How to strengthen immune system

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physedgirl09
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Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 297
   Posted 7/17/2017 7:39 AM (GMT -7)   
Good morning everyone,

What do you guys take to strengthen your immune systems? I'm in antibiotics but i wanna start taking stuff to support the immune system, I just don't know where to start. Thanx!!

Pirouette
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Date Joined Mar 2014
Total Posts : 6042
   Posted 7/17/2017 7:55 AM (GMT -7)   
Good morning physedgirl09 -

This is a great question and we often talk about the fact that no Lyme & Co treatment can be effective without the support and participation of our own immune systems. And since 70% of our immunity lives within our digestive systems, gut health is critical. So, that's where I'd start!

DIET
I'd study up on the optimal diet for Lyme treatment, which has several nuances but generally is NO sugar, simple carbs, processed foods and some people do better with organic and non-GMO. Some limit grains, gluten. Some like to reduce red meats.

GI FUNCTION
If you have GI problems, it's good to understand what they are and what is driving them - GI damage? leaky gut? food sensitivities? yeast/fungal overgrowth? gluten sensitivity? poor diet? poor mechanics? too much or too little gastric digestive acids?

HEALTHY MICROBIOME
With all of the antimicrobials involved in Lyme & Co treatment, an imbalanced gastric microbiome is inevitable, which can trigger GI problems so some people like to try to replenish the good bacteria with probiotics, prebiotics, fermented foods. Some like to use betain HCL to rebalance bacteria.

REGULARITY
Gut health also relies on good mechanics, which means having regular bowel movements. A healthy gut requires sufficient fiber and of course, staying hydrated with adequate water intake.

DETOX
And gut health also might require help with detoxing - I've found that using binders is probably THE most important component of my protocol. There are many great binders to choose from - they help remove debris from what we're killing with the antimicrobials, antifungals, antimalarials and antiparasitic meds and all the toxins from daily life. They are critical for me and help keep me regular.

SUPPORT
There are also supplements and herbs that help with gut mechanics and overall health - when I was at my sickest, I used a couple of these but I'm not sure how much they really helped. I have also used low dose naltrexone (LDN) which I had good success with - it has many benefits and one is that it is supposed to help support immune function.

Hope this is helpful!

-p

Post Edited (Pirouette) : 7/17/2017 10:30:38 AM (GMT-6)


Purrrsiankitty
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Date Joined Dec 2016
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   Posted 7/17/2017 8:19 AM (GMT -7)   
I love your response , -P
Moderator, Lyme Forum

Dx May 2015 Quest pos Elisa/neg WB. Doxy only. Restest Igenix lyme pos, neg CDC, 18 +, **23-25 IND, *30 +, **31+, **34 IND, **41+, **83-93++. Retest12/16 Igen 41+, 83-93+ whole blood-plasmid pos. Retest Lyme/co's. Neg co's. Suspected Bart. 7/15 start 16 mo of doxy, azith, ceftin. Finished 09/16. Cowden start 12/16 and stop April 2017 to deal with yeast and leaky gut

PeteZa
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Date Joined Jul 2015
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   Posted 7/17/2017 8:26 AM (GMT -7)   
I agree completely with Pirouette. She said it so very well.

It is really not one "thing," herb or medicine. It is a lifestyle that helps the immune system.
____________

Good Article

physedgirl09
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 297
   Posted 7/17/2017 9:13 AM (GMT -7)   
Totally understand. I have to start taking better care of myself!

10LymeB
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Date Joined Feb 2017
Total Posts : 540
   Posted 7/17/2017 11:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Pirouette is right. My GI doc also recommended a product called Extreme Immunity. I take it (sometimes I forget) daily. Get it on Amazon. Supposed to help.
*42 yo - Treatment started Nov. 2016 - Bitten by mosquito in Paris 2013
* SIBO (improved) - Candida - Lyme - Babesia - Bartonella - Hashimoto's - EBV - HHV6 - Tinea Versicolor - IBS
* Mostly herbal treatment, Bryon White

caramba
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Date Joined Aug 2016
Total Posts : 582
   Posted 7/17/2017 11:47 AM (GMT -7)   
I'd add to overall health my typical supplement/vits recommendations.

