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alunke82
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2017
Total Posts : 296
   Posted 2/11/2018 5:56 AM (GMT -6)   
hi all i got testet by an private doctor for vitamin loss and i was way under the lowest but the test is a complete one so i cant see what vitamins i need but my question is if i start to take a vitamin and if i need it can i experience some side effect before my body get used to it?sry my english
i started 1000 mg c vitamin yesterday and today again have done it before every time i take c vitamin my knockles start to hurt on my left hand is this a sign i need vitamin c?

Post Edited (alunke82) : 2/11/2018 7:47:34 AM (GMT-7)


Girlie
Forum Moderator


Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 32685
   Posted 2/11/2018 1:22 PM (GMT -6)   
alunke - you should be able to get some testing on individual vitamins - in particular b12 and vitamin d are a couple that Lyme patients get checked.

I don’t know why your knuckles are reacting to vitamin c.

What type of vitamin c is it?
Maybe start off with a lower dose - like 200 mg and see how you feel - you can then increase.
Moderator, Lyme Forum
Symp started April/2013; Buhner's Lyme May 15-July24/14; Igenex pos. July 3/14
Doxy: July 4-Aug.24/14;Zithro July26-Aug24/14; Amox + Proben. Aug. 29/14;
added biaxin Sept. 26/14
Disc. amox,added Ceftin Nov. 20th.;
Disc. biaxin added Buhner bart herbs Dec/14;Jan/15 pulsing Tinda (w/ Ceftin);
Abx/herb break Apr-July/15; July-mino; Aug. added Rif;
Nov./15 mino - to biaxi

The Dude Abides
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 1135
   Posted 2/11/2018 2:30 PM (GMT -6)   
From my experience, most nutrient testing is based on what's floating-around in your blood. What's more important, I believe, is what's actually in your cells.

Back in 2014, I spent over $600 USD on a "NutrEval Plasma" test, that, in hindsight, may have been mostly useless -- along with most other testing from well-meaning-but-misguided Integrative/Functional Medicine Doctors.

An intracellular test like one from SpectraCell may be worth considering, either in place of or in conjunction with your plasma test(s). Assuming you feel the need to have more testing.

www.spectracell.com

If something is "low," the question should be "Why is it low?" Taking handfuls of isolated supplements might increase the number on a lab test. But, is it fixing the underlying cause? Or, simply addressing a symptom?

As for your introducing supplements, it would be a good idea to keep a journal to track as many factors as you can -- food intake, beverage intake, medications and doses, supplements and doses, weather (temperature, humidity, barometric pressure), and anything else.

I believe people frequently make erroneous correlations between their actions and what happens as a result. Having information recorded in writing can help you spot patterns and make associations more accurately.

Georgia Hunter
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 2116
   Posted 2/11/2018 3:12 PM (GMT -6)   
The Dude Abides said...
From my experience, most nutrient testing is based on what's floating-around in your blood. What's more important, I believe, is what's actually in your cells.

Back in 2014, I spent over $600 USD on a "NutrEval Plasma" test, that, in hindsight, may have been mostly useless -- along with most other testing from well-meaning-but-misguided Integrative/Functional Medicine Doctors.

An intracellular test like one from SpectraCell may be worth considering, either in place of or in conjunction with your plasma test(s). Assuming you feel the need to have more testing.

www.spectracell.com

If something is "low," the question should be "Why is it low?" Taking handfuls of isolated supplements might increase the number on a lab test. But, is it fixing the underlying cause? Or, simply addressing a symptom?

As for your introducing supplements, it would be a good idea to keep a journal to track as many factors as you can -- food intake, beverage intake, medications and doses, supplements and doses, weather (temperature, humidity, barometric pressure), and anything else.

I believe people frequently make erroneous correlations between their actions and what happens as a result. Having information recorded in writing can help you spot patterns and make associations more accurately.

Good post.

Girlie
Forum Moderator


Date Joined May 2014
Total Posts : 32685
   Posted 2/11/2018 3:18 PM (GMT -6)   
Has anyone used Spectracell to determine what their deficiencies are?

I'm curious.
Moderator, Lyme Forum
Symp started April/2013; Buhner's Lyme May 15-July24/14; Igenex pos. July 3/14
Doxy: July 4-Aug.24/14;Zithro July26-Aug24/14; Amox + Proben. Aug. 29/14;
added biaxin Sept. 26/14
Disc. amox,added Ceftin Nov. 20th.;
Disc. biaxin added Buhner bart herbs Dec/14;Jan/15 pulsing Tinda (w/ Ceftin);
Abx/herb break Apr-July/15; July-mino; Aug. added Rif;
Nov./15 mino - to biaxi

Raleighgirlie
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 140
   Posted 2/11/2018 7:39 PM (GMT -6)   
Good question Girlie, I am curious as well.

