Question on SSD

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snobrdgrl321
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 278
   Posted 7/8/2011 2:03 PM (GMT -6)   
Question about disability.

I have been reading the website and noticed that many of my 'conditions' are on their list Of impairments. Does that mean I would automatically be approved? Prob not, but wanted to ask. I am seriously considering talking with my dr about this and stop claiming my unemployment.

Any info would be a great help!
Thx
Donna
Tethered Spinal Cord~1.5x1.2 cm spinal cord cyst at L5/S1  (Lumbar Laminectemy completed 9/10/09)~Scolosis~Migrains~Leg Deformity~Foot Deformity~Knee, Hip, Back, Neck Pain~Severe Depression~Insomenia~DDD~Artheritis (Spine)~Spinal Bone Spurs~NEW: Herniated Disc T5/T6 
"I'm not going to vacuum 'till Sears makes one
you can ride on"
~Roseane Barr~
 

Jim1969
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 2042
   Posted 7/8/2011 6:03 PM (GMT -6)   
You are right. Just because something is on the list in no way means an easy process. All that list means is that those are the conditions that SSA considers debilitating if they are severe enough.

Over 80% of people are denied SSD on their first attempt. Most of the 20% that do get approved the first time are those with terminal illnesses who rarely live long enough to collect more than a few months worth of payments. There are a few who do not fall into this category that manage a first round win, but overall they are rare.

Before you fill out the application get your basic information together.

You will need:
Medical conditions: List all chronic conditions even if they are not on the list.
Name and address of every doctor you have seen for these conditions
Name and address of every hospital or clinic you have went to for tests, procedures, therapies, etc as well as the date or time frame you were there. If you know your patient ID number from when you were there you will need that to. If not don't worry about it.
Every job you have had for the past 15 (?) years. You won't list the place of employment, but you will be asked for job title and work performed.
Finally you will be asked about what you can and can't do or have trouble doing. Why you think you are disabled, that sort of thing.

There are probably other things you will need too, but those are the ones I recall from filling out the application a few years ago. The initial application can be filled out online and it is possible to save it in progress so you don't have to complete it in one sitting. Given how big and detailed it is I imagine few do.

Finally be sure to keep some paper and a pen handy. You will be given all kinds of numbers, both when you save the application while working on it and when you complete it and send it in. These numbers are important as they are case numbers, application numbers, etc and will help you track your application if need be.
2 confirmed herniated lumbar discs. Spinal Arthritis. Spinal Stenosis, diabetic peripheral nueropathy.

snobrdgrl321
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 278
   Posted 7/8/2011 7:23 PM (GMT -6)   
So when I go to discuss this with my dr, what do I say?

Honestly, I am nervous. My conditions are well documented. I have been seeing different specialist since I was born (because I was born with an obvious deformity) it wasn't until about 2001 that they were actually able to put a name on what I have.

I guess I am nervous because I don't want him to see a beautiful (gotta tell yourself that every once in a while), young (35yr), woman and think I am nuts. Ya know?

And advice on how to talk to my dr about SSD would be appreciated.
Also... On a side note, any advice on how to talk to hubby about this would be appreciated too. (he knows I hurt, but I think he wants me to just suck it up and deal with it)

I cry almost every day due to pain of some type...
Thanks!!!!
Donna
Tethered Spinal Cord~1.5x1.2 cm spinal cord cyst at L5/S1  (Lumbar Laminectemy completed 9/10/09)~Scolosis~Migrains~Leg Deformity~Foot Deformity~Knee, Hip, Back, Neck Pain~Severe Depression~Insomenia~DDD~Artheritis (Spine)~Spinal Bone Spurs~NEW: Herniated Disc T5/T6 
"I'm not going to vacuum 'till Sears makes one
you can ride on"
~Roseane Barr~
 

Jim1969
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 2042
   Posted 7/9/2011 3:06 AM (GMT -6)   
As far as talking to your doctor about it, I would start by making an appointment to do just that. Make sure when you make the appointment that they understand what you are wanting the appointment for so they can schedule one for the "appropriate" length of time. This is one of the reasons why doctors get back logged during the day and end up keeping patients waiting for hours is because people make general appointments or say they want to see the doctor about "x" when they really want to see him about "y" or "x,y and z".

