Addicted-NEED HELP

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Hawk512
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 12/11/2011 1:12 PM (GMT -6)   
To make a long story short I have allowed myself to get addicted to oxycodone. I am up to 6 30mg oxycodone IR's at a time. I do not steal or buy on the street. My prescription is for 180 pills which gives me the six a day I am taking. I just suffer the other 20 hours a day that the oxy is not working. I have real pain and don't think that suboxone is an option. I can't take methadone and I don't know where I would stand with that as well. Also, I am on medicare and don't know what they will pay for as for as addiction treatment. I have not reached the point of snorting or shooting up so I hoping there is some sort of help for me. A little background on my pain: I have had failed surgeries on my neck and back. 2 disks were repaired in each. I cannot turn my neck more than about 45 degrees each direction and my back pain shoots into my legs numbing my left leg on the outside. I also have damaged nerves in my left arm that numbs almost every thing below my elbow. ANY advice or help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

Post Edited (Hawk512) : 12/16/2011 8:27:59 PM (GMT-7)


straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16294
   Posted 12/11/2011 2:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hawk. Welcome to Healing Well's chronic pain forum. My first thought about your problems with your medication is you need to be discussing this with your dr. I am not sure how this happened in the first place except if your pain was not under control then you should have let the dr know this way back when. You can contact Medicare directly about any type of treatment they may pay for but many times if someone goes into treatment, getting another dr to rx medications again in the future is nearly impossible. You more or less get tagged because it will show up in your medical records and no one will be willing to touch you.

I suggest you get into your dr ASAP and come clean with him/her. You did not say what kind of dr is treating you, whether its a PM dr or your PCP. Most people with CP are on a long acting pain medication, along with something for BT pain. We seem to get better coverage this way for our pain. Please understand none of us here are drs and we can only speak from personal experiences only.

I truly wonder if your addicted or have you become tolerant to the oxycodone and they simply have stopped working. There is a big difference between addiction and tolerance. Addiction is for those that obtain the drugs illegally and use them for other than medical purposes. Even today people do not know the difference, since you are not doing this, I feel you have become tolerant and probably would do much better if you had a complete change up in medication. But, one thing you need to understand is self medicating will only lead to trouble. Be honest and tell your dr when a medication is not working, they cannot read our minds. Can you see where I am coming from with this. You simply cannot just take the pills because you have them or you will end up with no dr willing to see you and have no medication that you can afford.

Make an appt with your dr and let him know the Oxycodone has stopped working but make a promise to yourself you will be responsible with your medication in the future.

Take care and keep us posted on how you are doing.
Moderator Chronic Pain Forum

sore42long
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 235
   Posted 12/11/2011 5:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hawk, I have been on oxy for more than 2yrs.Iam just now weening off with DR.plan.I tryed cutting back to one pill and became very sick .I find it strange ,you take 6 pills at atime?which means you would be in withdrawl alot.I would think if you took them every 8hrs or so it would be alot more effective.I say, ask your DR. for aplan to get off,don't make the mistake Idid for 5day.I feel you should also tell the DR. how you take the meds all at one time,I really don't feel thats how the meds are ment to be taken! Iam sure ,you need to talk to your DR.and pharmacy about your med problem you take meds has prescribed.I agree with Straydog,if you take meds the wrong way ,don't expect them to help with pain!.good luck takecare from michele

Robbie67
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 12/13/2011 9:41 PM (GMT -6)   
I've been on pain management for 2 years and each month, my GP simply increases the dosage. I'm on endone, ms-contin, Effexor, Lyrica, and durogesic patches thanks to an idiot surgeon.

Where pain management "experts" failed, my gp's attitude is to get a balance of pain meds that assists in day to day activities. I also know that ou can develop a tolerance to some pain meds where they just don't work anymore. You really should be seeing your doctor or advice and or help.

snobrdgrl321
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 278
   Posted 12/13/2011 9:53 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hawk... Just wondering, where are you located?
The reason I ask is I have read in some states (FL for one) Dr's are prescribing way more than need right off the bat... I do not doubt you are in pain an need the meds, just wondering if perhaps this is how you got into this boat... If you know what I mean.

