflammatory, minocycline inhibits apoptosis (cell death) via attenuation of TNF-alpha, downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokine output. This effect is mediated by a direct action of minocycline on the activated T cells and on microglia, which results in the decreased ability of T cells to contact microglia which impairs cytokine production in T cell-microglia signal transduction."

Here is a direct link to a scientific article on this (and there are many others as well): http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.607.9316&rep=rep1&type=pdf

So, Minocycline has the exact same target as Enbrel, i.e., TNF-alpha. When McPherson Brown was conducting research, understanding of the immune system was in its infancy. TNF-alpha had not been discovered until the 1970's, and the elucidation of its role in autoimmune disorders was only just beginning.

The science of what drugs do in the body is one of the most complex endeavors of humankind. It comprises two branches of science known as pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and pharmacodynamics (biological effects). I always stress that one should read the drug product sheet that comes in the package of every prescription drug. Most people throw it in the trash unfortunately. It is the most important document generated in the drug approval process. The FDA is the gatekeeper to ensure that drugs are both safe and effective. However, there are instances where they get it wrong because some side effects are not seen until a much wider percentage of the population takes a drug. Flecainide, an antiarrhythmic agent, killed more Americans that the number of American casualties in the Vietnam war! The FDA did get it right with Thalidomide and never approved the drug in the US, but Europe approved it and resulted in one of the most tragic events in modern medical history.

Chronic use of antibiotics can have potentially life-threatening effects. After decades of warnings about the emergence of multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria, we are now seeing examples. In Sweden, there are documented cases in recent years of newborns that have died from these super-bacteria. In Greece, it is documented that some women with urinary tract infections must now be given antibiotics by injection because the oral tablets are now ineffective. We are not just losing the battle with these lethal strains of bacteria, we are losing the war. The use of antibiotics in agriculture is even more pronounced. More and more have to be pumped into cattle and chickens, and dumped into the water of farm-raised salmon and tiger prawn.

Bacteria mutate so fast that after a dose of antibiotics, a small percentage of stronger and more resistant bacteria of that strain survive. Most of the time, the immune system finishes the job and eliminates these recalcitrant critters. However, in rare instances, the immune system fails to get the job done. A condition known as sepsis can occur, which is life-threatening.

I hope this helps in your decision-making process. It is very complex. I have studied this my entire life and I still get surprised from time to time.

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 8/20/2017 6:01 AM (GMT -7)   
Scott007,

Wow! Thank you sooo much! I did research (or thought I did), this protocol, thoroughly! I did not look at it from the view scientifically though! I had no idea that it has the same target as Enbrel! It was a matter of personal ignorance on my part due to the fact that I didn't want to go on the cocktail offered!
I do read those drug sheets that come with every prescription. I always like to know all the side effects and interactions that can occur, but just never looked deeper into the actual science!
Your background expertise and experience is so greatly appreciated as it has provided me with another view of drugs that I hadn't looked at before!
I think that it is so important that we educate ourselves as much as possible these days! I don't have much faith in doctors as far as "treating" patients today, just because they are taught by big pharma to treat the symptoms with their drugs. They don't get down to the cause of the symptoms. Don't get me wrong,
I know that doctors are not at fault because they are not nutritionally educated and that their intentions are to help those in need! We are truly fortunate to have the brilliant surgeons that are able to repair broken bodies and malfunctioning hearts, but I agree with you that we are losing the war with these super bacteria!
Again, I appreciate you sharing your knowledgeable background in this area! Keep up the great work! I enjoy your posts very much!
I will keep you updated on my progress with the potato starch! I will start with the 100 mg and see how well I tolerate it!



Sunnygirl

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/20/2017 7:22 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sunnygirl,

Thanks again! Don't be hard on yourself about the decision that you made many years ago. At the time we make any particular decision in our lives about anything, we do it based on what we believe at the time (and most of the scientific literature looks like Greek unless you are a scientist by profession). If that cocktail that they were offering was methotrexate/prednisone, then your decision was not entirely flawed. I don't know if Enbrel or Humira was offered as a choice for you, but I see biologics as the "safest" option for drug therapy. I have mentioned in a previous post that the biologics are akin to "snipers" and ultra-selective for their targets, whereas methotrexate/prednisone is akin to a "nuclear blast" on your immune system.

As for doctors and the medical profession, one should "shop" for a good doctor in the same way that they shop a good contractor to do work on their house. Some are better than others. A good doctor is one that "analyzes" and probes with questions about your specific situation. I have had 7 rheumatologists while I was being treated for RA (I moved around quite a bit due to pharmaceutical companies closing research facilities over the past 2 decades due to mergers and laying off all the employees). Only 2 out of the 7 doctors actually took sincere interest in my health. The others just squeezed my joints during the office visit, wrote another prescription for the medication, and sent me out the door.

