Word definition...

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Allison77
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Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 421
   Posted 3/8/2010 5:11 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Everyone,
I've been perusing peoples post's and have come to realize: I need a PHD to understand half the definitions...Im positive I can't be the only one that looks at some of the "big word wednesday's" and shakes their head in total confusion.
Perhaps we can start a definition post of all the possible words we come across?
 
-Allie
RX Crohn's 1999, over 30 surgeries, 3 strokes, permanent colostomy and rectum removal.
 
"The most unfortunate thing that happens to a person who fears failure is that he limits himself by becoming afraid to try anything new."


Marsky
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Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 3/8/2010 5:56 PM (GMT -7)   
These are medical abbreviations but are helpful to know:

CA - short for cancer/carcinoma (not California!)

NPO - nothing by mouth or officially nothing per os.

PRN - as needed

Great topic!
- Rectal CA 4/29/99, Stage I, 90% sigmoid/15" of colon/GB removed, temporary colostomy, reversed 6-26-99
- Chronic IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's, on low residue diet
- Colace 50 mg each evening


Equestrian Mom
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Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3115
   Posted 3/8/2010 6:09 PM (GMT -7)   
Allie~any in particular?
Crohn’s dx 1989
some terrible years before my
Proctocolectomy in 2008


Allison77
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 421
   Posted 3/9/2010 11:45 AM (GMT -7)   
Colectomy, CI, subtotal (in any of it's derivative's) proctocolectomy, cholecystectomy....just to name a few...

-Allie
www.oscartheostomy.blogspot.com
-Allison
RX Crohn's 1999, over 30 surgeries, 3 strokes, permanent colostomy and rectum removal.
 
"The most unfortunate thing that happens to a person who fears failure is that he limits himself by becoming afraid to try anything new."


summerstorm
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Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 6571
   Posted 3/9/2010 2:29 PM (GMT -7)   
*raises hand* oo oo, i dont know any of the answers! LOL

i really dont know any of the technical names and you would think i would
UC for 8 years, before finally kicking its butt and having a permanent ileostomy April 17 2007! 
-I have gone to find myself, if i get back before i return, keep me here-


Equestrian Mom
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Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3115
   Posted 3/9/2010 3:54 PM (GMT -7)   
summerstorm...really?

okay, Allie, here's a start (feel free to correct if I get any wrong):

Colectomy: removal of entire colon
CI: Colonic Inertia (constipation due to weak muscles)
subtotal colectomy(in any of it's derivative's): removal of part/some of the colon
proctocolectomy: removal of colon/rectum
cholecystectomy: Gall Bladder removal

any others?
Crohn’s dx 1989
some terrible years before my
Proctocolectomy in 2008

Post Edited (OHIO76) : 3/11/2010 4:20:04 AM (GMT-7)


summerstorm
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Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 6571
   Posted 3/9/2010 5:50 PM (GMT -7)   
well i thought i knew 1, 2 and 4 but i wasnt sure, and didnt want to give her the wrong answers! but i was right, lol.
UC for 8 years, before finally kicking its butt and having a permanent ileostomy April 17 2007! 
-I have gone to find myself, if i get back before i return, keep me here-


RobinByrd
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 3/9/2010 10:29 PM (GMT -7)   

My definition of the proctocolectomy is the removal of the colon, rectum, appendix wink  and anus...but ALSO it's FREEDOM!!!!  yeah   

smurf 


: )  Robin
 
29 year old Mommy of an amazing 2 year old and Wife for 3 years!
Dx-May 2007 Moderate/Severe Pancolitis - failed all medications
Proctocolectomy w/ permanent ileostomy on 02/06/09!!!
 
"Your mind is like a parachute, it only works when it is open."  -Unknown


Allison77
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 421
   Posted 3/10/2010 1:41 PM (GMT -7)   
take down?

-Allie
www.oscartheostomy.blogspot.com
-Allison
RX Crohn's 1999, over 30 surgeries, 3 strokes, permanent colostomy and rectum removal.
 
"The most unfortunate thing that happens to a person who fears failure is that he limits himself by becoming afraid to try anything new."


suebear
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 5698
   Posted 3/10/2010 3:47 PM (GMT -7)   
Protocolectomy doesn't always include an ostomy. I had my colon and rectum removed but don't have an ostomy. This can get confusing!

Takedown is for those of us who have had either a temporary ostomy or temporary colectomy. It simply means the closure of the ostomy and the return to passing waste through the anus.

