Need advice for operating room and recovery

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BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/7/2008 2:21 AM (GMT -6)   
I will have open prostate surgery next week. I am more than a bit nervous about the whole operating room experience, and wonder if anyone can offer words of advice for getting through the operation and the first day or two afterwards. Just need to know what to expect and how to deal with such things as staying calm before "going under the knife", handling pain and getting to know my new anatomy when I wake up without freaking out. Thanks in advance for sharing your experiences.
 
Bill in SD

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 9/7/2008 4:58 AM (GMT -6)   
I'm a fairly calm guy so its hard to tell you how to deal with the "nerves" issue before surgey...Expect maybe you can think about being taken care of by highly skilled/trained professionals.
 
The first day or two after surgery will be the worst of course and It'll start getting better with each day after...
 
The biggest issue I had with the whole deal was not knowing about the OVERWHELMING Urge feeling of wanting to go pee-pee turn   The morphine while in the hospital and the anti spasam meds will help with this urge feeling.
 
You're "new anatomy" will be more like the lack there of anatomy. Not much to get used to except the catheter...Had mine in for five weeks and it didn't really bother me that much.
 
Good luck to you.
Age 53   - 5'11'   205lbs
Overall Heath Condition - Good
PSA - July 07 & Jan 08 -> 1.3
Gleason - 6
(biopsy done March 4, 2008-> 2 of 12)
 
06/25/08 - Da Vinci robotic laparoscopy


mvesr
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 823
   Posted 9/7/2008 6:34 AM (GMT -6)   

Hi Bill

While you are bding prepped for surgery, shaving and what not, putting the IV in, you will get a shot that will help you relax.  I had an epidural in addition to the other things they did and it made a real difference for me.  This was not my first surgery, broken foot and gall bladder before but it was my least stressful.  Talk to the nurses around you and they will help you through it.  Really, this surgery will be a breeze, mine was.  Just get up and walk around when you can, it will help you get out of the hospital sooner.  As far as the catheter is concerned, you will have to get your mind right to deal with that thing.  Just remember it is necessary for things inside to heal so you can get back to your old self.  Take care and let us know how you do with the surgery.

 

Mika

 


age at dx 54 now 56
psa at dx 4.3
got the bad news 1/29/07
open surgery Duke Medical Center 5-29-07
never more than 2 pads
Tossed the pads this spring
ED still a problem
first year PSA less than zero
 


Navy corpsman
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 61
   Posted 9/7/2008 7:01 AM (GMT -6)   

Bill -

The best advice I can give you is that the hard part is already over.  Nothing that will happen over the next several weeks will compare to being told that you have cancer.  The future won't be a cake walk, but it won't be that difficult either.  If you keep things in their proper perspective there is no need to be anxious about anything.

The people in the o.r. are all professionals and have done their job many times before you.  If you get really wound up before the operation they will give you medicine to help you stay calm.  When I get nervous I focus on my breathing, making sure that my exhale is longer than my inhale.  As far as the pain goes, I would not worry about it at all.  With the medicine they give, you won't feel a thing.  They even gave me medicine to take home and I didn't use it all.  The catheter wasn't that big a deal, it just took a little getting used to.  After a couple of days with my catheter I started liking the idea of not having to take a leak as often as I used to.  One thing that suprised me was my recovery time.  There is a lot of talk about quick recoveries and I think it is misleading.  I took about a month before I started too feel normal again, but everybody is different.  When you get home from the hospital, try to walk as much as possible without over doing it.

My cancer journey has had a positive effect on my life.  I appreciate and enjoy life much more. 

Stay in touch.

- John


Age:  44
We have a family history of PCa.  My Dad and uncle died from it at 65 and 53. My PSA velocity increased in the last 2 years and I had to talk my GP into refering me to a urologist.
Biopsy results:  5 of 11 cores positive, all 30%. Gleason 6. T1c. PSA 2.53  Date of biopsy 15MAY08.
Open RRP at Johns Hopkins with Dr. Partin on 09JUL08.
Pathology report:  Gleason 6, pT2, neg. margins, 0 lymph node and seminal vessical, organ confined, I lost 1 nerve bundle and 22 lymph nodes.
As of today, about a month after surgery, I feel at about 80%. Urinary control seems to be improving. Little Elvis has taken a nap and has not awakened yet. I hope when he wakes up he is well rested because he is going to get one heck of a workout.
 