I should mention that my big concern for biologics has nothing to do with the science. I consider the biologics to be one of the modern miracles of the pharmaceutical industry. This technology may very well be the pinnacle of science for a long time to come. My BIG concern is the cost! Healthcare systems around the world are under extreme economic pressure, which is being exacerbated by a raging global epidemic in obesity/diabetes. Try getting a prescription for Enbrel in one of the so-called "paradise" socialist countries of Europe - nearly impossible!

I am a big fan of biologics, but I am a bigger fan of potato starch. I have 8 boxes of Enbrel that have been sitting in my refrigerator for almost a year now. I am approaching my one year anniversary of being completely drug-free. I held the Enbrel just in case the RA flared up, but my confidence in potato starch is so firm now that I will checking to see if I can donate it back to the pharmacy.

Lastly, the recommended amount of potato starch is 100 grams, not 100 mg (as you mentioned in your post). I assume that this was just an oversight on your part, but wanted to make sure. I take about 150 grams per day, and I have a friend with ulcerative colitis that takes 200 grams per day. Best wishes Sunnygirl!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/23/2017 2:11 AM (GMT -7)   
For those of you that are interested in learning more about my views of healthcare, I found this great video yesterday by John McDougall, MD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rog_lLtoZUo

John McDougall is the type of doctor that is so difficult to find nowadays. McDougall is like a kindred spirit to me. He is a very good speaker and witty at times as well.

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 8/23/2017 5:53 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Scott007,

I have been to his website several times and I have read many of his articles! I will check out the video!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/23/2017 8:44 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sunnygirl,

I just found out about John McDougall yesterday and I think that he is absolutely fantastic. In this particular video, the section beginning at the 9:00 minute mark with the clip of the Scottish doctor Denis Burkitt is the "Rosetta Stone" for good health!

The slide at the 10:50 minute mark is spot on! "Big Hospital" for people with small hard pellet-like feces, and "Small Hospital" for people with soft elephant-sized stools (you seem bright, so no need to explain). McDougall and Burkitt mention "fiber". Resistant starch is a subset of the broad class of fiber. Burkitt says that the average American makes stools of 80 -130 grams per day, but people in countries where all of these "western" diseases (cancer, autoimmune disorders, diabetes, CV) are absent make stools that range from 300 - 500 grams per day. Wow!

I have not been successful in trying to convince people on this forum. "Resistant starch" appears to be a politically-incorrect term. I understand that there is a comfort zone in taking the "drugs", a "Linus blanket" of sorts. For the first year of taking potato starch (140 grams every day), I took my Enbrel injections concurrently. After a year, I was not feeling any of the typical RA pain/symptoms and stopped the injections. It has been one year now without injections and I jettisoned my Linus blanket this week (unfortunately, the pharmacist said that it cannot be used and it will be destroyed. I suspected that because of the potential for tampering or incorrect storage.)

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 8/30/2017 3:53 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Scott007,

Glad that you like the McDougall articles! I couldn't follow his diet, personally as I don't fully agree with some of his theories on fats and oils!

I think that it is very hard when you are in pain to see beyond the prescription drugs! I am trying the resistant starch, but I am going to have to go to my rheumatologist soon I think, as the Minocin slowly is not doing it's job and more and more pain and stiffness creeps in!

Her first line of medication will be methotrexate (maybe Sulfa.) as she won't give a biological first! I don't look forward to being her guinea pig but I guess that is what most of us are with RA when they are looking for something that works!

Too bad about your unused medication! It is so expensive! I did read however that it occurs all the time as either people reach remission or they cannot tolerate the medication!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 8/30/2017 5:32 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sunnygirl,

Other than the YouTube video on colon health, I have not had time yet to explore McDougall further.

Yes, you will need a prescription drug for sure. It takes time for the potato starch to restore the colon back to health. Unbeknownst to me until I read about the chemistry of the colon, I had abused my digestive tract for decades. It is not fixed in a month of potato starch.

I find it rather odd that your doctor is pushing methotrexate as a preferred therapy over biologics. It certainly cannot be based on safety concerns. Here is the FDA's drug product sheet for methotrexate: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2016/008085s066lbl.pdf
The black box warning is so long that it covers over 2 pages! This certainly sounds like concern over cost. The day will come when the healthcare system cannot afford biologics, but we are not there yet.