But I do agree with the other posters, talk to your Dr.
Donna
Tethered Spinal Cord~1.5x1.2 cm spinal cord cyst at L5/S1  (Lumbar Laminectemy completed 9/10/09)~Scolosis~Migrains~Leg Deformity~Foot Deformity~Knee, Hip, Back, Neck Pain~Severe Depression~Insomenia~DDD~Artheritis (Spine)~Spinal Bone Spurs~NEW: Herniated Disc T5/T6 
"I'm not going to vacuum 'till Sears makes one
you can ride on"
~Roseane Barr~
 

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 12/14/2011 1:01 AM (GMT -6)   
hawk,

welcome aboard, this is a good first step coming here and laying out your story and situation.

i would have to say, that i totally agree with straydog's answer to you. it was well rounded and made good sense. if you are taking your full day's ration so to speak at one time, you are already abusing the intent of the prescription. and you are setting yourself off, not only to make your pain managment ineffective, but probably inducing withdrawal symptons in-betweeing your intake.

i don't know your doctor of course, but if you come clean, and tell him/her how you got in your situation, a good doctor would work with you and help you get back on the right track.

sounds like you are willing to help yourself, and that is a very important first step in getting things back undercontrol in your life.

i wish you only the best, and never give up hope. please stay in touch here, now that you are in this community.

good luck

david in sc
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos margin
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06, 2/11 1.24, 4/11 3.81, 6/11 5.8
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10

BuccPride
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 27
   Posted 12/14/2011 2:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Note: I am no doctor nor do I claim to know the pharmacology a doctor pharmacists has studied. I can only tell from personal experience as my doctor went on vacation at the time I was supposed to have my medications refilled so I had to spend 3 days in withdrawal before I was able to claim my next months prescription.

When I learned that I was going to have to go through withdrawals until my doctor returned I did some research. This in no way will break your physiological addiction but will greatly reduce the physical symptoms of withdrawal. Loperamide (Imodium) is used often for the frequent bowl movements associated with withdrawal symptoms, but few people know that loperamide is in fact an opiate. It does not cross the blood brain barrier there for it has no analgesic properties. I discovered that quinine would allow loperamide to travel across the BBB. Since quinine is prescription only (now no longer approved by the FDA for medical use) it wasn't an option. I did a little more searching and found that a proton pump inhibitor would also allow it to cross the BBB just not in the quantity of quinine. So I got some Imodium and Prilosec (Omeprazole) from a drug store. When I felt the withdrawals come on I took two 20mg Prilosec extended release, broke them in half, and swallowed them. about 30 minutes later, withdrawal symptoms in full gear, I took 16 Imodium. Within a matter of minutes 90% of the withdrawal had subsided.

Even when it crosses the BBB there are no noticeable analgesic effects. There is also no euphoria so you aren't likely to become addicted to it as well. Physically, since it's chemical structure is different from other opiates, it will take quite a while for physical dependence. Constipation is a side effect but can be counteracted quite effectively with stimulant laxative.

As I've said I am no doctor nor am I a "drug seeker." I get medications from the same doctor every time but when your faced with withdrawal, finding some way to ease the sickness becomes your number one priority.

I do not know if it's possible to use this as a way to escape withdrawals of oxycodone until they are non existent. But from my experience, I went 3 days without my medications and never felt any withdrawal.