 


Tony1951
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 50
   Posted 9/7/2008 8:00 AM (GMT -6)   
I have a question about surgery as well.  Has anyone here went through the surgery with an epidural instead of a general anesthesia?

Dirtmover
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 158
   Posted 9/7/2008 9:14 AM (GMT -6)   
hey there  bill , navys got it pretty right , you will hear alot of negative stories before and needlessly,NO ONE is more worrisome than i . i . have a type a prersonality and before this had never had a surgery of  any kind, I WAS TERREIFIED and you know what ? it was nothing like i had thought , it was uncomfortable , but far  from un bearable.you will feel the need to go pee for a couple of daysand alot of guys whined about the cath ,for me BULLcrap wasnt bad at all, you get used to it quick,same thing with cath removal you dont hardley feel it , it does feel weird tho.same with  the j.p. drain , the only  thing i dissaggree with navy about (AND IM CERTAIN THIS BECAUSE EVERYONE HEALS DIFFRENT LY  HOWEVER WE ARE VERY CLOSE IN AGE) is the recovery
it was pretty quick , you do have to walk and take it easy to a degree tho, i went back to work at 3 weeks and back on my bike at 6 by 10 i was dry the only thing that really hung on was the perrenial discomfort it lasted about 6 weeks ti wasnt pain ful  just un comfy think about it .this is major surgery and you up and about in 3-4 weeks thats fast pal i wish you luck my brother one more thing, the out comes you have and the rate you heal in my opinion IS DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE SKILL OF THE SURGEON and your physical health there is a huge diffrence in the skill of docs ive come to find out  with the resarch ive done, get the best  you got 1 shot , i did and am thrilled with my choice of treatment....................dirt
Diagnosed November 2007   (43 years old )
PSA 3.9 / Gleason 6 / TC1 6 cores 1 shows 25%
Sugery scheduled 5/29/08 - City of Hope - Dr. Mark Kawachi
 "First show of the day"
 and now for the new ive been waiting for
 FINAL PATH REPORT:gleason upgraded to 3+4 T2c bilateral disease,tumor involvment 5%
extra prostatic extention:absent
seminal vesical invasion :absent
pathological staging:pTNM pT2 ORGAN CONFINED
margins free of carcinoma
usable erections ;6-6-08 with little blue pill
continence; 1 pad a day, dry at night


kcragman
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 240
   Posted 9/7/2008 2:42 PM (GMT -6)   
BillSD:

I've had 3 surgeries - knee, shoulder, and robotic laparoscopy. You will be fine for the actual procedure. The staff will do everything they possibly can to make you feel as comfortable as possible. I don't like the IV's, which generally go in the back of your hand. But they can pump all kinds of good things into you once an IV is in place. For my knee surgery, when they started the IV they told me I might feel a little nauseous, which I did, and they just flipped a switch and almost instantaneously I was not nauseous.

You will sleep right through the procedure and never know it happened. The most shocking time is when you wake up - you might have all kinds of things sticking out of you and you might be a little uncomfortable - BUT - at the hospitals I have been in they are very concerned that you do not feel any pain. For my robotic job I must have had every doctor, intern, nurse, candy striper, and even the guy swabbing the deck ask me if I was in pain - because they do not want you to be in pain.

You just have to really focus on the fact that every minute, every hour, and every day your body is healing, healing, healing. The first few minutes, or hours, or maybe even days might not be most fun you've ever had - but you will be getting better every day. Just hang in, hang in, hang in.

Finally - the great thing about your PCa surgery is that you DON'T have to go through physical therapy rehab. My knee rehab was brutal, but the shoulder, the shoulder, my god - the shoulder... I still wake up shaking at nights saying, "They can't hurt me anymore." On the other hand, I now have 100% range of motion in my previously honked up shoulder and I'm a pretty happy camper.

TRY to relax, and best of luck to you...
kcragman
Age: 52
March 2006: PSA 2.5

Dec 2007: PSA taken for insurance application. I did not see the results until late Jan '08 - after I was rejected. Their lab said PSA 4.5. PSA again in Feb '08: 3.7.

March 2008: Biopsy. Gleason 7 (4+3) 12 cores taken. 5 on the left side were cancerous and the 6th did not look good.

May 5, 2008: Da Vinci robotic laparoscopy at GW Hospital, Washington DC.

Post op: Gleason 9 (4+5). 15% of prostate involved. Stage: pT3a. Negative margins. Lymph nodes and associated glands all appear to be cancer free.

