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Abouzlife
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2015
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 8/7/2018 10:06 AM (GMT -6)   
I will be having my nerve tumor removal on my shin in 2 weeks they suspect is a MPNST(as i have NF1). Would be a 2 hour surgery. And I will be on bed rest for 2 days. I won't be given a catheter but will be given a bed urinal but I have bladder shyness. As I am in a open ward (around 6 in a room).told them I don't mind inserting it under cause of my shy bladder but they don't want. Told me to relax and i can be able to pee

Any tips for using a urinal in bed for bladder shy person?

The only thing I worried about is I can't urine and they need to insert it when I am awake

Also I am always prone to constipation told them that also told me I will be giving enema most likely is I am constipated cause of my constipation history

Anyway not to get constipated ?

Thanks

pitmom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2015
Total Posts : 2407
   Posted 8/7/2018 5:20 PM (GMT -6)   
First, best wishes for your surgery...may it be successful with a strong speedy recovery.

As to the rest...try to remember that everyone else is in the same situation as you in that ward and they all know that 'everybody pees and poops'. Everybody sleeps as well, so maybe you can time your use of the urinal to when they are sleeping? Perhaps some of them will be off the ward at points during the day for tests or therapies?

My mother had 'shy bladder and bowel' and I remember how difficult it was for her, especially travelling. She probably would have loved to have had a cell phone that could play music to help 'cover' the sounds.

I had some constipation issues...even aneurized a hemerroid once...my proctologist told me to use one of the fiber products you mix in liquid...so my poop would be 'like an Irish sweater'...bulky yet soft. ha ha ha!

Pain medication can make people constipated, in part I think because we get sleepy and don't drink much while taking them, so try to make sure you are hydrated well.
multiple surgeries for rotator cuff both shoulders with residual chronic impingement syndrome, ulnar nerve transposition, carpal tunnel release, multiple wrist surgeries, multiple herniated discs, tarlov cysts, whiplash, bursitis of hips, grade 5 right shoulder separation and torn labrum, ovarian cysts, fibroid tumors of the uterus

Chutz
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 9289
   Posted 8/7/2018 6:50 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi,

I use MiraLax, or a generic, since I take pain medications that are constipating. I mix it in with my coffee and you can't tell it's there. Makes a huge difference. Good luck with your surgery!

