Antisphoild Syndrome (Sticky Bood)

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MetoYou
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2012
Total Posts : 97
   Posted 10/23/2012 3:20 PM (GMT -6)   
Does anyone have any info on this and how it can affect you in future i know it can only affect 20%of people out of 100% but i would like to know more info on this ANYHING PLEASE
 
Thanks

~SimplyUs~
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 10/24/2012 4:08 AM (GMT -6)   
Causes of antiphospholipid syndrome
In antiphospholipid syndrome, the body produces antibodies against phospholipids, a type of phosphorous-containing fat molecule that's found quite normally throughout the body, particularly in the membranes surrounding each cell.  Although the syndrome was first identified in patients with another condition called systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), it's now realised that most people with antiphospholipid syndrome don’t have SLE. However, there does seem to be some overlap in a small group of people between antiphospholipid syndrome and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE or Sjögren’s syndrome.

Who's affected by antiphospholipid syndrome?
People of any age and gender can be affected, although it's more common among women. As the effects of antiphospholipid syndrome become better understood, it's increasingly thought that as many as one per cent of the population may have some aspect of the condition. As a result it has been described as 'one of the new diseases of the late 20th century'.
 
Diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome
Blood tests are a good guide for diagnosis, but not totally reliable and so are used in combination with the patient's history. A simple blood test is used to detect the antiphospholipid antibodies (also known as anticardiolipin antibodies).
This test is positive in about 80 per cent of cases. Another test, confusingly called a lupus anticoagulant test (it's not a test for lupus), is also used to help confirm the diagnosis and this is positive in about 30-40 per cent of cases.
Blood tests should also be repeated as harmless antiphospholipid antibodies can be detected in the blood for brief periods (linked to infections and medications for example) giving false positive results for antiphospholipid syndrome. The Sapporo criteria is a classification method used by researchers, which defines antiphospholipid syndrome based on a combination of clinical and laboratory criteria.
 
Treatment of antiphospholipid syndrome
Treatment is simple and aimed at preventing the formation of clots or thrombus using aspirin or heparin, or both.
Only a low dose of aspirin is needed (75mg a day, which is about one quarter of an adult aspirin tablet).
A woman's chance of carrying a baby to term may be increased from 19 up to 75-80 per cent if aspirin is taken regularly and a heparin injection also given. Heparin doesn't cross the placenta and isn't known to cause any harm to the foetus, although long-term use may be linked to osteoporosis in the mother (newer low molecular weight heparin may cause fewer problems).
Once a thrombosis has occurred, warfarin is usually given. However, this treatment must be monitored and can't be given in pregnancy.
 
 
 

Disclaimer
All content within this post is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. This post is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis made by a user based on the content of this post.  Always consult your own GP if you're in any way concerned about your health.

Hanging in there like a monkey on a vine, knowing that through this journey; there is something positive to find.

~SimplyUs~
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2012
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 10/24/2012 4:13 AM (GMT -6)   
It means the blood stays thick-like and can start to clump up. This will cause blood clots that can be very dangerous. So the blood needs to be thinned down( medication) and monitored by a primary physician reqularly (pro-time checks). Take meds. listen to doctor. keep appoinments. and live a normal happy life without fear.
Hanging in there like a monkey on a vine, knowing that through this journey; there is something positive to find.

MetoYou
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2012
Total Posts : 97
   Posted 10/24/2012 4:24 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you it helps quite alot i know that i have this but just didnt no much i was more focused on the lupus than anything else but turns out this can be just as bad i was worried about pregnancy but there is, according to the source, still a 70 to 80% chance of a successful pregnanacy.

hannahp
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 5/27/2014 3:11 PM (GMT -6)   
I have this I'm on asprin daily I'm only 24 woo the joys of lupus
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