I am merely giving you an option to try. I know what it's like to be dependent and living your life one pill at a time. I don't know the rules on this forum that well so I'm not sure if this post will get me in trouble. I just want to help if I can.

bayoub2
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2861
   Posted 12/14/2011 3:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi- old junkie talking here (very long time ago) I respectfully disagree with my esteemed colleagues. Addiction/tolerance/ it is a semantics game....if you get up and take your whole day's dose right off the bat, I have to say you are lookinng for a high, which is addiction (improper use of meds to attain a euphoric state)...if you take 6 because yr painis hat BAD, get thee to a doctor right away...msybe you have built a tolerance to oxys....just because you are not shpooting/snorting does not lessen the addiction..

Dependence/tolerance/addiction-a very very fine line...I know manylaw abiding people who run ourt early and "borrow "...

Sorry for being so cantankerous, but having spent 40 years in addiction, I scoff at law abiding folks who swear they are not addicts....if you must take that pill every day to function, you are addicted

Thanks for l;istening

Maggie
"We never realize how strong we are, until being strong is the only thing left"
Major Depressive Disorder, ptsd, fibromyalgia, chronic pain, l3/4, L4/5 gone, bursitis arthritis sciatica

cymbalta seroquel hydrocodone klonopin magnesium potassium

BuccPride
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 27
   Posted 12/14/2011 4:18 AM (GMT -6)   
bayoub 2,

I never stated that I was not addicted. If you have withdrawals you are physically addicted. I merely stated that I am not a "drug seeker" (DEA term for doctor shopping) meaning I have one doctor who monitors my medications and that's it. I am dependent on my medications to function I will be in tears from the pain in my back and hip if I do not have it. I found a different way to get through my withdrawal rather than turning to the streets and I was sharing it to perhaps save someone from jail time. I'm sorry if I made you cantankerous with my post but I hope you see that you merely miss understood.

Hawk512
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 12/16/2011 9:23 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks to everyone for their advice and help. I know that I need to manage my medications. And it is not normal to take 6 oxys at one time. It takes at least 4 pills to dull the pain and the other 2 are for the euphoria. That is where the addiction part comes in. My pain doctor is unwilling to increase my dose of oxy any more and at this point and rightfully so. I can't take fentenyl (sp) or methadone I have a bad reaction to both. At this point I don't know what to do. Like I stated before I am not snorting, shooting or doctor shopping so I still have some control. I only hope that I can get this under control before it takes away the control I have left.

Chutz
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 9090
   Posted 12/17/2011 12:56 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hawk~

I hope you are doing OK tonight. This must be very hard emotionally for you. I've not had a problem with addiction, thank the Lord, but it can happen to those of us who take narcotic medication for pain. I am humbled by your coming forward and sharing this with everyone here...complete strangers until you first said 'Hello'. Now we're a group of friends who can understand and appreciate what you are going through and offer some ideas that may help you get through it.

I do share the advice of the others. Your best outcome is likely to come from confiding in your doctor. If you need help in wording, approaching and/or getting your courage up, feel free to ask and we'll give you all the help we can.

There is a clear line between addiction/dependence/tolerance from the research I've read and by listening to forum members share their own experiences here. Below are a couple of links that explain these topics. I wanted to post these to clear up any misconceptions.

I do hope you come through this as comfortable as possible. One thing you will have in tact is your dignity. Hold your head up high for it could be any of us, your doctor included, who will be the next person to be asking for help.

Hugs,
Chutz

This first one, in my opinion, has the best description I think I've seen about these three 'words'.

www.naabt.org/faq_answers.cfm?id=15

The article begins...To understand fully you must be aware of the difference between tolerance, physical dependence, and addiction:....
I found it short and easy to read and understand.


And from the National Institute of Health ~ where you can find extremely good information. This is a tidbit from the article. I found it helpful.

Drug dependence means that a person needs a drug to function normally. Abruptly stopping the drug leads to withdrawal symptoms. Drug addiction is the compulsive use of a substance, despite its negative or dangerous effects.

A person may have a physical dependence on a substance without having an addiction. For example, certain blood pressure medications do not cause addiction but they can cause physical dependence. Other drugs, such as cocaine, cause addiction without leading to physical dependence.