Sue
dx proctitis in 1987
dx UC in 1991, was stable until 1998

1998 started prednisone, asacol, pentasa, nortriptylene, ativan, 6MP, rowasa enemas and suppositories, hydrocortisone enemas, tried the SCD diet, being a vegetarian, omega 3s, flax, pranic healing, yoga, acupuncture, probiotics

2000 lost all my B-12 stores and became anemic

2001 opted for j-pouch surgery- now living life med-free


sammies
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 493
   Posted 3/10/2010 3:55 PM (GMT -7)   
There's a great book someone on the crohn's board rec'd. 100 Questions and Answers about Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: A Lahey Clinic Guide by Amy Barto and Andrew Warner. Somehow, a bunch of us got free copies. Does anyone remember how? Anyway, it's available on Amazon and it's a terrific, easy to understand FAQ book with a great glossary. Even though I was diagnosed 25 years ago, I found it extremely helpful and great for helping my spouse understand terms too.
24+ years with Crohn's/colitis; fistulizing crohn's; ileostomy and proctocolectomy; TPN, propranolol and xanax; anemia of chronic disease


Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 3/10/2010 5:39 PM (GMT -7)   
Good one about "takedown". Sometimes the terms we often use are medical slang nurses and doctors use.

For example, I had two drainage tubes on either side of my abdominal area, for 10 days post-op. I had to empty two attached small plastic bottles and record how much drainage I had in a 24 hour period. The nurses called these bottles - "grenades".

At my first post-op appt. my surgeon said - time to get rid of your grenades. At least I knew by then what the heck he was talking about!
- Rectal CA 4/29/99, Stage I, 90% sigmoid/15" of colon/GB removed, temporary colostomy, reversed 6-26-99
- Chronic IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's, on low residue diet
- Colace 50 mg each evening


polishdan
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 1595
   Posted 3/10/2010 8:57 PM (GMT -7)   
Heres one...peritonitis.......that's when the colectomy goes wrong and the surgery sutures leak digestive fluid into your abdomen. Then they fly you by helicopter to a big hospital for more emergency surgery. Been there and lucky to be alive.

Dan

Allison77
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 421
   Posted 3/10/2010 10:47 PM (GMT -7)   
LOL @ grenades!! I had those!!! LOL
Ok...are "reversal" and "take down" the same thing??
-Allison
RX Crohn's 1999, over 30 surgeries, 3 strokes, permanent colostomy and rectum removal.
 
"The most unfortunate thing that happens to a person who fears failure is that he limits himself by becoming afraid to try anything new."


Equestrian Mom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3115
   Posted 3/11/2010 4:18 AM (GMT -7)   
generally:

Take Down is used for a patient who is going to an internal pouch from an ileo

Reversal is used when a patient is going from ileo to regular(or adjusted) plumbing
Crohn’s dx 1989
some terrible years before my
Proctocolectomy in 2008


summerstorm
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 6571
   Posted 3/11/2010 9:41 AM (GMT -7)   
i have one too

ron=smartie pants *big grin*
UC for 8 years, before finally kicking its butt and having a permanent ileostomy April 17 2007! 
-I have gone to find myself, if i get back before i return, keep me here-


Allison77
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2005
Total Posts : 421
   Posted 3/11/2010 11:37 AM (GMT -7)   
LOL @ summerstorm!!!!!
*shakes head @ Ron...* <- insert a groan as well! LOL

-Allie (Allison77) = really, only my mum calls me Allison....
www.oscartheostomy.blogspot.com
-Allison
RX Crohn's 1999, over 30 surgeries, 3 strokes, permanent colostomy and rectum removal.
 
"The most unfortunate thing that happens to a person who fears failure is that he limits himself by becoming afraid to try anything new."


Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 3/11/2010 6:16 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey here's a question, why is an ostomy nurse referred to as an ET nurse?

I probably was told the answer long ago but I can't remember the explanation.
- Rectal CA 4/29/99, Stage I, 90% sigmoid/15" of colon/GB removed, temporary colostomy, reversed 6-26-99
- Chronic IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's, on low residue diet
- Colace 50 mg each evening


Equestrian Mom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 3115
   Posted 3/11/2010 7:34 PM (GMT -7)   
Enterostomal Therapy Nurse = a nurse that cares for stomas

but, I think they are now/or also called WOC Nurses = Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses
Crohn’s dx 1989
some terrible years before my
Proctocolectomy in 2008


NewBag
New Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 8
   Posted 3/11/2010 9:15 PM (GMT -7)   
"For example, I had two drainage tubes on either side of my abdominal area, for 10 days post-op. I had to empty two attached small plastic bottles and record how much drainage I had in a 24 hour period. The nurses called these bottles - "grenades".

At my first post-op appt. my surgeon said - time to get rid of your grenades. At least I knew by then what the heck he was talking about!"

Otherwise known as a JP or Jackson-Pratt drain.

Actually I'm glad this thread got started. I started reading this forum after my first surgery for diverticulosis wherein I woke up with a diverting colostomy and appliance which, prior to the surgery, I was told was a minor possibility. That was the first surgeon who then sends me to the colorectal/cancer superman second surgeon to finish the job, fortunately successfully.

Anyway, after reading the threads here and reading all the terms, I started asking for the terms applicable to my case. All I got from the two of them was the very scientific, "You were a mess!"

Marsky
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2007
Total Posts : 1956
   Posted 3/12/2010 5:31 AM (GMT -7)   
Newbag - lol at your superman second surgeon nickname. Picturing a GI doc walking into the operating room wearing a cape now......

