Severed Ulnar Nerve!!!

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straydog
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Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16804
   Posted 5/14/2018 1:06 PM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, you have every right to have such mixed feelings about the entire situation. As hard as it is right now, try keep some positive thoughts going. The difference of opinions with the drs is really concerning but who knows what your outcome will be, lets hope & pray for the best. Drs are not God so keep that in mind.

Come here & write whatever is on your mind. If you feel the urge to vent go for it, we understand.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 5/15/2018 8:33 AM (GMT -6)   
I try to keep the positive things going but it's so hard as i feel so much worse due the fact mine just progressed so rapidly and i mean in weeks so each time i; was waiting for a test it got worse.That's the problem all the hand surgeons ive seen and Neurologists all say something different.One hand surgeon wants to do a hand transplant on me suggesting a better quality of life and sadly im considering it because my hand is so bad insuch short time.

Ive had the worst lines said to me by people who i thought were my friends, i even get yelled at parking in a disabled space but technically i am. All i can do is wait as apparently this AIN nerve transfer is suppose to be the you Beut ( meaning the best in Australian slang) but all ive read is horror stories and the net is filled with unpromising results so i don't know why hand surgeons speak highly of this surgery.

Would greatly appreciate any more feed back from others who have had it.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16804
   Posted 5/15/2018 8:58 AM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, just something to give you to think about while looking online for stories. More often than not, you will in online forums more failures than success stories. People that have done well are not posting in forums. They are getting on with their life. We have this very thing happen here at HW, people will post either right before or after surgery of any kind. Once they start healing & feeling better we will see less & less of them & they move on. I have been here a very long time & see this happen all the time here. This is why I get excited to see someone post positive things.

We have not had a current member in a while that has had this surgery. This is why you are not getting a lot of responses. Yes, people around us can be so insensitive & down right rude. Try to ignore them when things happen. I have become pretty thick skinned over the years.

Take care.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 5/15/2018 10:48 PM (GMT -6)   
Yes you are right nobody eve posts about anything positive as its it is never done and that is why all the negative stories are on the forums. Yes i'd imagine that you haven't seen many stories that are good.It would be so helpful to hear the good stories as that way you have hope as Doctors words cant be trusted when they say there are good ones.
Would be good if anyone had this surgery recently would post so they can share there experience. Oh i do that doesn't bother me i just think of recovering that is my primary thought.

Thank you for responding as i feel so alone in this.

RochesterEast
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2018
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 6/22/2018 12:08 AM (GMT -6)   
Yeah my ulnar nerve has burned for three years wanna cut my arm off on surgery number 4. Wish I could afford this guy... https://www.rmiclinic.com/about/dr-neil-riordan/ speaking of stem cells.

Kiev
New Member


Date Joined Aug 2018
Total Posts : 1
   Posted 8/23/2018 1:24 AM (GMT -6)   
Anyone have a similar story? Utility knife accident, stab type laceration to left wrist or lower forearm area. Blood squirted out, took months to regain any motor skills in the ring and pinky finger and years to regain any strength. Had no feeling in the Ulnar region of the hand and could feel the dead nerve ends in the palm where they retracted. Had a lump in my forearm that was very obvious to the naked eye, Loss of forearm strength and now cant even open a jar with my left hand without extreme pain in the wrist.

Lacerated Ulnar Nerve, Cut Ulnar Artery, Lacerated Palmaris Longis tendon, loss of palmaris longis muscle, Partially lacerated F.C.U. tendon. Ligated by Micro Vascular Hand Surgeon.