oregonhay
New Member


Date Joined Jul 2017
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 2/11/2018 11:58 PM (GMT -6)   
I found some vitamins make me feel worse. Vitamin C, D, and B. Sometimes magnesium. I tested extremely low on Vitamin D and started to take it as per doctor request, but felt horrible after a week. Because of that, I never take Vitamin D (but I work outside all day). I occasionally take C and B -- but only a small amount like I will nibble 1/3 of a pill once a week. I try to take my nutrients in food. If you can, do this. There's no point in taking high dosage raw vitamins if they end up supercharging your disease and making you feel worse. Take low dosage raw food and healthy sunshine is my advice. Again not a doctor, but make sure when you take things you isolate them individually to see if they have negative effects. I take mine Saturday so if they make me feel bad, I have Sunday to rest. If you take them all at once, you won't know which one is causing the problem. Also there is a possibility that two are interacting, you have to consider that. It blows my mind doctors don't appear to consider any of this. I am not a doctor so please consider you are getting advice from some random stranger on the Internet, but I try to make it sound.

The Dude Abides
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2017
Total Posts : 1135
   Posted 2/12/2018 6:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Georgia Hunter said...
The Dude Abides said...
From my experience, most nutrient testing is based on what's floating-around in your blood. What's more important, I believe, is what's actually in your cells.

Back in 2014, I spent over $600 USD on a "NutrEval Plasma" test, that, in hindsight, may have been mostly useless -- along with most other testing from well-meaning-but-misguided Integrative/Functional Medicine Doctors.

An intracellular test like one from SpectraCell may be worth considering, either in place of or in conjunction with your plasma test(s). Assuming you feel the need to have more testing.

www.spectracell.com

If something is "low," the question should be "Why is it low?" Taking handfuls of isolated supplements might increase the number on a lab test. But, is it fixing the underlying cause? Or, simply addressing a symptom?

As for your introducing supplements, it would be a good idea to keep a journal to track as many factors as you can -- food intake, beverage intake, medications and doses, supplements and doses, weather (temperature, humidity, barometric pressure), and anything else.

I believe people frequently make erroneous correlations between their actions and what happens as a result. Having information recorded in writing can help you spot patterns and make associations more accurately.

Good post.


Thank you, my good man. As Dean Martin used to tell Frank Sinatra: "It's your world. I'm just living in it." smile

Even while practicing a mostly Low-Carb-ish/Paleo-ish diet, from 2009-2013, I was worried about living in an echo chamber. So, I also listened to podcasts and read blogs about other dietary approaches such as Vegan, Vegetarian, Fruitarian, Raw, Starch-Based, Weston A. Price, Ketogenic, PāNu/Archevore, Primal Blueprint, Whole30, Autoimmune Protocol, GAPS, Low-FODMAP, etc.

After a while, I was buying more books/audiobooks of Vegetarians/Vegans than the Paleo/Primal/Low-Carb folks. Especially after I got sick in 2013. The main folks to which I gravitated were John McDougall, Nathan Pritikin, Jeff Novick, Pam Popper, Joel Fuhrman, Michael Greger, Caldwell Esselstyn, and T. Colin Campbell. Of the books I've read/listened, probably the most influential have been:

* The End of Dieting, by Joel Fuhrman, MD
* How Not to Die, by Michael Greger, MD
* Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition, by T. Colin Campbell, PhD with Howard Jacobson, PhD

The following quote from Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition was one of many interesting examples:

"In studying the apple, Professor Liu and his team began by choosing to focus on vitamin C and its antioxidant effect. They found that 100 grams of apples (about a half cup) had an antioxidant, vitamin-C like activity equivalent to 1,500 milligrams of vitamin C, (about 3 times the amount of a typical vitamin C supplement). When they chemically analyzed that 100 grams of the whole apple, however, they found only 5.7 milligrams of vitamin C, far below the 1,500 milligrams that the level of antioxidant activity associated with the vitamin C indicated.

The vitamin-C like activity from 100 grams of whole apple was an astounding 263 times as potent as the same amount of the isolated chemical! Said another way, the specific chemical we refer to as vitamin C accounts for much less than 1 percent of the vitamin C-like activity in the apple – a miniscule amount. The other 99-plus percent of this activity is due to other vitamin C-like chemicals in the apple, the possible ability of vitamin C to be much more effective in context of the whole apple than it is when consumed in an isolated form, or both."
(Pg. 152-153)

After considering this information, along with many others ideas from the aforementioned people, I stopped swallowing handfuls of supplements and began to more closely question their safety and efficacy, along with scrutinizing medications, lab testing, lab reference ranges, diet claims, and so forth.

While I certainly don't have all the answers, I think having a general framework within which to operate (e.g. eat food as grown) is more helpful than to have specific rules that are applied to all and that do not change (e.g. avoid carbohydrates).

Allegedly, Oscar Wilde stated: "Everything popular is wrong." Whether or not he actually said it, I think there may be something to that quote.

Georgia Hunter
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 2116
   Posted 2/13/2018 3:17 AM (GMT -6)   
I've read Fuhrman, Greger, Campbell, and Wahls. When combining my chemistry and anthropology background with Horowitz, Singleton, Yu, Yasko and Lynch, it makes for some interesting thoughts.

Wahls and Yasko have had the most influence on me.
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