Does Your Doctor Listen to You?

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Sherrine
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 17897
   Posted 7/21/2018 9:57 AM (GMT -6)   
I came across this article today but wasn’t a bit surprised. It is very important that you have a doctor who will listen to you and give you a chance to tell them what is bothering you. I’m blessed with good doctors but I did my homework before making my appointment.

I see my Internist every three to four months. He wants to see me then and it’s called a follow up appointment. I like Internists instead of family practitioners because they have more medical training, I believe. My doctor always comes in, greets me and then asks me If f I m having any problems. If I am, I can fully explain what it s going on and then he asks me questions that help him make a diagnosis. Then I ask questions. Before he leave, he always asks me if I have anymore questions. My appointments can last a half an hour, depending on if I am having issues. That’s pretty unheard of. He does this with everyone so I always get an early morning appointment because as the day goes on, the waiting is longer.

This is type iof doctor you want as your primary care physician. My specialists take time with me too except my opthomologist. But, if I were having problems, he would spend a lot of time with me also.

Anyway, here is the article. Many of you won’t be the least bit surprised...which is pretty sad.

/www.studyfinds.org/doctors-give-patients-11-seconds-describe-visit/

Sherrine
Forum Moderator/Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia, Crohn's Disease, Ostomy, Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease, Diabetes, Osteoporosis, Glaucoma, Scoliosis, Ankylosing Spondylitis
************************
God does not give us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. 2 Timothy 1:7

Acheybody
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 6005
   Posted 7/21/2018 11:21 AM (GMT -6)   
Nope, Sherrine, not surprised at all! sad

You may remember how I'd sing the praises of my wonderful internist years ago...the dr who diagnosed me with Fibro back in 1993. He'd listen thoroughly, look at all my records, discuss the latest research. Talked to me like one human being to another. He also looked for the cheapest and safest treatments. I trusted him implicitly. Very compassionate, and what a sense of humor! My husband even liked him.

Well, he changed drastically about 7 years ago, once he left his solo practice and became part of the huge medical complex we're now stuck in. He suddenly had to keep to those strict timetables and stopped listening or, seemingly, caring. He also got a near-fatal infection which kept him in the hospital for months, so we had to pick a new PCP (she's okay, very much head-in-the-computer the whole time.) He's back, but so different that we're not going back to him.

My hubby will be 65 next month and on Medicare. Of course, he almost never goes to the doctor for anything...the really big change will be when I turn 65 (January of 2020.) I can't wait!

I'm glad you've got such good doctors. They do still exist!!

Debbie
Fibromyalgia, degenerative disc disease, discectomy L4-L5 - (w/lots of Sciatic Nerve damage), frozen shoulder, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, IBS, migraine, dizziness (mostly from visual stimuli), elevated liver enzymes, tachycardia, hearing loss (probably Menieres).

Ljm2014
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 2229
   Posted 7/22/2018 12:49 AM (GMT -6)   
I feel,like my dr is not a great communicator..he has helped me with blood pressure and some general help for fibro..he is very good about giving you plenty of time..there s just something .at the same time..i go on medicare later in the year, so it seems like a bad time to change?

Lendi
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2018
Total Posts : 336
   Posted 7/24/2018 7:40 AM (GMT -6)   
Ljm2014 Medicare isn't a bad thing, actually. Once you get it all the paperwork figured out. There are usually people around to help you with that, too. I pay for a secondary but I'm pretty sure that the insurance co goes in the hole when all is said and done.

My Dr. is great. My only problem with him is he has a bit of a heavy accent and tends to talk too fast so I have to ask him questions if I don't understand. But, he gives me the time I need, has me come in every 3 months assuming I'm doing fine. If not I come in even sooner.

He cares, too. The concern shows in his eyes as well as laughter. I don't usually have to wait too long for an appointment to start but it's hard to get an appt. within a day or so if I get sick. But, I leave a message with his nurse and he usually works me in.

I was in once in the hospital to get an IV (dehydrated) and the nurse said that he had called to check on me. Probably seeing if I went, actually as I'm needle phobic. LOL But, she said he calls every night to see if any of his patients had been admitted and how they are doing. The nurse laughed and said the she told him they would call him but he calls anyway.
What if trials of this life are Your mercies in disguise.

Laura Short

"Blessings"

FM/CFS, BP, gastritis, diverticulitis, anxiety/PTSD, adult ADD, hypothyroid, brain lesions, sleep apnea that doesn't respond to a c-pap as far as sleepiness/fatigue goes, insomnia and only sleep in stages 1 and 2 and REM with a tiny bit in 3 and 4.

Chutz
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jan 2005
Total Posts : 9258
   Posted 7/24/2018 8:19 PM (GMT -6)   
I am so blessed with a wonderful doctor. If I need to talk he has all the time I need. If nothing has changed then he refills my prescriptions and off I go. He's always on time and really does care. I go once a month and everyone there feels like family. We live out in a small community and he's our best kept secret.