Extra vitamin C
Extra Vitamin D3,K2

Turmeric (pills, and/or juicing)
NAC Alpha Lipoic acid (Liver health), Gluthatione, thistle Milk

Ensure Thyroid is within range (take Cytomel if needed etc)
Ensure adrenals are ok

Gracie0990
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Date Joined Jul 2017
Total Posts : 47
   Posted 7/17/2017 8:05 PM (GMT -7)   
What are binders?

julymorning
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Date Joined Jul 2015
Total Posts : 3808
   Posted 7/17/2017 8:16 PM (GMT -7)   
The role of Binders are to remove toxins out of our system, which are a big help to an overwhelmed body!

Two other areas that help the immune system is to TRY, as best you can, to minimize things in your life that stress you out, make you nervous, or fearful.

Don't set yourself up for confrontations. For what can't be avoided, practice relaxation techniques - whatever works for you. Time out for yourself away from everything whether it's outside, in the bath, or a short drive by yourself.

Negative emotions just ruin everything!

And do what you can to get a good night's sleep in a comfortable bed.
Moderator, Lyme Forum

Fibro diagnosed '85 Lyme (false?)positive '92,Osteoporosis, COPD, Hypertension, degen. disc disease, RMSF pos. Spring 2015, CHF, osteoarthritis. No LLMD. Used Doxy, Zithro and Flagyl s2015-16, mono each time. Useless. Current treatment JK, Milk Thistle, kudzu for head fullness/pressure, avena sativa for nerves, Lion's mane, Green Tea caps, Bragg's ACV, lemon water, chartab

Girlie
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Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 27139
   Posted 7/17/2017 9:15 PM (GMT -7)   
Gracie0990 said...
What are binders?



Binders are substances we ingest that bind to the toxins in the digestive system and eliminates them from the body.

Examples: Activated Charcoal, Bentonite Clay, Diatomaceous Earth (sp?) - all non pharmaceuticals

And Cholestyramine (prescription needed).
Moderator, Lyme Forum
Symp started April/2013; Buhner's Lyme May 15-July24/14; Igenex pos. July 3/14
Doxy: July 4-Aug.24/14;Zithro July26-Aug24/14; Amox + Proben. Aug. 29/14;
added biaxin Sept. 26/14
Disc. amox,added Ceftin Nov. 20th.;
Disc. biaxin added Buhner bart herbs Dec/14;Jan/15 pulsing Tinda (w/ Ceftin);
Abx/herb break Apr-July/15; July-mino; Aug. added Rif;
Nov./15 mino - to biaxi

The Dude Abides
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 392
   Posted 7/17/2017 9:26 PM (GMT -7)   
physedgirl09 said...
What do you guys take to strengthen your immune systems? I'm in antibiotics but i wanna start taking stuff to support the immune system, I just don't know where to start. Thanx!!


You might be interested in my post about the upcoming Immune Defense Summit that will be presented online for FREE from July 24-31, 2017.

bluelyme
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Date Joined Nov 2015
Total Posts : 4396
   Posted 7/17/2017 11:19 PM (GMT -7)   
cats claw , propolis,royal jelly , bvt , colostrum , reishi and more cats claw
bartonella , borrielia and erlichia all infect and disable white blood cells btw

Georgia Hunter
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Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 1989
   Posted 7/18/2017 1:46 AM (GMT -7)   
My view of the original question may differ from others, so it's just an opinion.

Our immune system suffers efficiency loss or a reduced capacity for two separate conditions: 1. Insufficient nutrients/products to make it function efficiently 2. Genetic down regulation to reduce immune function.

I'll discuss #2 first. Our body undergoes so much oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species when we are sick and have chronic inflammation that it just can't handle the overload of harmful compounds. Our body chooses the lesser of two evils and down regulates our immune response. You see it more with certain combination of pathogens, like Borrelia and Babesia or Borrelia and mycoplasma. When in this situation, if you increase your immune response, your oxidative stress levels will increase and be harmful. This is where the "low and slow" dosing of Lyme patients is helpful. It keeps oxidative stress slightly elevated but the body can still deal with it without having additional damage. If you don't remove the causing pathogens, you will never be able to advance your health back to where you were prior to infection. You can get better and function like a "normal" person, but with the pathogens there, I've never found an incidence where the body created epigenetic shifts back to what it was originally. It can happen but the pathogens must be at levels where they have insignificant effects on the body.