When you get to your appointment just tell him what you have been thinking about doing and why. Just be straight forward and honest. Unless your doctor is about 5 minutes out of medical school s/he has probably heard it all before anyway, so whatever you have to say is not going to come as any surprise. If anything does it may be why you have not brought it up before.

When it comes to discussing going on "permanent" disability doctors tend to follow their patients lead unless not going on it will risk a person's life at which point they may bring it up themselves. They do this because they want their patients to live as full a life as possible and are concerned if they bring it up it will cause someone to just give up on everything.

There are so many things we are all reluctant to tell our doctors about due to embarrassment of concern of being unduly judged, etc, but in the end the more open and honest we are with them the better the chance they can help.

As far as talking to your husband about this I don't know what to suggest. The best way I suppose is to just be honest and tell him what you are going to tell your doctor. Be complete and honest and maybe give your husband the benefit of the doubt that maybe his apparent attitude is because it is his way of trying to help you and/or because you have done a better job than you think at masking your symptoms. In any case be prepared to give him some time to wrap his head around things.
2 confirmed herniated lumbar discs. Spinal Arthritis. Spinal Stenosis, diabetic peripheral nueropathy.

Trudy2
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 213
   Posted 7/9/2011 8:51 AM (GMT -6)   
I am one of those lucky people that won my disability on the first round - but that was back in 2004 when I had Leukemia and it was on the list as a terminal illness. I went through a bone marrow transplant that almost killed me and it took me over a year to get back to where I could even consider something semi-normal. I was on immunosuppressant drugs for 2 years because of problems with the transplant. The transplant left me with several different conditions that all together make me disabled. BUT - I was reconsidered in 2007 and because my doctors did not respond to requests for information, I was denied.

Then I had to appeal and request to keep my benefits and ask for a reconsideration hearing before an officer of SSDI. I did that and presented her over 200 pages of documentation from my doctors and she made her decision within days of the hearing. Obviously she did not have the time to read and consider the over 200 pages of documentation. This happened in 2009.

Then I had to appeal again and this time it was for the hearing where you go before the Judge Advocate. My hearing was just done in May of 2011. It was actually a face to face hearing with a judge that flew in to Ohio to do hearings from California. He referred only to my most recent 30 or so pages of paperwork that was submitted by my current pain management physician that did agree that I am totally disabled. There was also evidence in my file that I have seen several different psychologists over the years.

At the end of this hearing - the judge was nice enough to tell me that he did consider me totally disabled and unable to work due to the many conditions that I have. You need to be honest in whatever questions are asked. If you are not, they will realize that because the doctors paperwork will not agree with whatever you say. If possible - you need to see and know what paperwork the doctors have submitted to social security.

I had my pain management physician fill out what is called a Residual Capacity Form that explained in great detail what I could and could not do - it was over 20 questions long and about 5 pages. He filled that out for me and also included documentation to support his answers with appointment notes and testing results of what I have had done since I was his patient. He even wrote in his notes that he considered me to be totally disabled several times.

Good luck and if you have any more questions - please post again!
Trudy
DX pyoderma gangrenosum, Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, Bone Marrow Transplant, Chronic Pain syndrome, Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3, Major Depressive Disorder, Radiculopathy, Bilateral Hip Pain, Insomnia,Left Groin Hernia, Bulging Disk in Lumbar Spine, Tear in Lumbar Spine, Tendonitis and Bursitis in both hips.

NiNi53
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 816
   Posted 7/9/2011 10:33 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi this Kathy from Maryland, I was turned down my first time out.  The second time I went with a disability lawyer, heres the thing with these lawyers, if they cant win, they wont take the case.
 