Warmly,
Chutz
Fibromyalgia, IDDM. UC, , Osteoarthritis and others trying to mess up life.
~~~~~
The microwave oven is the consolation prize in our struggle to understand physics. ~Jason Love

Lendi
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2018
Total Posts : 336
   Posted 7/27/2018 8:01 AM (GMT -6)   
Chutz, I was just thinking the same thing you posted. It just occured to me as I was reading other posts to ask what kind of area we live in. Is their a correlation to small rural areas over the big cities? I live in a small rural community. I've gotten angry with my Dr.s sometimes but it's usually because they care too much.

Not so much my specialists who are in the City closest to me. Some are great, some not so much.
What if trials of this life are Your mercies in disguise.

Laura Short

"Blessings"

FM/CFS, BP, gastritis, diverticulitis, anxiety/PTSD, adult ADD, hypothyroid, brain lesions, sleep apnea that doesn't respond to a c-pap as far as sleepiness/fatigue goes, insomnia and only sleep in stages 1 and 2 and REM with a tiny bit in 3 and 4.

Sherrine
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Apr 2005
Total Posts : 17897
   Posted 7/27/2018 9:44 AM (GMT -6)   
Lendi, I don’t think the size of the community makes a huge difference. It’s the knowledge and heart of the doctor that does. I have superb doctors. I live close to Tampa and we have around 250,000 in my unincorporated area! Most of my doctors are affiliated with a medical school in my area. See...I did my homework in choosing a doctors.

I moved here five weeks after my husband died. I didn’t know anyone or who the good doctors were. So the first Internist I chose was one about two miles from my home. I saw the sign. Perfect! (Remember, I did t know how to get around town yet!) She was lovely but was a pill pusher. When she took my history, I started crying lightly when I told her about losing my husband. She said I needed an antidepressant. I told her I’m usually a positive thinker but now I do have a reason to be sad and I know I will work through it without medication. We went back and forth on this and finally she moved on.

When the appointment was over I went to the desk to pay my bill. The doctor came running over to me with a bag that contained a month’s supply of Zoloft! This is after I told her many times I did not want to take medication for my sadness because I had a reason to be sad. I smiled and thanked her, drove home and threw the Zoloft in the garbage, (yeah I know I shouldn’t have done that) and then I started my search for a good doctor who would listen to me. That’s when I found my Internist. And, his office was only a half of a mile further down the road!

It’s important to do searches, ask people, etc. to find a good doctor/s. When I needed a Rheumatologist, my Internist gave me a couple of business cards of doctors he suggested. But I still did more checking. I checked online reviews. I have a friend with severe arthritis and I asked who her doctor was. It was one of the doctors that my Internist mentioned. But that wasn’t good enough for me. 😊. When I got my hair cut, I asked my hairdresser if her clients have mentioned good Rheumatologist in the area. She stopped cutting my hair and called a client she knew who loved her rheumy. Guess what? It was the same doctor! Well, three is a charm. I made an appointment and he is spectacular. So do your homework when choosing a doctor.

Sherrine

Sherrine

Forum Moderator/Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia, Crohn's Disease, Ostomy, Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease, Diabetes, Osteoporosis, Glaucoma, Scoliosis, Ankylosing Spondylitis
************************
God does not give us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. 2 Timothy 1:7

PattyLatty
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 2608
   Posted 7/30/2018 3:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Sherrine, I couldn’t agree more. I’ve been seeing an internist for over 20 years. She recently went back to school and became board certified as a lipidologist, which is great for me as I’m 69. A few years ago she changed her practice and went 100% to self pay as she no longer accepts any insurance. She told me that insurance requirements, such as expecting her to limit time with patients to 7 minutes, are absurd as she can’t be a good doctor under those circumstances.

$250 per office visit was more than I could stomach, especially since I have a few health issues, so I changed doctors. Three times. None of the three asked me any questions except those pertaining to my specific complaint that day. After three years, I went back to my no insurance doctor and am I ever happy that I did. I see her for an annual physical once a year, at which visit she spends an hour with me. 2 weeks prior to the visit I go in for labs so the first thing she does at my appointment is to go over my pages and pages of labs and compares them to last year’s numbers. Then we go over my questions, my meds in detail, my mammogram, bone density, and so on and so one. And we review reports from any specialists I’ve seen since my last visit. Her goal is not only to keep me alive and healthy, but to make sure I feel good. Not only that but she has a huge staff that is fantastic.

She really really cares. So if I have to give up a few things in order to pay to see the best, it’s worth it.

I’ve always felt that it doesn’t cost more, if using insurance, to see the top doctors. Someone graduated at the bottom of their Med school class, so we should do our homework and find the best and make sure they listen.

Luvzminis
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 2750
   Posted 7/30/2018 4:38 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm really thankful my doctor always takes time to listen. In fact, this made him very popular among the other doctors, and it quickly became difficult to get an appointment with him without waiting a few weeks--he booked fast!

The only thing is, he's near retirement age. shakehead He also moved to another (related) clinic a bit further away, but still in the area. There's a new clinic in my town, only a few miles away, but I have yet to get the courage to go there to find a new doctor. I guess I'll keep seeing my current doctor as long as he's still practicing. smile

It can be dangerous when doctors don't take the time to listen. Before I had my emergency surgery for the ruptured appendix, I saw the only doctor who was available that day (2 days before my surgery). He hardly checked me over and didn't say much--just thought I had some kind of bug and sent me home. I'm thankful I went into the ER when I did, and don't want to think of what may have happened if I hadn't. shocked
Pray, hope, and don't worry." St. Padre Pio


"The real things haven't changed. It is still best to be honest and truthful, to make the most of what we have, to be happy with simple pleasures and have courage when things go wrong." Laura Ingalls Wilder
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Tuesday, September 25, 2018 3:47 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 3,006,574 posts in 329,351 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 161838 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, jstew.
289 Guest(s), 13 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
George_, TruthSeekerSam, 81GyGuy, mattamx, island time, jberda1, Girlie, Zimica, InTheShop, UCinGV, MK1965, jwebb, iPoop