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Mergirl
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 1/20/2018 9:34 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi evervyone,

Need some help trying to decide what I can eat. Every week, going shopping in my confused state is a huge undertaking. I'm probably not eating enough because I'm afraid to eat most things.

I'm trying to eat things that are lyme and Candida friendly. I keep reading a lot of conflicting things on this.

I don't do a lot of cooking but I'm trying. I can't really follow recipes at this point. I was buying broccoli for instance and eating a lot of that with some chicken or salmon. Howwever, I just read that you should stay away from broccoli if you have a thyroid issue which I may have as well. Doing the tests for that now. It seems the more I read the more I learn what not to eat. It's driving me nuts.

I'm on a very, very tight budget. I cannot afford to eat all organic but the veggies I do buy I try to stay with organic as much as possible. I don't eat dairy,sugar, gluten and not may grains or carbs at this point. A sweet potato or butternut squash. I haven't been eating fruit in case I have candida.

My family member makes me chicken a lot but I know it's not organic so I'm afraid to eat that. But most times it's that or nothing.

So what can I eat and buy to eat when I can't eat much and can't afford much and don't cook much.

Any suggestions please? I keep losing more and more weight

Thank you. smile

Mergirl
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 1/20/2018 9:46 AM (GMT -6)   
Also, mold is a big concern so am I wrong to stay away from grains like organic oats, quinea, brown rice , etc?

sierraDon
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2016
Total Posts : 292
   Posted 1/20/2018 10:18 AM (GMT -6)   
I have been struggling with this too, i have oral thrush, but unsure if i have a candida overgrowth problem or not. from reading the symptoms I dont believe i have overgrowth, however some of those symptoms are the same as lyme...so I always question it.

i have been doing mainly proteins and leafy vegetables, soups. the occasional sweet potato, brown rice, or quinoa. Once or twice a week, steel cut organic oatmeal. hummus with celery, or cucumbers. maybe some nuts like pumpkin seeds. for fruit i have been sticking with the low glycemic fruits, just once a day. like berries, plums, pears, apricots. organic/non-gmo when available

its been over two weeks since i started this diet, it has been hard, but i think i am getting used to it.

Lapis_29
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2017
Total Posts : 882
   Posted 1/20/2018 11:22 AM (GMT -6)   

k07
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2015
Total Posts : 2556
   Posted 1/20/2018 11:31 AM (GMT -6)   
Eggs should be ok if you are not sensitive. I like eggs with spinach. Last night I did a version of taco salad - grass fed ground sirloin (made my own taco seasoning), lettuce, tomatoes, blk beans. Tonight probably chicken breast with a veggie. I am doing modified candida - so letting myself have small quantity of some things. Still drinking coffee with 1 tablespoon heavy whipping cream. No other dairy though.

I do eat quinoa too. Buy frozen bag with frozen stir fry veggies.

Maybe soup would be a good idea since you can use lots of veggies and have leftover?

Smoothie with blueberry, almond milk, spinach, strawberry (with chia or flax?).

Traveler
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 36310
   Posted 1/20/2018 1:02 PM (GMT -6)   
The fact is, while organics are better, not everyone can afford them. I know I surely can't - not if I want to eat more than 3 days a week anyway. Organics are not even offered in my area, unless you go to a health food store, and that's expensive here!!!

The main goal should be avoiding sugar, and getting the nutrients your body needs to function well and heal. If you have seen that dairy increases issues for you, then avoid it - but a few dairy products are healthy and needed by the body.

Personally, I've discovered what my body needs most - so I eat 1 egg, 1 piece of organic toast (made with a few alternative grains and nuts and seeds), and half of a protein shake, which is organic as well. I don't like food, and my body is not happy when I eat, so I keep it down to eating twice a day, so then I have dinner, which is usually a piece of lean meat, with veggies - or a more vegetarian meal, like chili.