If you are Canadian, it may be more difficult to convince the doctor to prescribe a biologic, but not impossible. I lived in Canada for 9 years and presented such a convincing scientific argument against methotrexate that the doctor signed the approval form for Enbrel. There is nothing more powerful than an "educated" patient when it comes to visiting the doctor. It is ultimately your decision - methotrexate or biologic? If your doctor does not go along with your decision, just go to a different doctor.

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 9/7/2017 2:21 AM (GMT -7)   
For those that are interested, two significant publications came out recently.

The first is "The State of Obesity: 2017" https://www.scribd.com/document/357922222/TFAH-2017-ObesityReport-FINAL#from_embed

The report states that 38% of adults in America are clinically obese! This is a phenomenal number by any standard. The WHO stated back in 2000 that obesity was becoming a global epidemic. Obesity (and being overweight) is the main contributor to heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. The CDC stated recently that for the first time in human history a non-parasite (i.e., diabetes) now poses the greatest threat to human health (malaria was previously the #1 threat globally). The CDC also stated that 70 - 80 million Americans are in the "pre-diabetic" stage. This is a condition where the fasting-blood-glucose level has risen well above normal but insulin resistance has not yet been observed. The CDC estimates that one-third of those in the pre-diabetic stage will become insulin-resistant and diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Healthcare systems are already under great financial strain. Although insulin is relatively cheap, it is in the later stages of diabetes where the cost escalates (amputation, heart disease, kidney failure, etc.). So, the big cost to the healthcare system is yet to come as this obese sector of the population ages.

The 2nd article comes from a rather curious source - the agricultural industry!
http://www.feednavigator.com/R-D/node_1444608
"Microencapsulated sodium butyrate (MSB) supplementation enhanced intestinal barrier function of broiler birds challenged with necrotic enteritis"

If you have read about the chemistry of resistant starch in the colon, then you know that "butyrate" is one of the main products of bacterial fermentation.

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 9/7/2017 6:20 PM (GMT -7)   
Great articles Scott007!
Always informative!
I meant to reply to your previous reply concerning methotrexate over biologics, but didn't get to doing it!
I wouldn't mind some tips on that convincing scientific argument against methotrexate. You are correct to assume that I live in Canada!
We don't always have a choice of specialists such as rheumatologists, as we must be referred by our general practitioner to see one and then we get whomever is accepting patients at that given moment. If we wish to see another doctor than the one assigned, then we are put on a waiting list.
I agree that having some knowledge of the medicines and their side effects is always a powerful tool to have! I have yet to make an appointment, (in fear of the drugs and their effects), but as my flare doesn't seem to be subsiding, I may be forced to make that call!
If you have time, any tips that you think may be helpful, I would appreciate greatly!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 9/8/2017 2:19 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Sunnygirl,

First, make the appointment with the rheumatologist as soon as you can. You will need medication, but I have a strong preference for biologics.

Here are my tips:
1) Before charging out of the gate with guns blazing about expressing your opposition to methotrexate/prednisone, listen to what your doctor says and the treatment that he/she suggests. If methotrexate is the recommendation, proceed to step 2).
2) In advance of the appt., print out 2 copies of the FDA's drug product sheet for methotrexate (one for you and one to hand the doctor). Highlight with a yellow marker all of the items in the black box warning that concern you (on both copies). This shows that you have done your homework.
3) Do not carry it as a loose set of papers. Carry it in a folder. The manner in which you "present" yourself is just as important as the "content".
4) Be specific! It is too easy for a doctor to shoot down generalities, but very hard to negate specifics. Cite each item in the black box that concerns you, wait for a response for each one, and press the doctor if he/she does not respond. If the doctor tries to steer away from those black box items, be firm and steer it back.
5) You have the element of surprise on your side. Doctors are not prepared for an educated patient. It catches them off-guard.

The second paragraph of the boxed warning states very clearly: "METHOTREXATE SHOULD BE USED ONLY IN LIFE THREATENING NEOPLASTIC DISEASES, OR IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS OR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS WITH SEVERE, RECALCITRANT, DISABLING DISEASE WHICH IS NOT ADEQUATELY RESPONSIVE TO OTHER
FORMS OF THERAPY."
It could not be any clearer than this. According to this statement, "other forms of therapy" must be tried before resorting to methotrexate. Enbrel and Humira certainly qualify as other forms.

Another very significant statement in this drug product sheet is found in the CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY section: "Although methotrexate clearly ameliorates symptoms of inflammation (pain, swelling, stiffness), there is no evidence that it induces remission of rheumatoid arthritis nor has a beneficial effect been demonstrated on bone erosions and other radiologic changes which result in impaired joint use, functional disability, and deformity."
This is truly remarkable: "no evidence" of "a beneficial effect been demonstrated on bone erosions and other radiologic changes". After decades of prescribing this medication to RA patients and they still cannot provide any evidence of benefit on bone erosion!