July 2008: PSA at 7 weeks was undetectable.
August 2008: PSA at 14 weeks (3 months) was undetectable.


beachbum50
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2007
Total Posts : 292
   Posted 9/7/2008 2:59 PM (GMT -6)   

Billsd,

 I was worried but found out it's not that bad at all! The worst for me was the wonderful Fleet treatment the night before, then they also gave me a enema with some sort of antibiotic that I had to hold for 30 long min., but the "sweet" Nurse told me she had warmed it up for me! They wheeled me into the operating room and I helped move me onto the operating table, with the robot above me and then it was lights out! I don't remember much about the recovery room, and was awake when I got back to my room, no real pain, just sore like you did 10,000 sit-ups. I walked out less than 24 hours after the operation, and had no problems walking up steps. Just take it slow and easy, and watch the hanging tube so it does not catch on anything! Soon you will join us on the other side!

Beachbum wink


Beachbum
 
PSA 10 June 2007
Biopsy July 2, 15 of 16 samples positive
T2C
3+3=6
prostate weighed 40 grams
Di Vinci 10/09/07, four hours on table, 3 in recovery
Total time in Hospital: 29 hours
Record for Dr. Lance, 70% of prostate had cancer, but NO spread, clean margins,Clean nodes,
First PSA at 5 weeks, UNDETECTABLE!
Catheter out at seven days, dry from hour one!
Second PSA 19 weeks post op, UNDETECTABLE 2/11/2008
Third PSA 5/12/08, six months post op, UNDETECTABLE
Fourth PSA 8/21/08, nine months post op, UNDETECTABLE
The Lord has truly Blessed me.


BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/7/2008 3:13 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks to all of you for these responses. They give me comfort and reassurance that I will be able to handle it. Would love to hear from others. That's the best thing about this forum: great support from everyone. I really am feeling better about it, and looking forward to getting on with the recovery.

Gratefully,
Bill in San Diego

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 9/7/2008 3:24 PM (GMT -6)   
Bill,
I wish you the very best this week. I know you'll do fine. We'll see you on the "other side". My experience was completely normal. All went well surgically. I recommend light walking, increasing it daily. But don't strain too much while you have that catheter hanging around.

Tony
Age 46 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8
Surgery on Feb 16, 2007 @ The City of Hope
Post-Op Pathology: Gleason 4+3=7, positive margins, Stage pT3b (Stage III)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 9 '08): <0.1
I will continue HT until May '09. 
Years in Remission (3/23/07): 1
Visit my Journey at:
And at:
 
STAY POSITIVE!
 
 


livinadream
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1382
   Posted 9/7/2008 3:55 PM (GMT -6)   
Bill what type of surgery are you having? is it radical or DaVinci? You might have posted that and I did not read it. Like everyone else has said the first day or so will be the worst, but life on the other side knowing that the cancer has been removed will be comforting. Take it easy and just relax. Get a good book, something positive and maybe this will be the beginning of new chapter in life, one that gives you the ability to see the beauty that is all around us yet we so easily overlook because we get so caught up in the pressures of life.
Please stay in contact we would love to hear more about your journey.

peace and love
Dale
My PSA at diagnosis was 16.3
age 46 (current)
My gleason score from prostate was 4+5=9 and from the lymph nodes was 4+4=8
I had 44 IMRT's
Casodex
Currently on Lupron
I go to The Cancer Treatment Center of America
Married with two kids
latest PSA 5-27-08 0.11
PSA July 24th, 2008 is 0.04
cancer in 4 of 6 cores
92%
80%
37%
28%
 


BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/7/2008 5:00 PM (GMT -6)   
Dale,

Thnaks for the follow up. It is open retropubic rdical prostatectomy (hope I got that right). It is non-lap and non-robotic, becuase of the concern I might not have a clear margin. Other than that, I think things look good.

Here is my story:

------------------------------------------------

April 2008 (Age 59 at diagnosis, discovered in UTI treatment)
Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test:
PSA 4.4
DRE palpable tumor
May 15, 2008 – Biopsy
Pathology: 10 of 15 cores had cancer.
Right lobe (2 of 5 cores 40%) Gleason 3+3
Left lobe (3 of 5 cores 10%) Gleason 3+3
Right lesion (5 of 5 cores 100%) Gleason 3+3
Right base lesion (100%) Gleason 3+3
Right seminal vesical (ambiguous results - possible nerve involvement "lesion too small for grading")
Composite Gleason score 3+3=6
Bone scan and pelvic/abdomen CT show no visible metastasis
Began weight loss program (lost 28 pounds so far between diagnosis and surgery)
June 15, 2008 – Began two months hormone therapy (Casodex 50 mg)
July 1, 2008 – Trelstar HT shot (3 month dose)
July 11, 2008 – EKG, OK
July 16, 2008 – Echo-cardiogram, OK
Aug 25, 2008 – Donated first unit of my own plasma for surgery
Sept 3, 2008 – Stress test OK, and donated second unit of plasma
Sept 5, 2008 – Pre-op visits with Urologist and GP,
Sept 10, 2008 - Hospital Pre-Op Visit, chest X-ray, EKG
Sept 15, 2008 – open Radical Prostatectomy (Non-laproscopic, non-robotic)

Thanks,

Billl in San Diego

livinadream
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1382
   Posted 9/7/2008 5:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Yep that makes sense and that is the exact surgery I had. I am assuming you will have a lymph node disection during the surgery? If so there will be a little more abdominal pain, and actually I had some internal bleeding due to the removal of the nodes, but it was a non issue in the long run. My worst pain was when I woke up and the first couple of days at home. Once I got up and about I was ok. Just take your time and do not try to be a super hero for the next few weeks allow others to do for you.
If you would like please email me and we can chat.
Any questions you may have feel free to ask.

peace to you
Dale
My PSA at diagnosis was 16.3
age 46 (current)
My gleason score from prostate was 4+5=9 and from the lymph nodes was 4+4=8
I had 44 IMRT's
Casodex
Currently on Lupron
I go to The Cancer Treatment Center of America
Married with two kids
latest PSA 5-27-08 0.11
PSA July 24th, 2008 is 0.04
cancer in 4 of 6 cores
92%
80%
37%
28%
 


Ken S
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 120
   Posted 9/7/2008 6:29 PM (GMT -6)   
Bill,

The anticipation is the worst part. I can only tell you how my Pre-Op experience was up to a point. The staff was fantastic and they really do make you feel at ease. I was fascinated by the process and I was asking all kinds of questions. Before they wheeled me into the O.R. the last question I remember asking was "Now what is this shot for?" and being told "In 20 seconds you're not going to remember a thing that happens". I was still awake, my wife walked with us as far as she could and said I was still asking questions and the attendant turned to her and said he's not going to remember any of this. Sure enough I don't.

I had the retro-pubic and had very little pain during recovery. Having a bowel movement while the catheter was still in caused a little discomfort and the staples were itchy after a while but for the most part it was uneventful.

Bill, I'm sure you'll do fine.

Ken
Age 54 (2006)
PSA: 2005 - 3.2, 2006 - 3.7
Biopsy 8/06, Gleason 6 (3+3), T1c
Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy 11/3/06
Memorial Hospital, Pawtucket, RI
Post-Op Biopsy, still Gleason 6 (3+3),
T2c, right apical margin positive
CT Scan 1/07, tumor discovered on right
kidney (unrelated to PCa)
Partial Nephrectomy 3/9/07
R.I. Hospital, Providence, RI
IMRT (37 Treatments) 4/23/07 - 6/14/07
PSA: 7/08 - 0.02


BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/7/2008 8:30 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks again everyone for responding. This is an amazing way to get support from folks who have already been through what I will be experiencing.

Dale, yes they will take some lymph nodes, so thanks for the heads up that I can expect a bit more discomoprt from that.

I started a blog mostly for self therapy. You are all welcome to check in, especially the daily update link where I post what's happening and how I'm feeling.

http://www.williamjenkinsjournal.blogspot.com

I have enjoyed visiting the websites and blogs posted by other forum members.

And I am praying for each one of you!

Thanks,
Bill in San Diego

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 9/7/2008 9:22 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi Bill,

If you want, you can cut and paste the link below into your signature, and your site will show after every post you do.

Bill's Journal

God Bless!
 
Tony
 
Age 46 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8
Surgery on Feb 16, 2007 @ The City of Hope
Post-Op Pathology: Gleason 4+3=7, positive margins, Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE)
Bilateral seminal vesicle invasion (SVI); Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 9 '08): <0.1 ~ Undetectable!
 
You can visit my Journey at:
 
STAY POSITIVE!
 