You see situation #2 in people with chronic infection or have had the disease for a long period of time. Situation #1 is different. It happens at onset of disease (I would say it is the cause) and progressively gets worse unless addressed. Our body had specific needs and when under the assault of constant infection, its needs increase. We do a poor job of giving our body what it needs because of our lifestyle at addressing these needs. Here is a list of some of the things our body gets low on when fighting infection and increasing these will help our immune response.

Zinc - probably one of the most important elements in our immune system. It is the tip of the spear. Zinc gets depleted as copper levels rise. You need to have adequate zinc levels for your immune system to function properly. Zinc deficiency along with Vitamin B6 deficiency can cause the condition of Pyroluria, which can cause nervousness, anxiety, depression, mood swings, and explosive anger. Does this sound familiar? Many of us go into and out of Pyroluria. Our diet often does not give us sufficient zinc and B6 to cope with our issues due to chronic infection. Eating a "normal" diet just isn't enough.

Copper - one of the most underrated elements of our immune system. Copper levels are greatly increased in the serum due to infection as it helps reduce pathogen levels. The zinc/copper ratio dictates our level of immune response and because copper is utilized so much to fight infection, its level often decreases over time because of insufficient intake. An increase in copper will reduce zinc levels and over time, the copper level drops and this reduces immune function. Is your serum copper level high or low? That is important for your physician to determine. If it's low, you need to supplement and too much can cause an issue due to situation #2 above.

Vitamin C - We know of its importance in our immune system but what do we do about it? We may supplement Vitamin C but do we use enough? Vit C is an acid and although we can tolerate very high doses, that may or may not be the best way to go. The science is still divided. For now, I say alter your diet to include foods high in Vit C. Suck the juice out of an orange, eat some kale, red peppers, or broccoli. This is important because as our inflammation rages on, our body continues to produce the molecules and products needed to fight inflammation. But it does have its limits. You wouldn't expect your car to run very fast all the time and not have to put more fuel in it. The fuel we need are polyphenols, flavins, and pterins. Those fancy words mean you need to eat a lot of raw plants, fruits, and vegetables. I saw Royal Jelly mentioned above. It's full of pterins and polyphenols. The bioflavinoids in oranges contain flavins and are most likely what Vit C such a good immune booster.

Boron - Boron is overlooked as something that helps immunity but without it, we wouldn't survive. Boron is unique in that it is in the periodic table with a row of metals but it isn't a metal. This makes it extremely important as a co-factor in many reactions. It affects thyroid function, estrogen metabolism, magnesium levels, and calcium deposition in the bones. Since we as Lymies need magnesium, increasing boron levels is the way to increase magnesium levels. That is why many thyroid patients don't respond like they should to magnesium supplementation. Increase their boron and their magnesium levels go up and helps with the thyroid. Many of us don't eat enough foods high in boron.

Glutathione - the number one antioxidant in our body. The more you make, the better off you are, but there are limits. Cancer patients are hypermethylators and that is a major hurdle. Too much methylation and you'll down regulate your CBS enzyme which alters transsulfuration. This increase will eventually deplete your molybdenum and Vit B6 (P5P). What to take from this is that you need sufficient molybdenum and Vit B6 in your diet to help overcome this pathway issue. (If you have it.) Once again, Vit B6 and molybdenum can increase problems so low doses with a slow increase. Eating foods high in these are even better. Too much taurine can be an issue but so can too little taurine. Schizophrenics have too much, depressed or anxious people have too little. Vision issues occur with too little taurine. All of these things are made in the process of making glutathione. If you have problems along this path, you aren't making enough glutathione. It's a complicated pathway and I don't do a good job explaining it so don't worry if you don't understand. Just look at what you are eating every day and ask yourself if it has the nutrients in it that you need. Google is your friend.

There are only a few of the many nutrients that will improve your immune system. Magnesium and Vitamin D weren't discussed but they also play roles and need to be increased. Eating is the key.

I edited this because I forgot to mention manganese. Without adequate manganese levels, dysbiosis will occur. Borrelia robs us of our manganese which alters our GI flora. We need to increase our manganese levels so that the environment of our GI tract can support lactobacillus. Without enough lactobacillus, everything goes wrong. If you want to recover from Lyme, get your lactobacillus and bifodobacterium levels back to where they need to be and keep them there. They're easy to get back, they are difficult to keep them up because of the manganese issues.