Don't be "afraid" of the food though - it's your friend and the way you will get the nutrients for your body to function and to heal, so eat well. When we aren't in control of the food we get, it's a lot harder, as we still need to eat, but we don't get the same choices. Can you offer to cook (not sure of your energy levels) at least once a week to start? That would put you back in the 'drivers seat' with what to fix at least.
Herb only treatment for Lyme & Bart ended 12/11 - no active symptoms for 2 yrs -Herb only treatment for Babesia ended 12/12
www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=30&m=2977364
Had Lyme, Bart, Babs, RMSF, Ehrlichia, Myco, Anaplasmosis, EBV
New set of infections 8/2014 - still treating.
Come visit me: dogwoodtraditionals.freeforums.net/

PeteZa
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2015
Total Posts : 9729
   Posted 1/20/2018 1:28 PM (GMT -6)   
That statement about broccoli is for raw broccoli!! As long as you steam it, it is fine. Stay with the broccoli!!!

/www.drweil.com/diet-nutrition/food-safety/is-broccoli-bad-for-the-thyroid/

Nothing wrong with chicken. Just make sure the handlers are not leaving chicken juice where it can contaminate anything else in the kitchen. You can buy a turkey breast, that's an option.

I am a huge fan of fish and we eat it a lot. But I get mine from Alaska, wild caught and shipped in dry ice. If you can find a good reputable fish market, maybe try some fish. Sole is not fishy tasting. Cod isn't either. I love salmon, but it is fishy tasting.

When I tire of fish I make a sauce for the fish. I have made Asian sauces with soy sauce, ginger, toasted sesame oil, green onions, chili peppers.

Guacamole is always good on fish. Just avocado, cilantro and lime juice.

Garlic, lemon, butter sauce is always good on fish too.

Can you tell I love to cook? I have made up so many recipes because where I live, if you don't have it in your pantry, you have to improvise. The store is over an hour round trip.

Casa11
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2017
Total Posts : 223
   Posted 1/20/2018 2:57 PM (GMT -6)   
I’m not good with meals myself. Eggs. Salads .non starchy / or sweet veggies... olives. Avocados.

But I am better at snacks etc...I’ve begun to incorporate a lot of healthy fats. It might sound gross, but if I’m really unable to cook I can always add a spoonful of coconut oil & some collagen to a cup of tea. That’s been really helpful for me.

I also make turmeric coconut milk with cinnamon & sometimes ginger & stevia. It’s another drink that’s like a meal.

Another easy way to get good fats is to make “fat bombs” - if you look them up online you’ll find tons of recipes & you can usually modify them to suit any special needs. You can make a batch ahead of time & eat just one or 2 a day- it’s nice to have something “pre-made”... and that tastes good!

Mergirl
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 1/20/2018 5:44 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks everyone,

Going to try to look into these suggestions. All good ones.

So are grains like quinoa ok if there is a mold or candida issue?

Traveler, Where do you get that organic toast?

k07
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2015
Total Posts : 2556
   Posted 1/20/2018 9:28 PM (GMT -6)   
I’m pretty sure quinoa is ok with candida diet. I hope so since I ate it twice today!

I think sprouted gluten free bread (with no yeast) should be ok too. Maybe with almond butter...

The Dude Abides
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 1157
   Posted 1/21/2018 1:49 AM (GMT -6)   
Dear, Mergirl:

You've touched on a topic that is sensitive to me, for three main reasons:

1. I have my own frustrating experience with the topic
2. The conflicting "expert" opinions (books, magazines, television, websites, podcasts, etc.)
3. Some of the diet-related comments on this forum

In fact, item #3 was a major reason I previously quit this forum. In the past, I had a different profile name, and, out of extreme frustration, I deleted all of my posts and stayed-away for a good while.

(Yes, the topic of 'Diet' gets me that heated. In fact, I'm not sure there's another subject that troubles me even remotely as much.)

Anyway, eventually, I came back. This time, under a new profile name and with the intention to avoid the topic of diet. Lately, though, I've broken that promise to myself, by engaging in a few diet-related posts. I've done so without too much angst, so I thought I would roll the dice again. smile

First of all, you need to eat.

I'm not trying to be Captain Obvious with that statement. Nor am I trying to be funny. Quite the opposite. It's important that you keep that thought paramount in your mind, since you "keep losing more and more weight." You need calories.