The Drug Product Sheet is the "authoritative document" on a drug approved by the FDA. The contents must be respected by your doctor and taken seriously.

You may also want to print out the Drug Product Sheet for Enbrel. It also has a boxed warning, but it is far less dangerous and does no list "death" as a potential side affect like that of methotrexate.

In the meantime, if you have not started taking the potato starch, it is best to start right away. I know that there are many skeptics on this forum, but try it for yourself and be your own judge. The ultimate goal is to be "medication-free". It is best to take either Enbrel or Humira simultaneously with the potato starch.

Sunnygirl
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 9/8/2017 4:17 AM (GMT -7)   
Scott007,

Thank you so very much for all of your help with this! I truly appreciate your assistance and great knowledge in this area and taking the time to share it with me and all who read this! I hope that this will help others in the same situation!

I had stopped taking the potato starch last week as I started an elimination diet to see if I could reset my system! I have been very diligent about adhering strictly to the foods allowed in each stage! I am currently on day 9, but have not had any change in the symptoms of my RA! I will restart it as soon as I can reintroduce challenging foods, which is Day 14! I just wanted to follow it exactly as it is laid out to see if I had any reactions to certain foods! I did it 5 years ago when I was diagnosed! Changing my diet helped a great deal although I did not have any reactions to the foods that often can be troublesome! I wanted to try again to see if something had changed.

Potato starch is first on my list to go back into my daily routine!

I like to keep an open mind to all forms of healing! Being skeptical can be healthy in the right situations but it can also be detrimental if one never opens their mind to ALL the different possibilities, especially health, that are available to us! We are all different and what works for one may not work for another, but if you don't try, then you will never know!

Thank you again for this valuable information and your insight on health! Don't be discouraged by skeptics and keep forwarding those interesting articles!

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 9/10/2017 2:49 AM (GMT -7)   
Sorry folks, but I could not resist this one - I just read this quote. All I could think is how we have completely abandoned the role of fiber (resistant starch) in our diets and our symbiotic relationship with the 100 trillion colonic bacteria.

“The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.” ― Voltaire

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/14/2017 5:30 PM (GMT -7)   
Scott, I am new to this forum: I find your information very interesting.
1988, at 130 lbs by exercising and eating lean meats, vegetables and fruits. (was 42)
Thru the last 30 years I have gained 100 lbs, by baking for new husband (bread, cookies, pies, etc).
Forgot I was allergic to carbs. Anyway, my health has been deteriorating all these years.
In 2008 found out that I have Factor V (I make 5 x more blood clots than a normal person.)
2015: heel melanoma, no chemo, or radiation. They felt I was at # 1 stage.
Have been so tired, know depression after surgeries and healing, have dealt with IBS, and then constipation from Hydrocodone and Tramadol, but in the last few weeks dried fruit had brought my bm's back to normal.
For the last year the joint pain has been so bad that I just sat. June 30th had my 2nd episode of blood clot in right leg. Am on Xeralto and being desperate called Hematologist with our local cancer center. During my appointment he asked me to try Meloxicam 30 mg once a day. However, going back for a refill, talked with a replacement dr and he asked if I was aware of the side effects of Meloxicam (being blood clots and/or internal bleeding.) Tried to get off Meloxican but the pain was building up and I didn't want to be just sitting again. So succumbed and took 1/2 pill next morning and relief is building. I am so interested in what you are talking about regarding potato starch.
Oh forgot to say, while on the Meloxicam, I felt so well after a week that I am back at my local ymca gym and swimming hole. I am using the NuStep and can do 3 miles in 50 minutes, or 5,400 steps then I go into the pool and up to 20 minutes of water walking. I am for once dedicated - will even go to ymca on saturdays and sundays to fill in for any days that I might miss because of dr appointments.
What you say makes sense, so I am going to try this and give it several months. It will be the least offensive thing I have done trying to heal myself. Thanks Moosie

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/14/2017 7:29 PM (GMT -7)   
Wow, I just read my post and it sounds very disjointed. I do not have a rheumatologist at this time. My GP never suggested it. I am hoping my cardiologist will be able to guide me to a new rheumy?
So I am so thankful for the information on potato starch and on how to address the new specialist on taking a safer drug. I appreciate the fact that you explain things so the common man or woman in my case can understand. My joint pain is in both thumbs, both knees, all joints evenly. Just so thankful for people like you that can comment on their conditions and meds and the honesty. So thank you all. So tired of the pain, not enjoying life and a drag. Moose

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 9/15/2017 1:41 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Moosie,

First, thank you for your kind comments! You have much going on - so let me break it down one by one.