Warmly,
Chutz
Fibromyalgia (chronic pain), IDDM (diabetes). Ulcerative Colitis, , Osteoarthritis, Degenerative Disk Disease, Depression, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, PTSD and others trying to mess up life.
~~~~~
The microwave oven is the consolation prize in our struggle to understand physics. ~Jason Love

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 8/8/2018 10:34 AM (GMT -6)   
I second the suggestion of Miralax. It is an osmotic laxative (meaning Miralax draws water into the large intestine) and is non-habit forming (meaning you can use Miralax over the long term without risk of laxative dependency). Miralax dissolves completely without any gritty
mouth feel.

Miralax is the brand name. The same is available as a generic at a reduced cost.

The benefit of Miralax if that you can adjust the dose to your needs. As the dose is increased, water transfer into the large intestine is increased, making the stool looser and easier to pass.

Magnesium as a supplement (magnesium citrate is available as both a capsule or powder you mix with a beverage) or the familiar mainstay Milk of Magnesia is also a good choice for bowel management. Like Miralax, a daily magnesium supplement (500 mg capsule 2-3 times a day or a product called “Natural Calm” by Vitality Holistics as a powder) or Milk of Magnesia (1-2 tablespoons a day) is an osmotic laxative without risk of laxative dependency.

Magnesium is a natural element, a non-chemical laxative. Magnesium provides a kinetic, muscular “oomph” to promote the large intestine to contract as nature intends in parasistalic waves. That is, magnesium gives your intestines the message to move food material along the digestive tract.

Stool softeners have low/minimal benefit for constipation. Stool softeners facilitate water migration into the intestine but provide no kinetic/movement effect. The result can often be that fecal matter becomes heavily weighted with water and sits, stagnant, in the lower digestive tract. Miralax or Milk of Magnesia are far better options.

And never forget the benefit of warmed prune juice. 100% natural with no chemical additives. 6-8 ounces a day of prune juice.

Opiate induced constipation is a real problem for many people on opiates. Your question about constipation and the posts in response will help other people on this forum.

Sending you best wishes for a successful resection of the lesion on your leg and gentle healing.
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Abouzlife
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2015
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 8/13/2018 8:28 AM (GMT -6)   
Any tips for using a urinal in bed?
I am 21 years old this year
I Currently Have:

    NF1 - Diagnosis when i was 12
    Proctalgia fugax - 26/06/2015

Have History of:

    Prostatitis
    Urinary retention
    Urinary Tract & Bladder Infection

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 8/13/2018 12:48 PM (GMT -6)   
Turning on the water faucet of the bathroom sink adjacent to your hospital bed may be a gentle stimulus to your bladder while on bed rest.

You might look into available apps or CDs of soothing sounds and music. Many offerings of ocean sounds, nature, and soothing music are able to access on an iPhone.

There is also the option of intermittent catheterization if your bladder is overly shy and not wanting to empty.

Try not to imagine the worst case scenario that you bladder goes to sleep. Visualize your bladder relaxing. The mind body connection is real. Our thoughts and internal dialogue influence our physical body and its workings.

Best wishes for a gentle recovery,
Karen

Abouzlife
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2015
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 8/14/2018 7:28 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks
if i have a private room i will be able to do it but i will be i a 6 bedded room(with 5 other patient). have trouble urine when people is around me. been catheterized awake once after i got my hydrocelectomy when i was 12 cause i cant urine (cause of bladder shy)

Anyway to convince my doc to catheter me under GA? as i DW to be Cath Awake i don't like the feeling
i have been talking to him but he want me to try the portable urinal first before cathing me if needed
I am 21 years old this year
I Currently Have:

    NF1 - Diagnosis when i was 12
    Proctalgia fugax - 26/06/2015

Have History of:

    Prostatitis
    Urinary retention
    Urinary Tract & Bladder Infection

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 8/14/2018 10:22 AM (GMT -6)   
An indwelling catheter (placed while under anesthesia or post operatively) carries the real potential for a urinate tract or bladder infection. The draining tube provides a ready incoming road for simple, every present bacteria to freely enter the urinary system (urethra and bladder and kidneys).

Intermittent carheterization does not have that same risk. The intermittent catherizatikn tubes are ultra thin and single use. People with spinal cord injuries self cath several times a day.

Even if you are in a room with other patients, and especially so, there will be ample background noises from those patients - talking, rustling with a newspaper, watching television, nurses and staff entering and leaving - to offset your sense of self-awareness.

Pee, poop . . . It is universal.

I have a permanent ileostomy. That is, I wear an ostomy pouch on my abdomen that collects fecal output. It has become second nature to me, akin to wearing a pair of bifocals to see better. No one who sees me would know that I wear an ostomy pouch. The pouch is odorless. Low profile. And I am a petite/small person where a bulge would be a curiousity to a casual observer.

What you need to remember is that people, for the most part, are self-absorbed in their own orbit. People will not be focusing their attention on sounds coming from your curtained cubicle. The use of a meditative CD or sounds of ocean waves or whatever would give you a sense of enhancing your privacy.

In the end, your forced convalescence will be a finate experience with an end date. Given the inherent risks of bedrest, your physician will have you up and at least sitting as soon as the particulars of your leg wound allow.

All to say . . . Try to ease your worries. Often what I worry about the most turns out to be less problematic than I envisioned.
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)

Post Edited ((Seashell)) : 8/14/2018 11:32:07 AM (GMT-6)


Abouzlife
New Member


Date Joined Jun 2015
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 8/29/2018 7:36 AM (GMT -6)   
Surgery went well. The tumor is non cancerous
end up getting a indwelling catheter inserted. Was embarrassed as i was crying when the catheter was inserted i hate the feeling. Catheter still in me they planning to removed it when i am going for my followup next week.

and yes i did get constipation tried laxative and heavy laxative and it did not worked end up getting a few enemas to get rid of the hard stools
I am 21 years old this year
I Currently Have:

    NF1 - Diagnosis when i was 12
    Proctalgia fugax - 26/06/2015

Have History of:

    Prostatitis
    Urinary retention
    Urinary Tract & Bladder Infection

straydog
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2003
Total Posts : 16804
   Posted 8/29/2018 7:59 AM (GMT -6)   
A, congrats on the no cancer diagnosis. Catheters can be annoying to painful for patients. I do hope that your recovery goes very well. If you were given pain medications, keep in mind they will cause constipation. Keep yourself very well hydrated as this will also help keeping things moving. Soon this surgery will be in your rear view mirror.

Take care.
Susie
Moderator in Chronic Pain & Psoriasis Forums

(Seashell)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2012
Total Posts : 893
   Posted 8/29/2018 12:29 PM (GMT -6)   
aboutzlife:
Phew . . . You have made it through the surgery and initial post-op days and the urinary and bladder issues that most concerned you.

It is OK to let your “sword” of bravery down and cry. Its OK to let emotions flow, regroup, rest, and continue on.

That is encouraging Good News that the pathology report is benign. Let that finding be a calming sauve.

Sending you healing karma for the days ahead,
Karen
Pituitary failure, wide-spread endocrine dysfunction
Addison's disease
Mixed connective tissue disorder
Extensive intestinal perforation with sepsis, permanent ileostomy
Avascular necrosis of both hips and jaw
Receiving Palliative Care (care and comfort)
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