Second, focus on eating food.

These days, with the many trendy, named diets (in my opinion, if a diet has a name, it's probably a fad), people with say or write "Eat REAL food." This induces an eye-roll in me, every time. Food, by its very nature, is real. So, unless you have a confirmed allergy or sensitivity to something, eat things that grow in nature and you can recognize and pronounce. You know what corn is. But, perhaps not Azodicarbonamide.

A sweet potato has vitamins, trace minerals, protein, etc. Plus, it has them in a complete package that your body recognizes. Contrast that with some highly-refined, processed food, such as a doughnut or something similar. The doughnut will likely have some synthetic vitamins that have been added-back to the refined flour used in its creation. It will also have a little iron, a little calcium, and even have a little protein. But, of course, we cannot say these items are equal, even if they shared the same nutrition profile.

Third, eating organic is not required.

Would organic be better? Perhaps. It depends on who you ask, who the grower is, where the food is grown, etc. Like nearly everything else, there are opinions (often heated) on all sides of the debate. Remember that even organic farmers have to treat their crops to avoid pests. You would do better, in my opinion, to eat conventional spinach, versus not eating any spinach. Do the best you can do, given your budget, available time, lifestyle, etc. As the saying goes: "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good."

Fourth, beware of extremes.

Should you decide to follow some trendy diet, for whatever reason, I would urge caution for any eating plan that has you either omit or rely on an entire food group (e.g. carbohydrates) or macronutrient (e.g. fat).

Fifth and finally, pilot your own ship.

I've read many comments on this forum where people want to be told what to do. Whether it's which herb(s) to take, which antibiotic(s) to use (or, if they should be used at all), or what to eat.

Unfortunately, YOU are responsible for figuring-out what to eat! It stinks, I know. I'd like to have the "magic" answer, too. But, it doesn't exist. Not to the level we would all like, anyway. The best we can do is make some general recommendations that would seem to do well for most. For example, author Michael Pollan's advice: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." That's probably a good start.

From there, experiment and see how you look, feel, and perform. Of course, check-in with your Doctor, too. Over time, your energy level, body composition, quality of sleep, and other markers should provide a feedback mechanism for you to make changes, if any.

Keeping a food journal would probably really help. Like, a lot. But, many people see this as too much work. It's really not and wouldn't need to be done forever. Just a few weeks would likely be helpful. The potential benefits far outweigh the perceived inconvenience. It also helps many people discover that they eat way more than they realize.

So, for what it's worth, those are my opinions. I'm not a Doctor, Nutritionist, or other healthcare professional. Take what's helpful and leave the rest.

. . .

Oh, as for broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables and their potential impact on your thyroid, please consider the following:

/nutritionfacts.org/video/overdosing-on-greens
/nutritionfacts.org/2016/02/09/how-to-cook-broccoli

With relation to human energy needs, it was not until 1894 that the kilocalorie was used in medical physiology texts. It was 18 years later, in 1912, that vitamins were first discovered. Think of the many millennia that passed, prior to these discoveries.

Now, surviving isn't the same as thriving. And, admittedly, the foods we have today are not the same as thousands of years ago. But, the larger point is we made it this far without the aid of diet books, without diet "experts," and we certainly weren't killed-off by broccoli!

Keep it simple, find your own eating plan, and be your own expert. You can seek the opinions of others, sure, but you cannot abdicate your responsibility or your health to them. That shouldn't seem scary, it should feel empowering. You have the control.

Best of luck and health,

The Dude

Girlie
Forum Moderator


Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 33965
   Posted 1/21/2018 2:15 AM (GMT -6)   
Good post, Dude.