Ulnar Nerve Pain pulsating into my ring finger, Ulnar Nerve compression from scar where the nerve was cut, Ulnar nerve neuropothy, Ulnar nerve causing weakened grip strength, Ulnar nerve damage causing muscle wasting/Atrophy, Wrist pain constantly, When the fingers are extended out the pain is 3x worse, when pushing or pointing a button pain at wrist, Burning nerve pain running up into the arm pit and then neck, Ganglion cyst at wrist, burning tricep muscle pain, lower part of the shoulder blade pain, Feeling unbalanced, Insomnia, Feeling of fight or flight, non stop high pitched ringing in my ears,
I accidentally made the biggest mistake of my life about four years ago now. Tingling sensation on the bottom outer edges of my shoulder blade and a chilly hand when I wake up in the morning.
Muy arm feels like it will never get better, and now when I hold my hand above my chest, it gets to be very difficult to hold it up, and feels like the arm is getting weaker by the day.
Does anyone have some helpful advise on how much pain is enough when I feel like I have been tortured for the past four years? Pain level 10, Thanks for any and all help.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16804
   Posted 8/24/2018 10:30 AM (GMT -6)   
Hello Kiev & welcome to Healing Well. After reading your story there is no question how severe the injury was. However, worst of all the issues that you continue to have. While I have no real experience with your type of injury, I do understand nerve pain. What is have seen over the years here any injury to the arms requiring surgery the residual issue after surgery can be unbearable for some. I know any time there is nerve involvement it's just not good.

Are you continuing to receive treatment, if so, what type of dr is treating you? As much as you have going on with all of these symptoms what are they telling you? Have you been tried on any of the medications that is used to treat nerve pain? What about the shoulder & neck pain that is involved, anyone ever look at these areas? Sorry for so many questions.

I hope you will come back & fill in some blanks, perhaps we can offer up some ideas.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 8/24/2018 4:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Kiev:
An injury such as yours can result in agonizing nerve pain. I am sorry for all that you have endured and continue to endure.

A nerve block of the brachial plexus (the primary nerve bundle that innervates the arm) would be worth discussing with an board certified anesthesiologist or interventional radiologist. A pain management physician would not ordinarily perform a sympahetic nerve block unless he/she was a board certified anesthesiologist as his/her medical speciality. A sympathetic nerve block can provide relief for 4-5 months and can be repeated if successful. A local anesthetic agent is used (narcaine, as an example) and
Can be combined with a CNS muscle relaxant (baclofen, as an example).

A light compressive full arm garment would also be worth trying. 10-15 mg hg pressure. Light compression provides a constant incoming sensory stimuli that helps to override pain impulses, similar to swaddling a fussy baby.

I suffered from reflex sympathetic dystrophy in my right leg after surgery for a torn ACL ligament that went astray. The pain was off-the-charts in intensity. High pitched, burning, all consuming. Life was a blur. I think back on the RSD and it makes my current necrotic bone pain tame in comparison.

A sympathetic nerve block of the shoulder/scapular brachial plexus would be where I would trend if I were in your pain-filled situation.

I hope that you can find a measure of sustained pain relief.
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Post Edited ((Seashell)) : 8/24/2018 3:44:57 PM (GMT-6)


Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/17/2018 7:57 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi again to anybody else who comes across this forum.
21 weeks ago I I had a decompression of the right elbow as I had an ulnar nerve entrapment and a anterior interosseous nerve transfer done ( end to side)
Now I live in Australia so this is done by Hand Surgeon's /plastic Surgeon's / Neurosurgeons so immediately you don't know who to go to first.
My Surgeon who performed my operation is suppose to be one of the best In Australia as he spent many years in some unit in Kentucky that specialises in Hand Surgery of all sorts.

I am 21 weeks post Op and there has not been one bit of change to motor function that I have noticed. I even doubted that the AIN nerve Anastomosis came loose but my hand surgeon didn't think so. So I had my Neurologist order an MRI and Ultrasound of the right forearm and sadly the AIN nerve can't be seen and also my report says NO EVIDENCE OF ANASTOMOSIS FAILURE but this is like the saying of the tree falling in the wood's just because you can't hear it doesn't mean it didn't happen.

As another member here pointed out to discuss this with my surgeon as to what exactly does this AIN nerve transfer suppose to do? so I have done exactly that and the response was " it isn't suppose to do anything except keep the motor end plates alive until the native axons regenerate"

I have read people who have had this surgey have started to get results in 3 month's 6 and 10 month's so I can't believe my surgeon and we all know that Drs aren't right.

The other thing that I'd like to point out is I've been told to see occupational Therapy. In Australia occupational therapy doesn't deal with the hand is a sub speciality of physiotherapy known as hand therapy and I have been dismissed by two already as I can't do those specific excersises as the ulnar nerve innervates them. So I'm here left to wait and I'm trying to be optimistic and trying to be hopeful but it's so hard as my life is going past me and l use to be a physical person as I was heavily into body-building and my job was In Security so I can't do either of them nor do any other work as this moment I'm disabled and employers don't want disabled workers as it's a liability.
Anyone reading this will think of should see a Pyschiatrist but what is the point telling a Pyschiatrist 300$ to say my hand doesn't work that is useless.

