Why do blockages happen?

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

Disneynut66
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 587
   Posted 3/6/2011 7:05 PM (GMT -6)   
Okay, I know why they happen, but I am confused as to why they happen more than before (I understand why they would happen at the stoma site).

So, the food goes to your stomach after swallowing then goes to the small intestine, then for people with colons it goes there, then the rectum and anus. So, if it still goes to the small intestine first, then why blockages now vs. when we had colons? I am obviously missing something and am very curious.

Also, do people that have the j-pouches have fewer or the same amount of blockages? And, does that last forever or after a certain amount of time they aren't a problem anymore?

I haven't had any obstructions yet, but it is really interesting and would like to be educated.

Oh, this is funny...a good friend of my mom's (a retired nurse) asked what type of surgery I had. My mom told her I had my colon removed. This woman said she was wrong, that they can't do that. I sent her an article so she could educate her friend.

suebear
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2006
Total Posts : 5698
   Posted 3/6/2011 7:17 PM (GMT -6)   
It's called scar tissue and it can happen to anyone who has had abdominal surgery. Typically, most jpouchers, experience blockages in the first year post surgery. The area is still slightly swollen from surgery and can pose a problem with some foods. However, some people generate a lot more scar tissue than others and can have chronic problems. It's recommended that you chew your food really well (something I've never been good at).

I had several partial obstructions my first year and they weren't too bad; I was able to manage them at home. The sensation is that you have to "go" but very little comes out. You feel backed up. The treatment is to cease eating; drink fluids, and walk. You will immediately know when an obstruction passes; there's this great physical release.

There are two types of obstructions, partial and full. Partial obstructions are described above. A full obstruction would include the inability to pass gas or even minute amounts of stool, combined with vomiting. For this type of obstruction you need to go to the ER immediately.

I can count on both hands how many stupid medical people, doctors included, who don't know what a jpouch is. After explaining the procedure to one doctor she asked me to show her my ostomy!!!! Needless to say she's no longer my doctor. My understanding is that the jpouch procedures take up only one measly paragraph in medical textbooks. Prepare yourself, you are going to know a lot more about this then your every day doctors and nurses!

Sue

stripey
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 1059
   Posted 3/6/2011 7:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Have to agree with Sue, it is stunning how much the medical profession don't know about illnesses. When I had to see the specialist gastro nurse to go onto Humira she asked if I had any other illnesses. I gave her my full list and said Antiphospholipid Syndrome. She looked blank so gave her the common name 'sticky blood'. She had no clue what I was on about, had to explain that it meant my blood clotted too well, you would have thought she would have some idea from the clue in the name 'sticky blood'.

I had my first blockage in 2004 which was caused by a stricture from a flare up. They operated to release it but it is obviously still there as could feel it again in this flare up. Didn't obstruct but could feel it as it got to that bit.
Crohn's dx 1989, loop ileo 1992, end ileo 1992. Arthritis developed 1990 Stoma abcess 1995. Azathioprine started 1995. Panprocolorectomy 1999. Stillbirth 2000, antiphospholipid syndrome dx 2000. Flare up 2004, stoma abcess and strictoplasty 2004. Low blood pressure dx with impaired kidney function 2006, fludrocortisone pres. flare up 2010, steroids, Humira, codeine.

Disneynut66
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 587
   Posted 3/6/2011 7:57 PM (GMT -6)   
I knew you would have the answer, Sue. That makes sense. I have been chewing well, but everytime I forget, I stress. Never had a problem, though.

When I tell people about the j-pouch, people are blown away. It is pretty incredible.

Sticky blood...I have never heard that medical term you used before, but if someone told me they have sticky blood, I would understand what they meant.
Diagnosed 2006. 1st step of 2 step j-pouch 1/3/11. 2nd step will be in April! So done with this disease.

stripey
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 1059
   Posted 3/6/2011 8:04 PM (GMT -6)   
It may be a phrase that is used in UK, the other name is Hughes Syndrome, named after Dr Hughes who discovered the blood disorder and the clinic he set up is based in London.

It never ceases to amaze me how ignorant people in the medical profession can be over well medical stuff. I'm not even on about specialist things, sometimes it is the basics. Scary really.
Crohn's dx 1989, loop ileo 1992, end ileo 1992. Arthritis developed 1990 Stoma abcess 1995. Azathioprine started 1995. Panprocolorectomy 1999. Stillbirth 2000, antiphospholipid syndrome dx 2000. Flare up 2004, stoma abcess and strictoplasty 2004. Low blood pressure dx with impaired kidney function 2006, fludrocortisone pres. flare up 2010, steroids, Humira, codeine.

