A Case of Post-Lyme Disease Syndrome (PLDS) Involving Motor Neuropathy and Myositis

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mpost
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Date Joined Feb 2015
Total Posts : 1527
   Posted 5/22/2018 6:27 AM (GMT -6)   
ABSTRACT

A 53-year-old man presented with bilateral foot drop. His lower-extremity weakness predominantly affected the distal
right limb. He presented hypercreatine kinasemia and high antibody titer for Borrelia species (spp). The nerve conduction
study and needle electromyography suggested active neurogenic findings, indicating motor neuropathy. The gastrocnemius
muscle biopsy showed scattered fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration, representing myositis. After administration of minocycline, Borrelia spp antibodies became negative. Symptoms gradually improved with repeated intravenous immunoglobulin administration. This is a very rare case of post-Lyme disease syndrome involving motor neuropathy
and myositis, which represents an immune-mediated reaction to Borrelia spp infection.

/bit.ly/2IGogCC

Post Edited (mpost) : 5/22/2018 5:45:20 AM (GMT-6)


mpost
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Date Joined Feb 2015
Total Posts : 1527
   Posted 5/22/2018 6:39 AM (GMT -6)   
"After admission, the patient was treated with minocycline for 5 months
because serum IgG antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi antigens was detected.
He was treated with prednisolone (20 mg/day) concurrently.
Symptoms improved transiently, and the patient subsequently experienced
gradual progression, even after the antibody was no longer detectable.
He therefore underwent repeat treatments with intravenous immunoglobulin."

sooooo ..... the Department of Neurology, Tokyo Women’s Medical University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, treats people with persistent lyme symptoms with .. 5 months of mino, then IVIG ?!!! why ??! i thought lyme is easy to cure with 2 weeks of doxy ?!?!?

sierraDon
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2016
Total Posts : 289
   Posted 5/22/2018 8:01 AM (GMT -6)   
in study's like this, how do they do the western blot's differently than say a reputable TBD testing lab like mdl, igenix, armin, etc.? I am assuming in Tokyo they didn't use one of these labs.

how do they know its NOT a false negative?

mpost
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Date Joined Feb 2015
Total Posts : 1527
   Posted 5/22/2018 2:57 PM (GMT -6)   
sierraDon said...
in study's like this, how do they do the western blot's differently than say a reputable TBD testing lab like mdl, igenix, armin, etc.? I am assuming in Tokyo they didn't use one of these labs.

how do they know its NOT a false negative?


i have no doubt he still had borrelia when they considered him "cured". that is not the point. the point of my link is look, a hospital in japan treating a lyme sick person with 5 months of minocycline. While the official CDC response in US is one month will suffice.

So reputable infectionist doctors in one of the most prestigious Tokyo hospitals treat lyme patients with half year of antibiotics ??! WHY ?! Why not just 20 days ?

u know a lie is a lie because it is inconsistent. "A lie has no legs", therefore u can "catch it" quite easily, if that is what u are after...

mpost
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2015
Total Posts : 1527
   Posted 5/23/2018 3:00 PM (GMT -6)   
just wanted, again, to highlight how one of the most prestigious hospitals in Japan treats lyme patients with 5 months of minocycline.

It is not 30 days, not 20 days ... it's 5 months ! In a public hospital, not some fringe private lyme clinic !

My head feels like it's going to explode. CDC saying on their page that 30 days of antibiotics will suffice.

What are the japanese doctors doing , wasting so much minocycline on patients ? nono Why ?

sierraDon
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2016
Total Posts : 289
   Posted 5/23/2018 5:58 PM (GMT -6)   
I am not suprised, Japan does some things more advanced, while other things not. I worked for a Japanese pharma company for a number of years, and they were quite antiquated with a lot of their methods. culturally way different. a lot of cases change doesn't come easy there.

in my rifabutin research, i read a similar article where an HIV patient diagnosed with b.quintana and was treated with rifabutin and given doxycycline for good measure to treat "other bacteria", and they claimed he recovered.
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