If only I had some changes I would start to feel hopefull.

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16804
   Posted 9/18/2018 8:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, I really wish I could offer you some sort of guidance that could help you out. What I will tell you is this, do not discount your emotional well being in this. It is more common than you think for people to become depressed when they have something like this change their life in a short time. I have lived two different lives. It is very hard to let go of the old life. There is nothing wrong with getting professional help. My gp put me on medication with the agreement I would see a psychologist. That was one of the best things that ever happened to me.

Something to think about.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 9/18/2018 11:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Sarge.

It sucks when we don't get the best result. You can see from my signature, I've had a lot of work done on me.

After 2 surgeries on the right shoulder, my body reabsorbed what was left of the end of my collar bone. I am permanently disfigured and the tendons are literally hanging on by a thread.

I have permanent nerve damage and have mostly adjusted to the chronic pain from the ulnar nerve. I do have function, though, and feel terrible for you that yours has not returned.

I don't consider myself a particularly vain person...but...all of these scars get to me sometimes. The looks I get if my shoulders are bare...I can't even wear a regular bra, as the strap falls off no matter what I do!

I worked most of my days in 'assembly and production' or 'cashier'...both jobs relied heavily on my use of my hands and arms. Nine surgeries on my upper extremeties with limitations did not make me a sought after employee.

I felt betrayed by my body. I felt useless and unproductive. I fought addiction issues that loomed from the constant use of medications. I had to fight through 2 denials for SSD, nearly lost my home, considered dark options.

Getting into therapy was life saving for me. Over a year of twice weekly visits, I was slowly able to get my brain around being 'retired' as opposed to 'disabled'. It wasn't about 'just' not working. The loss of schedule, the loss of human contact, the loss of 'job well done', the loss of earning potential...I had to go ahead and grieve...and find new avenues for these things (well, most of them).

I was declared disabled from work as of my last day worked, 2006. My 'meltdown' came 2 years later. You may not need it now...but please don't hesitate if the time comes.
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/18/2018 9:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Pitmom

Thank you so much for your insight you at least know where I'm coming from. Yes I've seen your signature you have had quite a alot done and it is by no means not alot it's heaps.

That's what I wanted to ask you about some sort of nerve stimulation you said some therapist had done what was the name of it for your ulnar nerve?

Speaking of the ulnar nerve everyone seems to have some sort of pain as I don't absolutely no pain now I don't know if it's a good thing or not? as in my head I think my nerve has Just died.

Even in the beginning of had not one symptom until February this year and it went down hill quick as I'm sure you probably have read what I've posted before.

Your Job being involved with physical work like myself this is what gets hard as being disabled nobody really wants you based on your ability what you can do.

Speaking of clothes some of my clothes now are to big on me and I can't wear them, I wear a special glove all the time on my hand so it doesn't look bad and it helps a little bit with grip but not much.

I've been finding that part too particular difficult as I'm thinking what do I do when my savings all runs out I'm in trouble then also thinking my job has given me one year to recooperate and I find that hard to believe as in just over 5 month's nothing I doubt there will be anything in the next 12 if I last that long as I feel like leaving this earth every day.

I can't have any fun meet anyone as having this disability is turn off to most people and theoretically I shouldn't drive but I still do.

I too am taking medication to sleep and a tone of supplements that I have read that are good on nerve regeneration but nothing seems to work.

My general Dr doesn't know what to do with me so each day I live waiting for something to be different in my hand not to mention all the mixed opinions I have from 3 Neurologists my hand surgeon and a Neurosurgen so I don't know which one to listen to.

I respect that you have gone through alot and still manage to cope I don't think I'm strong enough for that.
Being 35 and dealing with this isn't easy and all I think about is did I deserve this did I do bad to someone to be punished as I have always been good to people it can't be for that.

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 9/18/2018 9:56 PM (GMT -6)   
Sarge 83:
In holding onto hope that you experience recovery of your ulnar nerve, it would also be wise to
begin to work with a trusted other (psychologist, social worker, vocational counselor, pastor) on creating a back-up plan and mapping out possibilities for life if recovery does not occur or occurs to only a partial degree.