Post Edited (Georgia Hunter) : 7/18/2017 2:51:24 AM (GMT-6)


The Dude Abides
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 392
   Posted 7/18/2017 10:11 AM (GMT -7)   
Georgia Hunter said...
A bunch of amazing stuff that made my head explode.


Thanks so much, Georgia Hunter. I appreciate the great amount of thought and time that went into your comment. I like your perspective on giving our bodies the raw materials it needs, so it can perform all the necessary processes on its own, versus our trying to manipulate the body in ways we think are best.

I agree that food is the ideal way to do this. But, I've read so much about different diets that I have no idea who is right. That's one of my current hurdles, as there's so much conflicting advice. One common theme, of course, it eat more vegetables. That's about it, though.

As for vitamin/mineral supplements, I became frustrated with them, because I kept adding different ones until I had over 100 different types and I didn't seem to be getting any obvious benefit from them. I then figured that what's in supplements is probably not the same as what's in food. I mean, some of it may be the same, but "science" only knows what they know. They don't know what they don't know. (Not to get all Donald Rumsfeld on the matter.) So, for a while, I stopped all supplements and only continued low-dose naltrexone. Over the past weeks, though, I started adding-in some supplements again.

So, with all of that as some background, I wanted to ask your opinion of a few things.

1. How did you finally decide which "diet" (or, "eating style," if you like) was right for you?

People argue about raw vs. cooked, phytates in grains, lectins in legumes, nightshades and autoimmune, red meat and TMAO, PUFAs in poultry and pork, the insulin theory of obesity, saturated fat causing insulin resistance/obesity, cholesterol causing CVD, HCLF vs. LCHF, ketogenic diets, intermittent fasting, and on and on. I felt better when I didn't know anything.

2. Do you feel certain foods are universally "good" or "bad"? (e.g. grains, eggs, nightshades, etc.)

Same as #1.

3. Is there a preferred way to test for nutrient status? (e.g. blood tests, hair analysis, intracellular testing)

As one example: One of my hair analyses showed my zinc as elevated, but I was told this actually means my zinc is low, because it's being excreted out of the hair. Thus, it was recommended that I supplement with zinc. However, a different provided ran a RBC zinc test and it also showed as high. So, I had no idea if supplementing was appropriate. I've had thousands of dollars of testing from functional medicine doctors and question the usefulness of the results.

Any feedback will be appreciated, no matter how brief. Of course, I welcome thoughts from others, too!

The Dude

newuser22
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2017
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 7/18/2017 10:48 AM (GMT -7)   
Things that significantly helped me be functional without knowing that I have Lyme and without treating Lyme directly -

Iodine - makes big difference, important for immune, gut function, gut lining/leaky gut, works against pathogens. Thyroid, cellular energy. 5 to 10mg/day
Protein - if you have gut issues, long term infections and then the liver is too busy to maintain AAs. I took all individual AAs, it helped the immune a lot. Full AA profile is needed for making cells, immune components, anti bodies, enzymes.
Vit C
Vit B Com, Vit D, Vit E
Vit A, cod liver oil. A lot of it needed for immune, it is the immune signaling molecule. Gut lining.
Minerals - boron, zinc, Mg, Mn, Ca, K, Cr, Se
Good fats and phospholipids

Post Edited (newuser22) : 7/18/2017 6:43:32 PM (GMT-6)


mpost
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Date Joined Feb 2015
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   Posted 7/18/2017 4:22 PM (GMT -7)   
besides what was already said... SLEEP. it is instrumental for the immune system health.

- dont drink coffee except for early morning
- take at bed time: omega3, magnesium, melatonin, hawhorn
- go to bed at 10-11pm, dont drink too much water before
- if u wake up at 2-3am every night, check your hormones, consider taking ashwaghanda to regulate cortisol
- if all that does not work, take sleeping pills

sleep stops the inflammatory cycle, shifts energy to the immune system. if u dont sleep it does not matter how many pills u take and if they are herbs or not, u will not recover...

Pirouette
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Date Joined Mar 2014
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   Posted 7/18/2017 4:31 PM (GMT -7)   
All good input! Sleep is critical!

AWESOME, as usual, GH.

"...nervousness, anxiety, depression, mood swings, and explosive anger. Does this sound familiar?" ---have you been reading my diary?

I can handle the physical symptoms. But it's the neuro-psycho sx like these (and many others) that bring me to my knees. It's one thing to feel miserable. It's another, entirely, to feel like you're losing your mind, losing control, losing the battle.