Sorry that you felt the need to leave the forum at one point. But, glad you came back. smilewinkgrin
You have a lot to offer - (including some good common sense)
Moderator, Lyme Forum
Symp started April/2013; Buhner's Lyme May 15-July24/14; Igenex pos. July 3/14
Doxy: July 4-Aug.24/14;Zithro July26-Aug24/14; Amox + Proben. Aug. 29/14;
added biaxin Sept. 26/14
Disc. amox,added Ceftin Nov. 20th.;
Disc. biaxin added Buhner bart herbs Dec/14;Jan/15 pulsing Tinda (w/ Ceftin);
Abx/herb break Apr-July/15; July-mino; Aug. added Rif;
Nov./15 mino - to biaxi

The Dude Abides
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 1157
   Posted 1/21/2018 2:45 AM (GMT -6)   
Thank you, Girlie. That sentiment is especially meaningful, coming from you. I appreciate it.

My previous hiatus from the forum was my own doing. That is, no one person or post forced me to leave. I just felt I needed to do it for my own sanity, because the topic of 'Diet' is such a powder keg for me. What can I say...I have 'issues.' smile

On the topic of refined foods, here's an interesting post I found this evening:

/twitter.com/_DuckDodgers__/status/854540284373368834

There are 28 points. I was born in the wrong era, because I like #6.

Girlie
Forum Moderator


Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 33965
   Posted 1/21/2018 3:22 AM (GMT -6)   
"Who'd believe I was skinny and lonely a few weeks ago". tongue L M A O
Moderator, Lyme Forum
Symp started April/2013; Buhner's Lyme May 15-July24/14; Igenex pos. July 3/14
Doxy: July 4-Aug.24/14;Zithro July26-Aug24/14; Amox + Proben. Aug. 29/14;
added biaxin Sept. 26/14
Disc. amox,added Ceftin Nov. 20th.;
Disc. biaxin added Buhner bart herbs Dec/14;Jan/15 pulsing Tinda (w/ Ceftin);
Abx/herb break Apr-July/15; July-mino; Aug. added Rif;
Nov./15 mino - to biaxi

Post Edited (Girlie) : 1/21/2018 1:25:08 AM (GMT-7)


sierraDon
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2016
Total Posts : 292
   Posted 1/21/2018 10:37 AM (GMT -6)   
I agree with Dude, we all have to eat, and make good choices.

organic can be hard to get not only cost, but due to where you live. i live in Eastern PA, and growing season is done other than a few winter vegetables. so, there is not much in the way of fresh local fruit/vegetables available now, other than the high priced stuff that is in grocery stores.

so, i opt for picking the ones that matter, like organic kale or spinach, then conventional avocados for example.

JustPiccd
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2017
Total Posts : 84
   Posted 1/21/2018 10:56 AM (GMT -6)   
The best thing I have gotten in recent years was a pressure cooker that cost about 90 dollars (like an Instant Pot, but cheaper version) b/c it's so easy to throw in a bunch of things without a recipe and create meat and vegetable focused items and esp. quick healthy soups. I think slow cookers are great too though and can be as cheap as like 15 dollars. I'm mentioning mainly b/c I know how hard it is to try and think and figure all of this out and even having something like that simplified can really help.

It may also be useful to know that even really conventional brands are offering organic options a lot more now and selling them in stores that didn't always have them, and for many of these, coupons are often available (online, via coupon ordering services, etc.) so with that and sales it sometimes possible to get prices down to non-organic levels and stock up. Amazon sells Whole Foods generic organic brand now too, and the prices can be comparable to store prices for non-organics. (not trying to pitch Amazon! Just saying, for those who live in remote spots, esp.)

Eating a lot of eggs if you're not allergic, in my opinion, is an excellent and cheap way to get protein since there are many other nutrients, and maybe you could afford somewhat high-quality eggs since they're a less-expensive item. Almond butter also is sold in little packets now, so it may be one of those more-pricey items you could get occasionally as a mini treat as those packets sometiems go on sale.

I have to agree about the extremes though. If you *have to* then do it, but otherwise, I think diversifying is key to eating healthy, and trying to have as much variety as you're able to have. Being on a yeast-free diet for years for me didn't really "cure" my candida, I don't know if it's an aberrent strain or what, but I find I need pulse doses of antifungal meds too, and candida can be a sign of a messed up immune system (rather than the cause per se).