Behind very person’s face is a personal story. Most people experience unforeseen life challenges. You never know how strong you are until you are faced with a life-altering health challenge. Finding ways to cope, adapt, and adjust will help you reclaim a life with meaning and purpose.

As a physical therapist, I worked with individuals with devestating head and spinal cord injuries. Spinal cord injury with quadriplegia, paralysis from the neck down. Closed head injury rendering a person with the executive reasoning of a 5 year old. The stricken were usually young men in their early 20’s who felt invincible riding motorcycles or diving from high rock ledges into a shallow river. These individuals had to relearn how to roll over, how to sit, how to eat, how to dress, and how to toilet - from the smallest and most simple of daily tasks.

From working with this population, I came to appreciate ALL that my body is doing and doing well, despite my health challenges.

Instead of focusing on the failings of your ulnar nerve and arm, can you begin to take inventory of skills, aptitudes, and I inate talents that you have that can help you overcome this immediate challenge which is your ulnar nerve/arm?

Is there an area of interest that would compel you to return to school/college/training to learn a new skill or vocation?

Is there an area of personal interest that you have always wanted to explore but did not owing to other commitments that may now be open to you? Ex. A passion for technology that might now gel into becoming a software code writer. Ex. A love for animals that might gel into becoming a dog walker.

I know that I have had to re-examine my life and where I thought life was taking me due to health challenges that were not under my control. I think back to the patients that I worked with as a physical therapist . . . And I refocus on what I am able to do as opposed to what I can no longer do.

Begin to write or make notation of what you can do. Put it it writing so that you can see your capabilities and talents in a new light.

Be watchful for unexpected opportunities that might present to you. New doors that open.

There is a meaningful life that awaits you. It may take time for it to materialize and it may be different than the life that you had pictured for yourself, but there is a quality life to be found. Keep faith and hope.
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Post Edited ((Seashell)) : 9/18/2018 9:14:47 PM (GMT-6)


Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/19/2018 4:00 AM (GMT -6)   
Seashell

That's all im currently doing is holding on hope doubting my surgeon did this correctly or something went very wrong after i don't know as i say all i hear is to early so when is to late is the big question.
Talking to a psychologist would be not be helpful they will say just wait for the time being.

I respect that you have seen people having to rehabilitate and cope or adapt new ways is something not every person can see and having to adapt personally as i have im finding it very hard as im being discriminated already and this is just the beginning of this struggle as eventually ill have to come to terms if i come to terms into whatever recovery i get. There is a member here known as VD who i have come into contact with out of chance on another website, she tells me how her life is ruined due to her ulnar nerve failure which is on this thread and the poor girl is only 24 and she is not coping two years after this has happened so my actions of not coping just after a few months is very much similar.

i can't compare this disability to somebody else's as a disability is a disability and will effect each person accordingly. As i have said coming form my background this is severely impacted me had i'd been someone who was not physically dependent it would not be as bad.

I see people all over Instagram putting pictures up and cheering about ulnar nerve surgery but these people mainly had mild symptoms that's why they are all smiling but the people with the horror stories are here and very rarely somewhere else so there isn't really anywhere we can share stories recoveries.

i have been personally turned away from a disability group in Sydney as currently i am awaiting recovery and i can't be classed as disabled as this is still early according to this group yet to me it feels like an ETERNITY!

I have looked at basic jobs as you mention walker of dogs, i have looked at Traffic Control Uber driving and office work and all are requiring two hands and that i am Liability to employ so im here thinking i don't even know where as yet to begin but VD the member has had the same problem she has been turned away like i have and this is what is dilating watching and seeing your life waste away.

so they are helpful hints but reality is it isn't that easy and i wish i could be part of something but at this stage i can't so i have to sit on the side line and just wait,as my general Dr says " its ok you don't need two hands to live" sure you can say that but im sure if he had to give up a function or lost it he wouldn't be highlighting that phrase so easily.

So once again i respect all members on this forum and appreciate all input that they have given to me, all i can say is thank you and that ill keep everyone posted each step of the way.

pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 9/19/2018 3:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, I don't know where you live but here we have the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. They tested me for any other aptitude and possible schooling to change my line of work. Proofreading was one that I matched with...no hands required except for turning the page! You could even get a holder for the manuscripts! With so much being online now I guess it would be even simpler!