Factor V appears to be a "true" genetic disorder. While many believe autoimmune disorders to be genetic as well, I would argue to the contrary. The vast majority of autoimmune disorders are most definitely the result of a hyperactive immune system due to chronic dysfunction of the colon (i.e., butyrate deprivation, the colon's preferred source of fuel). It has been quite some time now, but I worked in the area of anticoagulants, Factor Xa in particular. I see that Xeralto (Rivaroxaban) is a Factor Xa inhibitor. You definitely do not want blood clots to develop because that can be fatal as you know.

Even though you feel better with the Meloxicam, I am definitely not fond of that medication. I read that "Meloxicam use can result in gastrointestinal toxicity and bleeding, headaches, rash, and very dark or black stool (a sign of intestinal bleeding)." Hippocrates, the ancient Greek Father of Medicine, penned that “all diseases begin in the gut”. I would not say that "all" diseases begin in the gut, but I would say "most".

The heel melanoma is difficult for me to comment. I hope that it has not metastasized and they have surgically removed the affected area.

The IBS is another sign that your gut (i.e., colon) is dysfunctional. Constipation is as well. I have never heard of someone being allergic to carbs. Was this identified by an allergist or someone qualified to make that determination? I find that hard to believe. Gluten is really only a problem for many because their colon is "leaky" from a deficiency of resistant starch.

The gain in weight is a big concern. This puts you at increased risk of diabetes. The fact that you go to the YMCA gym and try to exercise when feeling well tells me a bit about your personality. You are determined, and that is very good. That determination is your greatest strength!

So, will potato starch help for you? I would say most definitely "YES", given what you have said about your GI problems (IBS, constipation). I do not believe that potato starch will be a problem for the "alleged" allergy to carbs. Potato starch is "pure clean carbs", about 80% resistant starch and 20% digestible starch. What I mean by "pure clean carbs" is that the skin of the potato is absent from the potato starch. It is the skin of the potato that contains things that could cause problems in the GI tract.

In the beginning, potato starch can cause diarrhea, but this may be a welcome cathartic cleansing for your colon. Try to take at least 150 grams per day, and in your case 200 grams would be fine as well. The diarrhea at the beginning of potato starch is another sign of colonic dysfunction, and should be viewed as part of the healing process. It will stop after the colon is repaired.

Post Edited (Scott007) : 9/15/2017 2:44:40 AM (GMT-6)


moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/15/2017 5:05 AM (GMT -7)   
Scott007
Thank you for your prompt reply and information.
I'm sorry I confused you with the term "allergic to carbs ". I meant that if I eat one bite, I can't stay away from carbs. Be it pastry, bread, cookies, etc. It really is so hard not to eat every thing in site.
I find I do very well with basic meat and vegetables and fruit. So adding potato starch won't be a problem. The diarrhea, yes, but I am determined to feel better without pills. Again, thank you for putting things in a way that people can understand. Moosie

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 9/15/2017 6:39 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Moosie,

Ok, I understand now. Here is something to try: drink a glass of water instead of reaching for the pastry or bread. I find very often that I no longer want the pastry.

I suspect that your situation is about to take a dramatic turn for the better after you have been on the potato starch for a while. Best wishes!

moosie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2013
Total Posts : 26
   Posted 9/15/2017 5:12 PM (GMT -7)   
Scott007
Saw my cardiologist today and she is taking me off Meloxicam and on to Celebrex. She felt I wouldn't need to worry about bleeding or clots. Added potassium to take with my water pill, she didn't like my swollen legs. So hoping Celebrex at 200 mg will keep Me pain free.
Hoping to start the potato starch as soon as I find it. Thank you for your positivity. Good health to you and others. I will be watching to see what else is happening.

Scott007
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 9/16/2017 8:14 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi Moosie,

If you do indeed have RA, Celebrex will not be strong enough. A blood test for rheumatoid factor would confirm RA, but sometimes it does not show up in the early phase of RA.

Potato starch can be found in the baking section of virtually any supermarket.
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
74 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2  3 
Forum Information
Currently it is Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:23 PM (GMT -7)
There are a total of 2,895,236 posts in 317,778 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 157377 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, internaltremorcure.
320 Guest(s), 6 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Kent M., Pirouette, Michael_T, WalkingbyFaith, Terry's Cellar, Nltonz


About Us | Advertise | Donate
Newsletter | Privacy Policy & Disclaimer
Follow HealingWell.com on Facebook Follow HealingWell.com on Twitter Follow HealingWell.com on Pinterest
©1996-2017 HealingWell.com LLC  All Rights Reserved.