If you can tolerate garlic, it's really one of the best natural antifungals, so using it liberally will *also* help w/ candida. Also, you could try looking on www.localharvest.org to see if there are any farms near you that sell directly to consumers, it's often a way to reduce prices esp. if you can ever buy in bulk w/ something like meat and freeze it (or find friends who can split a big amt of meat), and often a good way to find "cleaner" meat (i.e. grass fed). I've had some success telling farmers I'm sick and can't get to them and working out arragnements for them to drop items off at closer venues for pick up since they sometimes are delivering to places "in town" anyway. You never know who might work with your needs until you ask.

PeteZa
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2015
Total Posts : 9729
   Posted 1/21/2018 11:19 AM (GMT -6)   
Dude, my favorite line you wrote is you are responsible.

I am glad I have choices. I am glad I am able to make my own choices.

I am a huge believer in moderation for my body. And, I tend to love variety.

I have a husband that eats super healthy, IMO, but he could eat the same thing every day for breakfast, or lunch or dinner. He loves it his way. I truly believe either one of us gets the same amount of nutrition. Actually his is probably more nutritious than mine.

I'm pretty sure I remember the thread you are talking about. I am just so glad you came back. You add to this forum, you really do.

Traveler
Elite Member


Date Joined May 2007
Total Posts : 36310
   Posted 1/21/2018 2:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Agreed, great post by The Dude! One day, maybe we can talk and you can tell me more about your absence from here? You're choice, but seeing as I was "captain" of this ship for a while, I'd like to know what happened and where I went wrong. I hate knowing that someone quit because of issues such as this. As I said, I completely agree with what you posted.

Mergirl
I now get "Dave's Killer Bread" - the Walmart here actually carried it!!! This is the type that I have chosen, but they have several others as well:
www.daveskillerbread.com/good-seed-thin-sliced
Herb only treatment for Lyme & Bart ended 12/11 - no active symptoms for 2 yrs -Herb only treatment for Babesia ended 12/12
www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=30&m=2977364
Had Lyme, Bart, Babs, RMSF, Ehrlichia, Myco, Anaplasmosis, EBV
New set of infections 8/2014 - still treating.
Come visit me: dogwoodtraditionals.freeforums.net/

samadhi125
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2018
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 1/21/2018 3:01 PM (GMT -6)   
I think what you're doing sounds really great! I too lost 30 pounds and couldn't gain any weight. I tried so many different diets that have been shown to help with Lyme but I never got any better until I tried the ketogenic diet. I think the biggest things are 1) healing the gut 2) giving up processed foods for sure and 3) eating whole, organic foods as much as possible. My doctor said the weight loss was due to not absorbing any nutrients due to leaky gut. The keto diet helped to heal my gut and after 10 months I'm now back at my normal weight and feeling so much better. Check out this article for some really good info on the basics of the Lyme diet that's recommended by quite a few practitioners.
[url]http://educatedlyme.com/2018/01/19/lyme-disease-diet-the-ketogenic-lifestyle/

Post Edited (samadhi125) : 1/21/2018 1:04:53 PM (GMT-7)


Mergirl
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2017
Total Posts : 205
   Posted 1/21/2018 5:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you everyone. I'm going to try to go through each of these suggestions when my head is a little less foggy. If that ever happens. Pretty sure I have CIRS but don't know at this point. I can't believe I feel like this.

Thanks Trav, for the name of that bread.

I'll try to respond a little more later. Thanks again to all.

Notime4lyme
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2017
Total Posts : 386
   Posted 1/21/2018 10:14 PM (GMT -6)   
I think having fat in your diet is key, and just eat what you like to eat (but not junk food). And I don't worry about how much I eat. I don't pay much attention to diets anymore. It is annoying that organic and everything is so expensive. There is a list you can google of the top ten things to get organic...but sometimes you just can't get organic. Non organic is probably just as good most of the time.

Lyme_CJ
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2015
Total Posts : 77
   Posted 1/21/2018 10:51 PM (GMT -6)   
Mergirl, I sympathize with a lot of what you're saying. It can be really confusing and conflicting advice doesn't help....well, no one knows everything and every body is different. And cooking isn't easy when I'm foggy or exhausted.