-p
Lyme Moderator
Chronic late-stage lyme—likely infected in '00; Clinically dx Mar'14 w/ Babs, Fry Labs+ Bart-like, CDC+ Bb. First treated 4-5 viruses & GI/immune. Herbal antimicrobials in May; IV port-started Rocephin in Nov; added vancomycin Mar'16;
DETOX: Pinella/Burbur/Parsley/Milk thistle/Burdock/Red root; Samento/Banderol/Enula; JK/Turmeric; BFM-1; antifung; many many supps; cholestyramine!

magoo2
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Date Joined Mar 2015
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   Posted 7/18/2017 6:07 PM (GMT -7)   
Immune boost-remove root canals.

summer16
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Date Joined Jul 2012
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   Posted 7/18/2017 6:25 PM (GMT -7)   
P, I absolutely agree with your post!!!!!!!

PeteZa
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Date Joined Jul 2015
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   Posted 7/18/2017 8:18 PM (GMT -7)   
physedgirl09 said...
Totally understand. I have to start taking better care of myself!


Take small baby steps in doing this. Do not make it overwhelming.

One thing at a time.

Week one start drinking 8 - 8 ounce glasses of water a day. I filled a huge container with my 8/8 and drank it all. That was my easy way of doing it.

Week two cut your sugar down. If you put sugar in your coffee, switch to stevia. You will be surprised that a few drops of liquid are the same as 2 spoons.

Are you into fast food? You will be surprised that most grocery stores have organic salads in a bag now. Dressing included. There are lots of healthy fast foods. But veggies are awesome for a lyme patient.

Baby steps and make it a game so it is fun. Don't look at it as if it is a "sentence." You need to do it with a happy heart.

Good luck.

Georgia Hunter
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Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 1989
   Posted 7/19/2017 1:22 AM (GMT -7)   
1. How did you finally decide which "diet" (or, "eating style," if you like) was right for you?

2. Do you feel certain foods are universally "good" or "bad"? (e.g. grains, eggs, nightshades, etc.)

3. Is there a preferred way to test for nutrient status? (e.g. blood tests, hair analysis, intracellular testing)


There are some great answers in this thread.

Question #1: Trial and error. I looked at the chemical contents/nutrients in the food and matched that to my symptoms the best I could. Knowing that substrates/catalysts of the reactions are often the rate limiting step, I made sure I was eating sufficient amounts of magnesium, boron, tryptophan, zinc, manganese, copper, etc. Keeping a daily food log, I directly attributed what I ate to how I felt, good or bad. The bad feelings had to be accessed as a problem, if they were because of a herx, or because of an activity like exercise, flying, crying, etc. A pattern soon developed that was somewhat predictable. I studied each component of the food and exactly what it was doing physiologically. I tried varying the amounts of certain nutrients to see what would happen. I juiced, I ate vegan, I ate vegetarian, I had been eating high protein, I fasted, I tried just about everything I could think of and each method provided information that I would correlate back to the nutrients.

Question #2: I think we are all different and don't have any one food I would say is the best. I feel the antioxidant foods can be the most beneficial and that plants provide more essential building blocks to help us heal than anything. But if you don't have the bacterial flora to digest them, you could have problems jumping into a plant based diet as your oxidative stress will increase. If I had to pick one diet to single out as my favorite, it would be the Wahls Diet but since I don't/won't/can't eat seaweed, I'll just eat a modified version.
A good place to start is www.nutritionfacts.org Sign up for the email alert and you'll get a video every day or two and they are based on facts.

The reason the physicians or clinicians don't know about the specific things I often write about is because it is just too vast of a subject. I've studied molecular biology, cellular biology, chemistry, epigenetics, microbology, nutrition, and health for years and just about every week, someone on here writes something that I have to go research because I don't know about it. My recommendations come from experience but they can change as I continuously gather more data.

Question #3: I don't know if there is a preferred way, I used urinalysis from Doctor's Data to give info on toxic metals, essential elements, and amino acid levels. I know hair testing can be variable and I've never done any RBC testing. I would think RBC testing would be the most accurate but is it? I'm still low on certain nutrients. I think we all are and part of aging is the loss of some of these nutrients. How much did your sickness age you? I know mine aged me much faster than I had been aging.