Tolerance to a drug (needing a higher dose to attain the same effect) is usually part of addiction.


www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001522.htm
Moderator on the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain forums
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Fibromyalgia, IDDM. UC, , Osteoarthritis and others slowly meandering their way through.
~~~~~
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Sue123
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 12/17/2011 1:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Hawk,
I personally wouldn't come clean with your doc, most docs get irritated when their patients don't follow their recommendations, especially with narcotics. You also run the risk of him cutting you off. I quit some medications and my doctor got nasty with me. I'm sticking to narcotics and had quit the anti-convulsants, anti-depressants. I've noticed it has made no difference on my level of pain being without the often off-label medications for nerve pain. Anyways, it's been my experience that doctors can get nasty, and they also don't want to lose their license by having a patient who they perceive abuses medication.

I noticed he's prescribed oxy-IRs, assuming this is the Instant release of Oxy's, then they would only last six hours; and, your doc is missing the point in prescribing long lasting medication for your condition which is obviously chronic. What you need to discuss is getting on long-acting, slow release narcotics. The type of oxy's which I think would be better for you are called Oxycontin - Oxycodone HCL CR (Cr for continuous release). They are typically prescribed twice a day, lasting 12 hours per dose. Some people have a faster metabolism, my doctor has prescribed every 6 hours. The medication will be more effective in your body than spiking with the quick fixes. I think you may also have luck with a lower dose as since it's slow release, you won't have withdrawl effects. Withdrawing can result in the need of even more narcotics as you're battling not only the pain, but also the withdrawl effects. Anyways, I find it's important to be very careful about the message one gives to pain management specialists. There's a doctor, Dr. Tennant, who writes great articles on how to communicate with pain specialists and what kinds of medicines, supplements are out there to help dampen the pain. Here's his site...http://foresttennant.com/pain_management_patient_self_help.html

Also, when you take the oxycontin, make sure you take it with a protein like with dinner, as it will metabolize better in your system. Some medicines are flushed through, which could be happening if you take it on an empty stomach or without enough of a meal to break it down. Sometimes I find it helps to stage it, I take 20mg with dinner, then an additional 20mg with a protein snack an hour later, etc until I get relief.

Well, if I were in your shoes, instead of asking for more, as for longer lasting (the continuous release) saying you do get pain relief but it seems like a roller coaster as your pain spikes sometimes during the day (and night if you sleep more than 6 hours). With a script of 180mg, oxycontin comes in 60mg and 80mg, so he'll give you a few of those. You could also ask for a small amount of breakthrough pain killers (ie your IRs) for when you stress your back, like if you have to drive a long distance to visit someone once a week. Most pain specialists prescribe one long acting and one short acting. Focus on describing your pain instead of asking for more. He may even have other suggestions like heat or a better mattress.

Good luck with your conversation and getting your pain under control!


p.s. I don't think you're an addict, just desperate for consistent pain relief. We've all been there at one point in our journey

Post Edited (Sue123) : 1/13/2012 3:29:24 PM (GMT-7)


sos007
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 615
   Posted 12/17/2011 1:55 AM (GMT -6)   
Hawk....I think Maggie and Laura have made alot of good advice. I think you need to get your pain under control and I think you need long lasting as well as break thru meds. I hope you start to feel better soon and that you can get your pain under control.

Bless you, Amy
Chronic Pain(nerve), fibro, mild depression and a few others

Sue123
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 12/17/2011 2:17 AM (GMT -6)   
For those interested in "addiction" comments