After my first surgery - 5.5 hours long, 15 inches of colon + 90% of my sigmoid removed, GB taken out, temporary colostomy created - I was a mess. When I asked my surgeon what all they ended up doing to me because I went into with the "possibility of a temp ostomy" but didn't know for certain until I woke up in recovery and patted my stomach, he said.....

"You were the blue plate special yesterday!"

Got the impression there were interns watching behind the plate glass windows. Oh lovely I thought. They then paraded these interns in my room for a few days post op, someone was always lifting my gown. I had zero privacy.

And then they jump started my period, 10 days early. My surgeon said - and oh yeah you're going to start your period. I said - nuh uh, I'm not due for 10 days......he said nope, I saw your ovary.....bla bla bla.

The nurses had to use an archaeic sanitary belt and pads on me because I had so many incisions, tubes and cathedar coming out of me. LOL One young nurse looked at that belt and said - I have no idea how to use these things! I raised my hand and said - well, I do, da** it. LOL

I chuckle now at the layman terms I heard back then too. As if we'd never figure out the correct terms that applied to our situations.

Next.........
- Rectal CA 4/29/99, Stage I, 90% sigmoid/15" of colon/GB removed, temporary colostomy, reversed 6-26-99
- Chronic IBS/D symptoms, multiple bm's, on low residue diet
- Colace 50 mg each evening


pam222
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 985
   Posted 3/12/2010 5:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Even the nurses at the hospital don't know the correct terms. 99% of them refer to my ileostomy as a colostomy. I don't know why it annoys me but it does.
26 year old female
Diagnosed with unspecified UC 11/08
Asacol, Prednisone, 3 infusions of Remicade with no success
8/09 colonoscopy shows that the whole colon is affected
12/18/09 First part of J-Pouch surgery; recessed stoma
12/30/09 Second part of J-Pouch surgery too soon; fistula
1/9/10 Second Ileostomy Surgery with sparing of the J-Pouch
1/25/10 Stoma Revision Surgery and Fistula Repair
3/16/10 Going to try to go back to the J-Pouch again
Imodium (8/day), Questran (3/day), TPN 12 hours/day, IV fluids 4 hours/day


RobinByrd
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 3/12/2010 7:02 AM (GMT -7)   

Pam I would be super annoyed as well, and my thought is that if they do not use the proper vocabulary are they really compitent enough to be my nurse?

I have had two experiences from two different surgeries where nurses were extremely insensative and minimized the seriousness of my situation.  And you know what?  A small portion of my motivation to specialize in chronic illness as a licesed therapist is so that I can go back to this hospital and lobby for specialized mental health training for nurses.  I'm sure we can all agree that any time you have an emergency surgery it can be traumatic and very difficult to handle emotionally.

I did have a few extremely amazing nurses as well, and they deserve a gold star for being awesome!

smurf
: )  Robin
 
29 year old Mommy of an amazing 2 year old and Wife for 3 years!
Dx-May 2007 Moderate/Severe Pancolitis - failed all medications
Proctocolectomy w/ permanent ileostomy on 02/06/09!!!
 
"Your mind is like a parachute, it only works when it is open."  -Unknown


pam222
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2009
Total Posts : 985
   Posted 3/12/2010 7:19 AM (GMT -7)   
RobinByrd said...
Pam I would be super annoyed as well, and my thought is that if they do not use the proper vocabulary are they really compitent enough to be my nurse?

I have had two experiences from two different surgeries where nurses were extremely insensative and minimized the seriousness of my situation. And you know what? A small portion of my motivation to specialize in chronic illness as a licesed therapist is so that I can go back to this hospital and lobby for specialized mental health training for nurses. I'm sure we can all agree that any time you have an emergency surgery it can be traumatic and very difficult to handle emotionally.

I did have a few extremely amazing nurses as well, and they deserve a gold star for being awesome!
smurf


The nurses at my hospital know so little about ostomy care. They would try to help me in the early days and I was better at changing things than they were. They would give up frustrated within minutes. Most of my nurses were very nice, but some of them were very unsupportive. The youngest nurses were the nicest, while the older ones were not always very nice to me. I don't know if it's coincidence, a difference in training, or just getting burned out after years of working. I was in for so long (about 6 weeks) that I really know some of the nurses pretty well. After that long, they become a little more concerned about making sure I am ok.
I have home nurses now and one of them is always asking "did you have a bowel movement today?" and I say "I have an ostomy". He forgets every single time. It's a little annoying because if he can't even remember why he's here, how useful is he?
26 year old female
Diagnosed with unspecified UC 11/08 (symptoms for over a year before)
Asacol, Prednisone, Remicade with no success--no remission for over 2 years
8/09 colonoscopy shows that the whole colon is affected
12/18/09 First part of J-Pouch surgery; recessed stoma
12/30/09 Second part of J-Pouch surgery too soon; RV fistula
1/9/10 Second Ileostomy Surgery with sparing of the J-Pouch
1/25/10 Stoma Revision Surgery and Fistula Repair
4/10 Going to try to go back to the J-Pouch again
Imodium (8/day), Questran (3/day), TPN 12 hours/day, IV fluids 4 hours/day

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