Disneynut66
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 587
   Posted 3/6/2011 8:31 PM (GMT -6)   
To me the ones who don't want to admit they don't know are even worse. My GI was like that which caused me to overdose on 6MP. I do have to thank him, though, because ending up in the hospital and all the bad things the drugs he prescribed made me decide to get the surgery over with.

My GP sometimes doesn't know the answer, but he tells us, researches it and takes care of it. I appreciate that he won't make decisions on our health care without being certain of what he is doing. I understand that they can't know everything being a GP...but please don't fake it!
Diagnosed 2006. 1st step of 2 step j-pouch 1/3/11. 2nd step will be in April! So done with this disease.

J's Mom
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 109
   Posted 3/6/2011 9:18 PM (GMT -6)   
I wonder if J has partial obstructions sometimes. He has such a high tolerance for pain and doesn't communicate if he is uncomfortable. We can tell if he is not feeling well, but not sure about mild discomfort. For example, today I did not need to empty his pouch for the first time until around 7pm and it was VERY thick. I did have to vent if several times during the day or I would have been extremely worried. He had a complete obstruction 6 mos after his colectomy requiring emergent surgery so I know what that is like. I make sure that he always has his sippie cup available so he gets plenty of fluids. He does communicate when he is hungry and has been telling me all afternoon "Eat Mommy eat". My question is does the feeling you get make you possibly feel like you could be hungry?
22 year old developmentally delayed son with ileo since 2008
Dx'd with UC 2007

Scrap Girl
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 653
   Posted 3/6/2011 11:05 PM (GMT -6)   
I only had two during the nine months I had my illieostomy but I definitely didn't feel hungry. They were both pretty painful. Both blockages woke me up in the middle of the night. Plus, I had gas trapped inside me with no place to go so that made it even more painful. I wasn't interested in eating because the only thing I could think about was alleviating the blockage anyway I could. Thankfully, after about four or five hours both blockages passed. Not fun.

summerstorm
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2006
Total Posts : 6571
   Posted 3/6/2011 11:53 PM (GMT -6)   
I had one partial one and I didn't feel hungry! I just felt bad. I didn't even know that was what it was I didn't have much output but had taken some immodium and didn't expect to but had a stomach ache however I was also drinking but as soon as I hit the hot tub andthe warm water got my stomach I got out and threw up a lot! And it had been like 4 or 5 hours since I had eaten and it was pieces of food which I knew meant it wasn't able to go down! After that I felt a little better then sometime in the midle of the night I woke up with a really full bag!
UC for 8 years, before finally kicking its butt and having a permanent ileostomy April 17 2007!
-I have gone to find myself, if i get back before i return, keep me here-
No matter what kind of day you are having, take five minutes to sing loudly and dance like a fool!

J's Mom
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 109
   Posted 3/7/2011 6:33 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks, guess he was having a low output, hungry day :-) Just makes it very difficult since he can't tell me, it is always a guessing game and sometimes I get a little nervous.
22 year old developmentally delayed son with ileo since 2008
Dx'd with UC 2007

betsaronie
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2007
Total Posts : 318
   Posted 3/8/2011 10:21 PM (GMT -6)   
I just actually talked to my future WOCN nurse about this. She explained that blockages are more common for ostomies because the the intestines being taken through the inflexible layers of muscle and tissue to come out of the abdominal wall. our insides all all squishy so things pass along nice and tidy, but when the food has to pass through a narrow tube that is surrounding by firm tissue it's more likely to get stuck. Also they are more common for ileos than colostomies because of the size of the ostomy itself. But she told me that, like sue said, after the healing is done for a j-pouch they are less common because once again the intestines are surrounded by squishiness that eases the flow of food. that and scar tissue obviously is still an issue for everyone. :)
-diagnosed with UC Dec 2006 at 22
-allergic or intolerant to all 5ASAs, sulfa and 6-mp
-emergency transverse colostomy on 9/13/10 from perforated colon
-J-pouch surgery scheduled 3/21/11

Disneynut66
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 587
   Posted 3/8/2011 10:52 PM (GMT -6)   
I wondered if moving the small intestines around had something to do with it. Great info. Thanks.
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Saturday, September 22, 2018 1:56 AM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 3,005,630 posts in 329,243 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 161787 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, melzissa.
235 Guest(s), 3 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
bluelyme, JoHnGaMeR90, Alex ArmPain