Seashell makes an excellent point of looking at the rest of our lives for possible income generating work.

To answer your question about the modality used by my physical therapist...he called it 'points'. Seashell may know the proper name for it. A stylus was placed incrementally along the new pathway and a zap was sent through the stylus to aide innervation. It was sort of like an E.M.G. type of zap. Hope this helps you in your quest for improvement.

Are you doing stretches of the fingers? Warm soaks in Epsom salts? My Dad had Dupytrens contractures (sp?) and his fingers were contracting (he was a draftsman by trade and a drummer and sleight of hand magician by hobby). He did not keep up with the excersizes after surgery and this destroyed him. I watched him commit 'slow motion suicide' by drinking and smoking himself to death.

I refuse to give in to the depression over my present state. While I may not be able to work, due to my physical issues, I AM STILL USEFUL! Just being here, and in other forums, sharing my experiences is a 'job' in and of itself.

One of the factory jobs I worked, the supervisor had only one hand. I've no idea what happened or if he had been born that way...but he was working in spite of his 'lack'. People have lost limbs and still continue in the work force...just in modified jobs or entirely new careers.

I saw the counselor as I was going through the process of 2 denials for SSD. The here and now IS the time to be dealt with! I encourage you to find someone professional to have at least a consultation with.
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/19/2018 10:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Pitmom

I live in Sydney Australia so I'm not familiar of any Vocational rehabilitation it is probably called something else.

If SeaShell could tell me what that modulation therapy was that would be great. There is TENS electrical Stimulation the there is MENS microcurrent stimulation, p Point Stimulation mainly acupuncturists use those.
Other wise im not sure of what else Australia has.
Other then that I do electro acupuncture And cold lazer therapy like 4times a week

I Stretch my fingers out regularly and wear a splint at night.
That's what hurt him was no being able to do what he did which is what is killing me.
If I were to go down that path I would make sure it's quick and painless maybe an overdose on Xannex and Opioids would be my choice.

Yes that's correct you are very much involved in this forum so that is a Job itself.

I'm not sure about what work I can do for now and I don't even know of Disability work im sure there is something but I don't know what to do based on my ability.

I don't know how some of the people adapt as I'm not adapting now just being in my present state.

Post Edited (Sarge 83) : 9/19/2018 9:31:32 PM (GMT-6)


pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 9/20/2018 7:43 AM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, I strongly encourage you to post in the Depression forum.

One of the other 'regulars' there is also in Australia. I've asked him to talk with you as he may know of resources available there.
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/20/2018 8:33 AM (GMT -6)   
I'll post in the Forum what is his display name?

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 9/20/2018 1:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Sarge:
As to a clinical modality to provide an exogenous/external electrical impulse to maintain viability of your injuried ulnar nerve, there is no one single or specific modality that is superior to another.

What is essential is that the external impulse be of sufficient voltage/Hz (about 20-30 Hz) to elicit an actual muscle contraction of the downstream muscles. That is, you want to eleicit and see a visible muscle contraction (sustained tightening of the muscle and/or joint movement of the wrist/fingers). You can use a stylus point or standard electrodes to provide the stimulus. Personally, I preferred the stylus point for neuromuscular re-education as it allows for the stimulus to be applied along the length of the injuried nerve.

Your writings are palpable for the emotional distress that you are experiencing.

I also have had personal health hurdles that were life-affecting. Adapting and adjusting was a gradual process over time. An ebb and flow.

The perforation of my intestine was severe, akin to the unzipping of the zipper of a rain jacket. My abdominal/pelvic cavities became septic. My diaphragm was also intruded with leakage of fecal material into my pleural cavity. I was given a 5 % chance of survival and experienced a transformative near death experience. To wit: I did not want to return to earth from wherever it was that I was when I was imbetween Heaven and earth. I firmly believe that I was in the presence of God/Higher Power. It was immensely comforting and enveloping. I had no pain, as I had no body form. I wanted to stay. God/Higher Power had other plans for me . . . And, so, here I am.