The Dude Abides
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 392
   Posted 7/19/2017 11:40 AM (GMT -7)   
Georgia Hunter said...
1. How did you finally decide which "diet" (or, "eating style," if you like) was right for you?

2. Do you feel certain foods are universally "good" or "bad"? (e.g. grains, eggs, nightshades, etc.)

3. Is there a preferred way to test for nutrient status? (e.g. blood tests, hair analysis, intracellular testing)

There are some great answers in this thread.

Question #1: Trial and error. I looked at the chemical contents/nutrients in the food and matched that to my symptoms the best I could. Knowing that substrates/catalysts of the reactions are often the rate limiting step, I made sure I was eating sufficient amounts of magnesium, boron, tryptophan, zinc, manganese, copper, etc. Keeping a daily food log, I directly attributed what I ate to how I felt, good or bad. The bad feelings had to be accessed as a problem, if they were because of a herx, or because of an activity like exercise, flying, crying, etc. A pattern soon developed that was somewhat predictable. I studied each component of the food and exactly what it was doing physiologically. I tried varying the amounts of certain nutrients to see what would happen. I juiced, I ate vegan, I ate vegetarian, I had been eating high protein, I fasted, I tried just about everything I could think of and each method provided information that I would correlate back to the nutrients.

Question #2: I think we are all different and don't have any one food I would say is the best. I feel the antioxidant foods can be the most beneficial and that plants provide more essential building blocks to help us heal than anything. But if you don't have the bacterial flora to digest them, you could have problems jumping into a plant based diet as your oxidative stress will increase. If I had to pick one diet to single out as my favorite, it would be the Wahls Diet but since I don't/won't/can't eat seaweed, I'll just eat a modified version.
A good place to start is www.nutritionfacts.org Sign up for the email alert and you'll get a video every day or two and they are based on facts.

The reason the physicians or clinicians don't know about the specific things I often write about is because it is just too vast of a subject. I've studied molecular biology, cellular biology, chemistry, epigenetics, microbology, nutrition, and health for years and just about every week, someone on here writes something that I have to go research because I don't know about it. My recommendations come from experience but they can change as I continuously gather more data.

Question #3: I don't know if there is a preferred way, I used urinalysis from Doctor's Data to give info on toxic metals, essential elements, and amino acid levels. I know hair testing can be variable and I've never done any RBC testing. I would think RBC testing would be the most accurate but is it? I'm still low on certain nutrients. I think we all are and part of aging is the loss of some of these nutrients. How much did your sickness age you? I know mine aged me much faster than I had been aging.


Hi, Georgia Hunter. Again, I sincerely thank you for such a thoughtful response. You're very generous in sharing your vast knowledge. I appreciate you.

Given all the areas you've studied, I feel like it's impossible for a layperson like me to figure-out things on my own. The more I read, the more I realize how much I don't know. I feel like things shouldn't be so complicated.

Since becoming ill (this latest time) four years ago, I feel much more overwhelmed by even the smallest decisions. I don't recall having this issue when I was feeling well. Or, if I did, it wasn't nearly this bad. Now, if I have more than a few things to consider, my brain gets caught in over-analyzing all the purported advantages/disadvantages -- then trying to determine if those advantages/disadvantages are actually true -- and I have difficulty reaching a decision. It's maddening.

As for nutrient testing, I had considered SpectraCell (www.spectracell.com), but, again, I haven't made-up my mind. sad I've had a "NutrEval" test through Genova Diagnostics and a "Toxic & Essential Elements Hair Analysis" through Doctor's Data, but there seems to be no consensus on the validity or usefulness of these tests -- except for making money for the ordering providers by markups in the tests and/or selling a never-ending supply of supplements. I've not done any chelation testing for toxins/metals.

Anyway, like you mentioned about yourself, I feel my illness has aged me quite a bit. My eyesight is the latest thing to affect me. I hope you're doing well mentally, physically, and emotionally. From what I've gathered in your writings, it seems you work quite a lot. That would be tough enough when feeling well. Doing so when compromised, as we all know, is the worst. I wish you the best.

Oh, by the way, I have the audio versions of "The Wahls Protocol" (by Terry Wahls) and "How Not to Die" (by Michael Greger). Along with many others -- hence my "analysis paralysis." I also recently discovered that Dr. Greger launched a podcast in late 2016. So, I've been listening to the audio versions of his ongoing updates. The podcast can be found on Dr. Greger's website or via iTunes.