It looks like there's been some good advice already. I'll add what I'm doing. My ND (I don't think he's specifically an LLND) put me on GAPS, to "heal and seal", as they say, the guts. He gave me a farily detailed 6 (or so?) phase plan for starting on it over a course of weeks. After that, it's not too bad as far as restrictions and variety, but the added (available) complexity can be overwhelming. He also tells me I don't have to be perfect, which I sometimes take too far....

Anyway, his biggest thing he wants me eating is the bone broth, 8-12+ oz per day. Real thick broth, with all the fats and bone cooked down into it - that gels if you put it in the fridge. "The more animal fat you consume, the faster you'll get better." Or something along those lines.....suck (or scrape into the pot) the stuff off the bones, eat the giblets, leave the skin on, break the large bones and let the marrow cook out, etc.

Trying to keep it simple, I pretty much just throw an organic whole chicken in the crock pot with enough water to cover it. With the crock pot, you don't have to worry about forgetting it or being out and about - or stuck to the couch - when it's done, etc. After it's up to temp, at some point I take it out and apart on a large pan/sheet. I put the meat (and skin) into a big bowl, break up the bones a little, and put them back into the pot for another 12+ hours. Strain the bones out.

Then you have the thick broth and a bunch of meat. Can drink the broth by itself like that, (good hot), or sometimes I thin it out but have more in a day. Also use them both in soup - I'll just dump some of the broth and extra water into a pot, and heat it up with some veggies and then some of the meat. My ND encourages lots of garlic also, which is fine with me!

I try to eat at least one of those per week. If I would stick closer to the GAPS I think I would eat at least two per week, in the manner described just out of simplicity. I get the organic chickens at Fred Meyer's for $2.49 / lb, and often their pack date is the same day I'm shopping (in the evening.....sometimes I feel them to see if they're still warm o_O). That's not a bad price; another local grocer has a different national brand for 2.99, and my farmer friend has to sell his for even more (although they are better).

Also it only occurred to me today, freeze some of the broth and meat when you're having a good week - then in a bad week, you can still eat OK easily.

Another couple of basics are - have some fresh and cooked veggies every day too; eggs are good; and try to make the majority (I'm thinking he said 70-80%?) of food "savory", i.e. fatty meat and veggies.

Hope that helps. I know what the overwhelm is like at first, and the ongoing fogginess. The key is to stick with it as much as you can! And keep it as simple as you need.

PS I'm not sure I can say I've felt better since doing this....but I'm sure it can't hurt, probably does some good, and, well, I have to eat anyway.

Intuition
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 55
   Posted 1/21/2018 11:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Mergirl, I've found that I do well on a low-carbohydrate, high fiber, high protein, moderate fat diet with Lyme. I had gained some weight over the last couple of years, and this helped me lose all of it fairly easily within a few months.

You can download the free app Loseit! on the mobile app stores and keep track of everything you eat. I know this sounds like a lot of work, but in a Lyme brain-fog induced "stuper", it actually helps keep a clear track of everything, including your nutrients (carbs, protein, fiber, etc.) This makes it easier to look back and find possible foods that don't sit well with you if you feel like you've had a reaction to something. If weight loss is a concern, you can also track your weight daily by recording it in the app.

I see from your profile that you are in the northeastern US - for Organics, I've found that you can get most of your Organic product at an affordable price at places like Trader Joe's (organic fresh fruits and vegetables) and wholesale club stores like Costco, Sam's Club, and BJ's (organic salad blends, organic mixed greens, organic eggs, organic milk, etc.) Organic poultry and beef seems to be significantly more expensive than their non-organic counterparts nearly everywhere you go, but if you are committed to organics, buying in bulk and freezing pre-portioning servings is a great way to save a lot of money.