As I gained conscious awareness in ICU, I had to come to terms with the ostomy pouch sharing space on my abdomen and an open/gaping 14” surgical incision (no sutures, no staples) that was purposely left open to heal by secondary intention. I knew that life would never be the same.

Mention the word “ileostomy” “colostomy” or “stoma” or “ostomy bag” and most people instinctively recoil with a sense of disgust. An ostomy comes associated as a dirty bag of poop dangling from one’s abdomen, something reserved to those who are decayed and elderly, a dark secret and something to be ashamed of. I had to become my own source of solace and compassion in learning to live with an ostomy.

Body image difficulties accompany many people with a new ostomy.

Let alone the pervasive presence of food and eating. Much of our social culture revolves around occasions hat include food and eating. My broad intestinal resection and resultant small intestine syndrome have limited my food options. Going out to a restaurant is no longer a source of camaraderie and relaxation for me, owing to digestive difficulties. My world has constricted, smaller and smaller.

All to say . . . I do empathize with your feelings of isolation and despondency. Life is not always fair.

Owing a companion pet has been my lifeline in reclaiming a resemblance of a life. Have you considered adopting a dog or cat? Adopting a rescue dog or cat from a shelter can be a source of immense love and connection. The question then becomes, who rescues who? Are you rescuing the pet to a better life? or is the rescues pet rescuing you from the depths of chronic loss of health and loneliness?

I have written on this forum about my 16 year old tea-cup Maltese, Molly, and of the special bond between us. This little dog was the one constant that I could depend on. Mutual trust and respect. I have a new little heartbeat, Abby, who means the world to me.

The human-canine bond and human-feline bond is like no other.

A companion pet offers unconditional love. What you look like is indifferent to them. When I look into Anby’s eyes, she reflects total acceptance of me. Her spirit keeps me going.

Consider adopting a companion pet. A companion pet can offer much that human relationships lack. I am a better person for having a pet in my life. I consider Abby to be a genuine gift.

Sarge, I genuinely hope for you healing of body and an easing of the flood of emotions that you feel. I hope that you get to where you need to be.
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Post Edited ((Seashell)) : 9/20/2018 12:20:24 PM (GMT-6)


pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 9/20/2018 2:50 PM (GMT -6)   
he goes by 'thehtreturns'
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/20/2018 9:20 PM (GMT -6)   
SeaShell

Thank you for explaining to me the device that is required, it is similar to Scenar therapy which l do twice a week.
Sadly there is no muscle contraction in the hand on the ulnar aspect because those muscles have wasted and become soft only sensory I feel.

I can totally understand that you have felt at peace in your near death experience. I am familiar with the stomal bags as my had one sadly due to bowel cancer and because he had dementia he use to remove the bag and rub the faecal matter all over himself. My poor grandmother suffered years changing him and he eventually passed away from a respiratory failure.

I can imagine how people sense this thought with ostomy bags and being able to manage with that is something that would take alot do.

No life isn't fair and each person struggling with something is the biggest challenge as I don't know at this stage what my recovery realistically will be as my Surgeon is thinking of opening my forearm up to see the anastomosis as it wasn't able to found on a MRI.
He wants to be certain first before he does this so I once again am on hold.

I do own a cat and always have but I can't seem to find that love the same in animals as much as I love cats and dogs I miss human company and being isolated is most bothering.

I too when I show my hand I get remarks like "go get that checked out mate" well that's exactly what I'm doing and to be honest I'm so sick of telling everyone "what happy to your hand!" especially if that person is a fool and wouldn't understand the concept of the whole scenario.

I appreciate your input to this I can see that many people have something they lost and have to adapt to and I'm in that process.

The coming to terms part was the worst part for me as initially I couldn't even use my bad hand so all basic things were impossible. Friend who I thought were friends made foul jokes about my disability and there my haters came out as it was good to kick me when I'm down.

I'll contact this member Pitmom has mentioned to see what disabled services are available here in Sydney Australia.

Thank you for your help

pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 9/21/2018 8:46 AM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, I can relate somewhat to having a non functioning hand, but only to the point of post op experiences. That old saying "You don't know what you've got till it's gone." is sooo true! I've had 3 surgeries on my dominant hand and one on the non-dominant. Such a challenge!

Getting dressed is only part of the picture. What a pain to have to never wear buttons or snaps, fasten a bra (for women), find and wear shoes without laces...forget about rolling up sleeves!