Here are some other audiobook titles I have:

* Clean Gut: The Breakthrough Plan for Eliminating the Root Cause of Disease and Revolutionizing Your Health by Alejandro Junger, MD

* The Autoimmune Solution: Prevent and Reverse the Full Spectrum of Inflammatory Symptoms and Diseases, by Amy Myers, MD

* Doctor Yourself: Natural Healing That Works, by Andrew W. Saul, PhD

* Heal Yourself With Medical Hypnosis, by Andrew Weil, MD & Steven Gurgevich, PhD

* Whole Grains, Empty Promises: The Surprising Truth about the World's Most Overrated 'Health' Food, by Anthony Colpo

* Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers, by David Perlmutter, MD

* 5 Steps to Restoring Health Protocol: Helping Those Who Haven't Been Helped with Lyme Disease, Thyroid Problems, Adrenal Fatigue, Heavy Metal Toxicity, Digestive Issues, and More, by Jay Davidson, DC

* Solving the Paleo Equation: Stress, Nutrition, Exercise, Sleep, by Garrett Smith, ND & Matt Stone

* The End of Dieting: How to Live for Life, by Joel Fuhrman, MD

* Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss, by Joel Fuhrman, MD

* 12 Paleo Myths: Eat Better than a Caveman, by Matt Stone

* Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition, by T. Colin Campbell, PhD

Again, those are the ones in audio format. I have many other titles in electronic format and some in print. This is why my brain short-circuited! smile

Post Edited (The Dude Abides) : 7/19/2017 12:44:02 PM (GMT-6)


Jinna
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Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 692
   Posted 7/19/2017 1:11 PM (GMT -7)   
What Georgia is saying sounds like most of the KPU protocol supplements.

Dr. K. says most lyme patients suffer from pyroluria that is why.


Something else missing in this excellent thread:

- raise of cell membrane potential: or there can't be good intake of nutrition and expelling of toxins.

Providing negative ions to the body was the best boosting I ever got (through my violet ray).

PEMFs are said to do that even better. High voltage (magnetism) boosts the ATP in the mitochondria.
Scott Forsgren has an article called

The Missing Link to Optimal Health: recharge your life with Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy

http://www.betterhealthguy.com/images/stories/PDF/PHA/2012_01.pdf

It explains what PEMFs do. It is impressive.

Dr. Pawluk also thinks it can help lyme patients.
PEMF helps reducing inflammation, improving circulation, reducing pain and improve value of other treatments.

Dr. Oz talks about that pain reduction with PEMFs.

Copy paste from dr. Pawluk:

One of the most important aspects of the use of PEMFs for Lyme disease management is to be able to uncover or expose the forms of the Lyme organism that hideout in the cell, hidden from detection by the natural immune system.

Antibiotics have not been found very useful for attacking these hidden forms.

PEMFs help to open cell membrane channels, allowing nutrients better access to the inside of the cell and also helping the cell to eliminate waste better.

By balancing the energy of the cell membrane, the cell will be healthier and more resistant to the hidden forms of the Lyme disease in the cell.

Lyme disease in the brain, called neuro-borreliosis, is especially challenging to treat.

Many medical treatments and nutritional approaches do not access the hidden Lyme organisms in brain tissue, due to not be able to get through the blood brain barrier.


PEMFs have been shown to increase the diffuse-ability of the blood brain barrier, allowing better access of treatments, supplements, herbs and nutrients into the interior of the brain’s nerve cells.

calande
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 44
   Posted 7/19/2017 10:56 PM (GMT -7)   
I suggest taking L-glutamine, L-lysine, and practicing sport at least 3x a week, even slightly. Muscles strengthen the immune system. Eat well also, e.g. organic whole eggs, white meat, red meat, lots of vegetables, and eat in quantity. You have to fight an infection after all.
Lyme disease since early 80's | ELISA & Western Blot: Negative ; Elispot Borrelia: Positive
Current treatment: (none)
Once a month: IV of Zn-DTPA & DMPS

The Dude Abides
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 392
   Posted 7/19/2017 11:26 PM (GMT -7)   
If one is able to endure a little exercise, I've heard that a rebounder (mini trampoline) is good for the lymphatic system.

Post Edited (The Dude Abides) : 7/20/2017 12:45:30 AM (GMT-6)

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