It was so much easier to let  a seasoned attorney do what they do best rather than me running around  not really knowing what to do.  Not just that but 11 years ago when I became totally disabiled, I was so depressed I could barely get out of bed, let alone do all that work.
 
I had a great doctor, he copied all of my records, and there had to be several hundred pages, without charge.  Now I dont know many drs that will do that but from there, I handed them to this lawyer and he called me back that same day and said, he was taking my case.  At that point I knew I would win.  I they dont win, (the lawyers) they dont get paid.  Its that simple.
 
I was very fortunate, my doctor was a wonderful person who I would still be going to if, well that another story.  And my lawyer, when we went before the board, told me what to say, what to answer.  The next thing I knew, and it was not a long time, maybe 2 weeks, he called me told me we had won.
 
Almost the next day, I received the papers telling what I would get, and from there at least my financial problem was solved.  My lawyer actually sent me 2000.00 back saying they had overpaid him.  I mean was I lucky or what.
 
So good luck to you and I hope all goes well for you, if you are worried, let the professionals do it.  Yeah it costs a little money but it saves a lot of stress.
degenerative disc disease, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, neuropathy, lumbar laminectomy july 1998 no help, rechargeable neurostimulator unit low right back w/lead wires to left side and right leg unit not working just sitting there.i am 57 years young in may will turn 58. i have 2 grown daughters, 25 and 29. i have 2 grandchildren, 9 year old grandaughter and 5 yr. old grandson

Jim1969
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 2042
   Posted 7/9/2011 11:49 AM (GMT -6)   
The one thing with SSD lawyers though is that many of them won't take a case on the original go around unless you agree to pay them up front. Some might take it on a contingency basis (only collect if you win) if they feel your case is strong enough on the first go around. Of course you never know unless you talk to them and ask.

If you do get turned down the first time then by all means "hire" an attorney, and when you do you will be better off going with one from your area rather than one of those "nationwide" firms you see advertised on TV all the time.
2 confirmed herniated lumbar discs. Spinal Arthritis. Spinal Stenosis, diabetic peripheral nueropathy.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16278
   Posted 7/10/2011 9:47 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Donna, when I was able to work, I worked as a paralegal for over 20 yrs. We handled SSD claims on our clients that were not able to go back to work as a result of their injuries.

One thing I will suggest is do not spend money hiring an atty to take your case. Instead look for a local atty that handles nothing but SSD claims in your area that takes the case on a contingency fee basis, meaning he gets paid out of your SSD claim. Do not mess with one that handles a little of this and a little of that, he will not be up to speed on any one thing in particular, he is out to make a quick buck. Do not waste your time on the bozos that advertise on tv how great they are and how many cases they have won. Those guys that advertise like that have a high volume load and have no idea who their clients are. Its a numbers thing with them, I have seen those kind and how they work. They wait till nearly the last minute and then back out of the case citing some flimsy excuse as to why they can't represent the person. By that time someone that works for the bozo has screwed something up that can be difficult to fix in a timely manner. With SSD you have time limits on nearly everything. Don't fall for their trap. Nearly all attys tell the people to go ahead and file their claim and if they get turned down to contact them once they have been denied. Always keep a copy of a everything given to SS and to an atty too.

How do you think your PCP will react to you filing for SSD? Do you think he will back you on it? Just be honest with him, he may wonder since you did go to work and worked until you were laid off. What kind of work do you do? Is it a physical type of work? Are you skilled at any other kind of work other than what you were doing when laid off? Many times if SSD is not clear on a persons disability they will send that person for an exam by one of their drs. SSD does look at a persons age and education, the younger the person the more they look at retraining the person provided they have a high school diploma or GED.

I really do not know what to say about your husband. Its hard if you don't have a supportive spouse anyway. I think with some its the loss of income they worry about.But, if the shoe was on the other foot they expect consideration. Its a tough decision to make. Good luck in whatever you decide.
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