Learning to brush teeth with a non dominant hand or hair even...argh! I found using a long handled scrub type brush in the shower to be most helpful, but even then, some places are challenging to the point of being unable to do so...armpits for example...and elbows!

Preparing food...everything from peeling and cutting to removing heavy pans from the oven or two handle pots from the stovetop! Then, trying to clean up after!

I would not want to try shaving with my non dominant hand either!

There is an implement, commonly called a 'suicide knob' that attaches to the steering wheel of a car.

Then, there's always the spectre of something going wrong with the other hand! Ergonomically, the overuse or unusual positioning when in use leads to problems of it's own.

All of this takes it's toll. And that's just the physical part!

I've had people ask me "What happened to your shoulder?" To which I sometimes reply, "What happened to your brain?" Yeah, days like that will happen.

Feel free to e-mail me if you need to talk about things that aren't encouraged on the site.

Dana
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16804
   Posted 9/21/2018 1:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Sarge, I saw your post to HT in the heart forum. He may or may not see it. I suggest that you make a post directed to him in the depression forum. He tends to pop in there more than any of the forums. If you are not sure how to make a new separate let me know I can help you out.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

Sarge 83
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2018
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 9/21/2018 10:12 PM (GMT -6)   
Pitmom
I've never experienced that to this level of you never know what you got til it's gone, around a person or item it's a whole new level with a function in the body.

All of the above with wearing clothes except bra, these seem to be easy to anybody that's not effected to us big difference.

The brushing of the teeth and cutting food and washing all these things I can't do like I use to.
Shaving I do but it's once a week and I normally cut myself a few times in the process.

I think I've seen this nob on the steering wheel in a magazine before but I don't know where to get one.

That's what my hand surgeon said that I shouldn't overuse the left arm as I have a mild compression on the left elbow but it is nothing compared to my right what that was.
He wants to do my left but won't until I have some sufficient recovery of the right

I think I need to start using this line to some people I come into contact with when they say that too me.

Thank you I have your email I checked on your profile I will message you when there are some things that are not on this site.

Straydog he hasn't posted in a few day's I'll keep an eye for when he posts and I'll be able to catch him.

pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 9/22/2018 7:51 AM (GMT -6)   
Sarge,

When I worked briefly as a bartender, there was an implement we used for washing the glasses...a brush on a suction cup that was placed in the bottom of the sink. If you have any stores that might carry bar supplies, it's worth looking for. Perhaps a local pub might be able to tell you where to get one. This may also be helpful for the dishes, too! I do not have a dishwasher machine!

This same implement may be useful in the shower if you attach it to the wall, for those 'hard to reach' places...armpit and 'working' arm. There is also a brush for feet that is suction cupped to the floor of the tub or shower.

I'm wracking my brain...trying to think of what I used that might be helpful to you. Non slip shelf liner can be a big help in keeping things from 'getting away' on a countertop. I also found a combination bottle opener with a nice ergonomic handle. It can open bottle cap beverages (soda, beer) as well as twist of caps of different sizes. My grip is extremely weak and this opener has been a big help...especially when I had no use of my hand.

I wonder if an electric shaver might be a good idea for you? Then, if finances allow, you could treat yourself to the barber shop once a month for a blade shave? I hated my hands and the scars and when I finally got on Disability, I would go and get my nails done. Psychologically, it gave me a boost.

Speaking of hands...have you tried parafin? Having your hand dipped into hot wax and then wrapped for a period of time? The deep heat it provides might help keep it 'looser' and be comforting.

There is a newfangled contraption available here in the US, not sure about where you are, but it helps put on and take off socks. Here, it's in the 'As Seen On T.V.' displays at the stores. Do you have those where you are?

Do you have a shoe horn to help you? They have long handled ones as well as the short ones.

On the subject of 'thehtreturns', I know he was having difficulty with his computer and a phone is too small for him to see the text well, but when he gets to the library he usually posts in the Depression 'Daily Check In' thread. It's been a few days since I've seen anything from him, but I did leave a message there for him to look for you. As Straydog suggested, perhaps if you start your own thread, he would be able to find you easier, as this thread was started by someone else.

Hoping you're having a good day today...........Dana
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus
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