I've been following a low-carb, high protein diet for over a year and sticking strictly to organic produce, dairy, poultry, and meats and have found it to be relatively affordable if I plan a list out ahead of time, buy in bulk, and hit 2 or 3 stores and buy the items I needs wherever they tend to be the cheapest (I can get Organic Chicken Breasts for $5.50/lb @ Wegmans vs $8+/lb @ Trader Joe's, but Trader Joe's has a better deal on Organic Tomatoes, so I go to both stores in the same night and shop accordingly) It sounds like a lot of effort, but after a few grocery shops, you will get a feel for what stores have the best deals for each frequently purchased item, and you can plan your next trip accordingly.

If you are in an area where you have multiple store options, and have Trader Joe's and/or Costco / BJ's nearby, there is absolutely no reason to shop for organics at a normal grocery store. I have found that the prices are almost always significantly higher.

Another tip for everyone: Grocery Shop on Wednesday evenings after 8PM - the stores are almost always empty. I started doing this a long time ago when I was suffering from dizzy spells and panic attacks - shopping in a busy, crowded store and waiting on long lines was near-torture while dealing with those symptoms. Now, I'm feeling much better, but continue to try and shop on Wednesday nights because it cuts down shop time significantly, and you basically have the store to yourself.

Post Edited (Intuition) : 1/21/2018 9:41:40 PM (GMT-7)


MagnoliaCee
New Member


Date Joined Apr 2017
Total Posts : 3
   Posted 1/22/2018 2:00 AM (GMT -6)   
I will say that though I am not healed and had a relapse I use food to keep myself from being bedridden as I once had been. I spent two years in bed in agony and sweats. I will write my full story in the next day or two to explain.
My advice is simple. Nutrient-dense fresh foods, no dairy, low sugar, healthy fats and no stress about eating. The stress about food is worse than what you eat. I also think it is a mistake to be so strict that life is a misery. I love potato chips, so I eat Trader Joe's olive oil sea salt chips. I love french fries, so I buy Trader Joes frozen fries for snacks. Because they give me joy. I eat organic dark chocolate because I want to.
Investigate intuitive eating, and once you learn to listen to your body you know what it wants, and you start to see what foods feel good when you eat them. My body loves seeds, fruit, veggies, spice, etc.
Always think about your liver and what food are liver friendly. We need a healthy liver to flush out the toxins from our treatments. Dr. Cabot is a liver doctor, and she has a website about healing the liver and gut with lists of liver friendly foods. Lyme and co-infections damage the liver as it did mine and I am now fully rejuvenated from beginning stages of fibrosis, and I was jaundiced.
I stay away from processed as much as I can, and I absolutely avoid cheap sweeteners, preservatives, chemicals. The less my body has to filter out the better I feel.
A plant focused diet is easy on the system and the wallet. 4 or so ounces of animal protein is enough, and it should be lean but not every meal and not necessarily every day. It is easier on our vulnerable system.
Instant pots, slow cookers, stir-frys with precut veggies, soups, store roasted whole natural chickens, some healthy frozen items, and meals, jars of healthy marinara sauce, salsa, marinades, salad dressings, paleo wraps, fermented foods daily and yummy treats. I eat a salad every day but I am creative with it. Low gluten but I still eat cookies if I want them. I have a green drink twice a day in case I am lazy and choose a dairy-free frozen meal and a store-bought cup of soup.
Take as much stress out of it while making solid nutrient choices and you should be fine. Our bodies are so depleted from this disease we need as much nutrition in each bite as we can get while not being obsessive about it.
There are great dairy replacements nowadays too so no need to feel deprived.

Dirtfarmerswife
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2017
Total Posts : 22
   Posted 2/5/2018 2:10 AM (GMT -6)   
I would love to know this groups take on dairy. Namely, grass fed butter, cream cheese, heavy whipping cream. I have read that these are okay because of the lack of casein ? If this is accurate, it would make this girl very happy!
Bit 7/16/17, 8/1/17 started !00 mg Doxy 2 x a day 28 days,
10/2 /17 started w/ LLMD Doxy 100 mg 2X a day & Ceftin 500mg 2X a day.
01/09/18 stopped Doxy. Bactrim DS 800-160mg 2X day & Ceftin 500 2X a day.
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