In the true definition, we're all addicts! For the cultural definition, only if we originally intended to get high... i.e. substance abuse. Taking extra meds when seeking pain relief for a medically diagnosed condition is not addiction in my mind., for those who doubt, walking a day in the shoes of someone with excruciating pain, would likely change their mind.

Maggie, you need to soften your message as to scoff at someone can make a person feel down when they're trying to ask for help. What does it add to the conversation to call someone an addict? It must have taken a lot of courage for Hawk just to join the forum and do his first post, and for Sam to share his withdrawl experience. It's a tough enough road without the mocking.

Here's the definition...
"Historically, addiction has been defined as physical and psychological dependence on psychoactive substances (for example alcohol, tobacco, heroin, caffeine and other drugs) which cross the blood-brain barrier once ingested, temporarily altering the chemical milieu of the brain"
Neuropathic pain since 2000, born 1960, Fentanyl, Oxycontin
Therapies: Epsom salt baths, sauna, therapeutic yoga, visualization, NLP, massage and chiropractic
Supplements: Source Naturals Multi-Vitamin, Minami Omega Fish Oil, Co-enzyme Q10 Ubiquinol, DLPA, N-Acetyl Tyrosine, Magnesium Glycinate, 3000 IU Vitamin D, Megafolonic, B12 Methylcobalamin, Magnesium Ascorbate (Vitamin C)

CRPSpatient
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 1276
   Posted 12/17/2011 4:42 AM (GMT -6)   
Laura, I'd tend to agree with you here.

I actually had this conversation with my GP the other day - he had to fit me in as an emergency because I flared my back to the point that I couldn't move, and he gave me an injection of tramadol (as the only way I tolerate morphine is with max doses of IV zofran). He told me to go home, take an extra anti-inflammatory, rest and hope that would settle things - BUT he also wrote me a cover letter in case things got bad later and I needed to go to the ER after hours.

I was concerned about being seen as a drug seeker if this had proven necessary - probably not a huge worry because I have pretty obvious CRPS signs and could have taken my x-rays and scans of my back with me - but he wrote a cover letter just in case that reads "She is opiate dependent but has no history of addictive behaviour or opiate misuse".

I've always made the definition in much the same way - that anyone on opiates long term develops a physical dependence because of the way the body adapts to having the drug there, but if you're not chasing euphoria in addition to pain relief or taking more than the prescribed amount then it's not 'addiction' as such.

Laura
Moderator - Chronic Pain Forum

Full body CRPS with spasms, dystonia & contractures, gastroparesis, orthostatic hypotension,bradycardia/tachycardia, bursitis, CTS, osteoporosis, multiple compression fx, disc bulges.

Oxycodone ER/IR, Topamax, Mobic, Somac, Cipramil, Midodrine, Vit D & C, SCS, baclofen/bupivacaine pump

bayoub2
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2861
   Posted 12/17/2011 5:57 AM (GMT -6)   
I absolutely agree I spoke harshly and I hope you will forgive... I must have been battling my own addiction that day and particularly rude. No, we are NOT addicts, in the generally accepted definition. I AM an addict, a recoveringone, but an addict nonetheless, so I was projecting on to you.

I'm sorry you are struggling with this...it is the hardest battle I've fought (harder than almost dying in Katrina) so you have my support, not condemnation.

I think you mentioned taking 4 for pain and 2 for euphoria...can you posssibly hold on to those 2 for later, at least keep creepy-crawlies away? I'm not sure doc will be very understanding, my docs would see it as addict behavior and a lack of control and drop me.

Like was mentioned before maybe some extended release would help control your dosing. Again, I apologize for being a blunt jerk, I don't know you and cannot truly understand your pain...we all do what we have to do...I hope you can find the strength to overcome this..I am doing better, but still struggle with running short

Hope all is forgiven
Maggie
"We never realize how strong we are, until being strong is the only thing left"
Major Depressive Disorder, ptsd, fibromyalgia, chronic pain, l3/4, L4/5 gone, bursitis arthritis sciatica

cymbalta seroquel hydrocodone klonopin magnesium potassium

BuccPride
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 27
   Posted 12/17/2011 6:33 AM (GMT -6)   
Maggie,

