New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Nin
New Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 5/6/2012 12:14 PM (GMT -6)   
 
Hi!  I am new here; had been doing some searching and came across this site.  I just wanted to post a little information about the use of LDN (low dose naltrexone) for the treatment of MS.  My niece has had great success with it.  It does not cure, but slows the progression and reduces the liklihood of relapses.  I recommend 2  books: 
 

Up the Creek with a Paddle: Beat MS and Many Autoimmune Disorders with Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) [Paperback]

 
and
 

The Promise Of Low Dose Naltrexone Therapy: Potential Benefits in Cancer, Autoimmune, Neurological and Infectious Disorders [Paperback]

Elaine A. Moore <input id="contributorASINB001JRZ6RA" value="B001JRZ6RA" type="hidden"> (Author), Dr. Yash P. Agrawal (Foreword), Samantha Wilkinson (Collaborator)
 
 
VERY worth checking into.  No promises that you will never have a relapse, but the first my niece had in 6 % 1/2 years was after the birth of her third child AFTER she had been sick.  And, even at that,  no new symptoms and none that were anywhere nearly as bad as the first year when she was on Rebif. 
 
Maybe someone else has already discussed LDN.  But whether or not, please consider looking into it...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 

Tranquilrain
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 48
   Posted 5/31/2012 10:15 AM (GMT -6)   
Strange, but every time I bring up LDN to my Neuro. he shoots it down. Can you tell me more about it?

Nin
New Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 5/31/2012 11:52 AM (GMT -6)   

Sure! And I really do encourage you to read the books I mentioned. The second one, "The Promise of Low Dose Naltrexone Therapy" is a more clinical book and the one to ask your doctor and/or neuro to read. It also has in the back a list of resources such as doctors who prescribe it and pharmacies that can prepare it.

 

First, naltrexone (the "N" in LDN) is a drug that was long ago approved by the FDA in doses of 50mg to be used in the treatment of narcotics addiction. So, there is no legal prohibition for a doctor to prescribe it for something like MS. The naltrexone dose used in LDN ranges from around 2mg to 5mg depending on the situation, age, size, etc. of the patient. It is so safe at that level that my niece did not even have to go off of it while she was pregnant. It is not effective if you are also taking narcotic-based pain medication (for obvious reasons since naltrexone is used in the treatment of narcotics addiction). As far as I have learned, side effects seem to be minimal and mainly consist of vivid dreams at first, but this fades.

The way LDN seems to work is that it suppresses the body's production of endorphins. This results in the body overcompensating by producing more than it usually would when the drug wears off which helps the body's immune system get more in balance. MS is an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system functions improperly (as I am sure you know); LDN helps to correct that.

 

Again, it is not a cure, but does significantly slow progression. It does not mean you will never have a relapse, but I as mentioned in my first post, my niece had her first one in 6 & 1/2 years and we could pretty much track why. She had to do the typical bout with steroids, but stayed on LDN during that and is now back to nursing her new baby (only on the LDN again). And, I will stress again, she had no new symptoms with her relapse and none of them were anywhere near as bad as they had been before she started the LDN.

 

You may want to check out the LDN homepage: http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/ which has the latest on research, etc. It is a great resource. Another great resource is Skip's Pharmacy. They are located in Florida, but have a website: http://www.skipspharmacy.com/. Dr. Skip is one of the early proponents of using LDN for MS and has a whole section on it.

 

You may have to be open to changing your neuro if you want to try LDN and he refuses to treat you. My niece did have to change hers. The neuro does not have to be the one to prescribe, but he may be unwilling to continue seeing you if you find another way. The resources I mentioned in the back of that book may be helpful.  I can't speak to your situation, but my niece is glad she changed neuros.

 

Good luck and let me know how it goes! I'll send up a prayer!


Tranquilrain
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 48
   Posted 5/31/2012 2:01 PM (GMT -6)   
I have an pump inside my body and a cath. or small tube runs the medicine directly into my spine. Bachlofen and Morphine.. I don't think this will work :-(

Nin
New Member


Date Joined May 2012
Total Posts : 5
   Posted 5/31/2012 2:48 PM (GMT -6)   
Well, I think you can be taking the baclofen - I don't believe it is a narcotic.  However, the same is not true of the morphine.  If you can find a non-narcotic alternative to the morphine, you could try LDN.  And, maybe, the LDN would help you not need it in the future. 
 
From your other posts, I see you have had MS for quite some time.  I want to make sure you understand that LDN will not repair old damage, altho there are often improvements of more recent issues.  If I were you, I would call Skip at that pharmacy I told you about and see if he has suggestions. He knows a lot about all aspects of MS and LDN and would provide a wealth of knowledge for you.  I hope you explore this option to its fullest just to be sure that you are not missing out on something that would help you. 
 
Please keep me in the loop! 
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Friday, July 20, 2018 7:27 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,983,782 posts in 327,147 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 161943 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, CJohnson.
424 Guest(s), 4 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
ToddPaul, Kippette, Noah2112, CAdogsRus