My reply to your first comment was put in the most courteous way I could muster, and I was content leaving it at that. Then I read that Amy thought you gave very good advice with that post. I was in the process of laying into you, but before finishing I reloaded the page. Your comment popped up in a much better mood than what you had previously. I probably should not have posted what I did when I ran out on time but could not get them. I just felt particularly attacked by you for merely trying to present an option that didn't involve "borrowing."
Femoral hip stem replacement. Rheumatoid arthritis in jaw. Depression. Failed mastoidectomy, hearing loss, tinnitus, and recurring ear infections. Major Herniated disc in T15-L1, L3-L4, and L5-S1.

bayoub2
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2861
   Posted 12/17/2011 8:35 AM (GMT -6)   
I am so sorry bucc and neurodreamz, I am normally a very positive and supportive person...I guess I'm mad at society that says if we buy off the street (for legitimate pain) we are addicts but a prescription makes us dependent...i certainly did not mean to denigrate anyone that deals with not only chroni pain but the meds we MUST have to survive

Please accept my heartfelt apology
Maggie
"We never realize how strong we are, until being strong is the only thing left"
Major Depressive Disorder, ptsd, fibromyalgia, chronic pain, l3/4, L4/5 gone, bursitis arthritis sciatica

cymbalta seroquel hydrocodone klonopin magnesium potassium

Sue123
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 52
   Posted 12/18/2011 12:56 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks, Maggie, for your apology ... it meant a lot. I have past experiences, too, that sometimes cloud my judgment. In the future, you can always edit your post with the pencil in the upper right corner. Take care

Post Edited (Sue123) : 1/13/2012 3:28:44 PM (GMT-7)


Lasardo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 373
   Posted 12/18/2011 3:12 AM (GMT -6)   
Hawk,
I responded to this because I relate and am also on Medicare. Are you u sure you are addicted? You say you take them as prescribed and do not snort or shoot. Are you takin them as prescribed? If you are..you are not addicted. You have pain and need them. More information would be helpful.
Leslie
Crohns dx,Pelvic Floor Tension,Pelvic Adhesive dx,interstitial cystitis,ileostomy,chronic pain,arthritis,fibromyalgia,severe 42 degree scoliosis,degenerative disc dx,neurological impingement,pelvic tilt and complete loss of neck curve. 4th degree tear during childbirth with 13 reconstructive surgeries (including fistulas) resulting in chronic pelvic pain and an ileostomy. Bp and panic attacks.

NiNi53
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 816
   Posted 12/18/2011 7:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Hello, I hate to sound like a broken record, but I agree with Stray and most of the others that answered you, please dont put yourself in a position of telling your dr. concerning your feelings that you are an addict, it will stay with you always, and this is not a good thing to do.
 
You have some real health problems, when we start on this journey, at some point we all go thru the "am I an addict", the facts are, if you take narcotic meds over a period of time you will be physically dependent on them, this does not mean you are an addict.  This means to manage your pain as best you can these are the meds that we need to take to have the best quality of life we can.  Thats it, plain and simple.  Its not always easy, I went through the whole, I am addicted to these meds thing, went through a nightmare of withdrawal, then I finally realized, I am not an addict, I need these to help me have the best life I possibly can given the circumstances.
 
Take care and good luck,
 
Kathy
degenerative disc disease, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, neuropathy, lumbar laminectomy july 1998 no help, rechargeable neurostimulator unit low right back w/lead wires to left side and right leg unit not working just sitting there.i am 57 years young in may will turn 58. i have 2 grown daughters, 25 and 29. i have 2 grandchildren, 9 year old grandaughter and 5 yr. old grandson

Lasardo
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 373
   Posted 12/19/2011 12:37 AM (GMT -6)   
Hawk,
I do not believe you are addicted. You are just dependent on your oxycodone. It sounds like you are taking them as prescribed but maybe you could stretch them out a little, if not, it sounds like you need to change medications. I take the fentanyl patch and it helps tremendously. My pain doesn't peak and plummet. I. Like you, could not tolerate methadone. Also for the nerve pain I have found gabapentin to be quite helpful. Talk to your doctor. Tell him you are not getting any relief. The other great thing about the patches is it is hard to abuse them. Think about it.. Leslie
Crohns dx,Pelvic Floor Tension,Pelvic Adhesive dx,interstitial cystitis,ileostomy,chronic pain,arthritis,fibromyalgia,severe 42 degree scoliosis,degenerative disc dx,neurological impingement,pelvic tilt and complete loss of neck curve. 4th degree tear during childbirth with 13 reconstructive surgeries (including fistulas) resulting in chronic pelvic pain and an ileostomy. Bp and panic attacks.

grainofsalt
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 215
   Posted 12/21/2011 9:47 AM (GMT -6)   
I will second that tolerance and addiction are two DIFFERENT things. Tolerance is a normal process and EVERYONE will experience atleast some form of it in having their chronic pain threated, thus is the reason for drug holidays, having breakthrough and regular doses/medications, opioid rotation, and adjuvanting with muscle relaxants, nerve calmers like Lyrica, the development of dual narcotic/anti depressant medications like Tapentadol and Tramadol, TENS units for non medicinal adjuvant therapy, time release and 7 day patch forumlations, epidural injections and steriod packs. ect ect ect. Tolerance is an expected and managable effect of medication in which the patient will require more medication to treat the affliction without some kind of action plan worked out with the doctor. The good news is that there multiple ways and mechanisms to help manage tolerance. The obvious example is that using steriod pack or eipidural, we might be able to reduce our dosing for a bit, reserving some of the tolerance. The bad news is that it will still happen to some degree and its part of the price of getting the relief we need.
MRI revealed disc bulge and test injections revealed RA. Radio Freq procedures helped for months, but pain is up and im having the procedure done again. Currently on 75 mgs of Nucynta (tapentadol - A MOR + NRI) 2 to 3 time per day and Soma 350 as needed.

Post Edited (grainofsalt) : 12/21/2011 8:51:54 AM (GMT-7)


Hawk512
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2011
Total Posts : 7
   Posted 12/24/2011 2:56 PM (GMT -6)   
I am having trouble controlling myself. As long as I have pills I want to take them. It's all I can do to control myself. I really feel like I have passed the point of dependence and on to addiction. It's hard for me to tell this but I feel I need to tell someone. If it wasn't for the pain, I think I need to go to rehab. But I can't bear the pain without the medication. I'm in between a rock and a hard place. I feel that I don't have a place to turn. If I open up to my doctor he will cut me off and I don't think I could handle that. If I go into rehab I will still get cut off. Either way I know I couldn't handle the pain. Does anyone have any suggestions? I'm truly in pain but have went too far with my medication.

straydog
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Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16294
   Posted 12/24/2011 3:24 PM (GMT -6)   
Hawk, we have tried being honest with you about how to handle this, and knowing what I do now, professional help is the only thing that is going to get you over the hump. if you have no self control. Eventually, the way you are taking your medication now is going to stop working on your pain and then where will you be? You will build up a tolerance to taking 6 pills at one time, probably quicker than you think. I don't understand taking all of them at once and then suffering as you do when they wear off. That makes no sense to put yourself thru that misery. You have got to understand this is all going to come tumbling down around you and I am afraid at that point no dr will touch you let alone give you medication. Are you not aware of how difficult it has become to get pain medication even from PM drs these days?

I don't know what kind of a relationship you have with your dr but the road you are on now is sure going to come to a dead end on you and I am afraid you will end up with nothing. I don't know how long you have been doing this or if you have had tendancies in the past to abuse medication but some of this could have possibly been avoided when you saw yourself starting to have a problem. I am not judging you by no means or trying to be harsh, its just that you have dug yourself such a hole.

I still stick with letting the dr know the medication is not covering your pain and being honest. Obviously lying about it is just going to cause more problems. I hope you can get this resolved. Take care and keep us posted on how you are doing.
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