 


Paul in Pa
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 23
   Posted 9/8/2008 9:39 AM (GMT -6)   
Bill,
I had a similar procedure to yours in July of this year. Had much the same fears as you, with the added irony that I am an anesthesiologist. I was totally freaked that I'd make a fool of myself, esp since we all either know or know of each other. Any way most of us are a compassionate bunch; I told my anesthesia team when they were done interviewing me that I was very nervous and I'd like to be as sedated as possible when leaving for the OR cause I'd be mortified if I lost it; they were very accommodating. Try to say this to the attending anesthesiologist; there are often trainees helping too and they may not be as comfortable in starting the sedation ahead of time. As in most things in life humor goes a long way to helping you deal with stuff. Good luck. If they offer you nerve blocks for post op pain I'd go for it--really helped me feel comfortable post op.
Paul

RBinCountry
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 270
   Posted 9/8/2008 12:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Concentrate on the fact that many have gone before you very successfully. The people dealing with your case know exactly what they are doing. Also, just the idea of getting it overwith was strongly on my mind - I was anxious! The last thing I remember was that I was talking with one of the nurses and then woke-up wondering when they were going to operate, and it was over. You will be amazed at how easy it goes!


Age 61
Original data - pre-operation
PSA: 5.1
T1C clinical diagnosis, Needle biopsy - 10 cores, Gleason 7 = 3+4 in 1 core (40%), 7 cores Gleason 6 = 3+3 ranging from 5% to 12%
All scans negative
Lupron administered 4/9/2008 for 4 months (with idea I would undergo external beam radiation followed by seed implants - then I changed my mind).
Robotic DiVinci surgery - Dr. Fagin (Austin) May 19th
Post operative - pathology
pT2c NX MX
Gleason 3+4
Margins - negative
Extraprostatic extension - negative
seminal vesicle invasion - uninvolved
1st Post PSA .04

BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/8/2008 12:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks TC, Paul and RB.

Paul. special thanks on the advice coming from an anesthesiologist! I will make sure my team knows that I want it the same way you did...start early and give me plenty for post-op until I get my equilibrium.

Bless you, all

Bill in SD

anglophile
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 82
   Posted 9/8/2008 6:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Bill,

I read your post a few minutes after I got the results of my 5 month PSA: >.01 (non-detectable).

I had robotic surgery, so I'm sure my recovery will be a little different from yours. I can hit the highlights for you, from own experience.

I was not nervous going into surgery. I wanted the cancer out of me. They gave me something before I went into the operating room and I don't remember anything after I was rolled in. My doctor told me later the stuff they gave me erases your memory, so I was awake and talking when they rolled me in, I just don't remember it.

I was quite surprised when I woke up regarding a number of things: I wasn't in a lot of pain (they gave me good drugs) and the catheter didn't hurt (maybe good drugs again). I was also surprised by the blood in my urine (in the bag at the foot of my bed) and the blood in the little drain thing they had in my stomach.

The hardest thing for me in the hospital was to pass gas and have a bowel movement. For some reason they want you to do that because they won't send you home if you don't (at least that's what they told me). I sort of passed gas and lied about having a bowel movement so I could go home after two nights in the hospital (they kept me until I did -- or said I did).

When I got home, I wasn't all that uncomfortable. I actually enjoyed having the catheter so I could pee and completely empty my bladder, which I hadn't been able to do prior (enlarged prostate). I also enjoyed sleeping through the night without having to get up once or twice to go.

The catheter kept moving around where it entered my urinary tract (if you get my drift) so I finally ended up using surgical tape to tape it even more than where it was on the belt around my leg. That kept it from moving and I felt a lot better. I put Neosporin on the part that moved in and out, according to my doctor's instructions.

The very hardest thing for me was having a bowel movement. My doctor had me on stool softeners and suppositories and that combination was the only thing that produced the desired effect for almost two weeks.

To tell you the truth, I was most worried about a clot breaking loose from my leg after surgery and was very aware of the warning signs. I thought it happened and I called 911 and was rushed to the hospital. It turned out to be my hiatal hernia that was soo painful I had chest pains (it mimics a heart attack).

I had the catheter in for two weeks because the doctor had to cut more of my bladder out than he expected, because my prostate had grown so large and pushed against the bladder and he want to make sure he had clear margins (which he did). When it came out, I had no control and went through four or five pads in a day.

Practice your kegals before and after the operation. It's the only way you can learn to control your bladder. I had been practicing for several months before I went into the operating room. As a result, I think, I was able to cut down on the pads. It was a relief when I finally didn't have to change a pad at work.

Speaking of work, I tried to work from home full time a week after the operation and that was too much. I ended up working part-time for three weeks, I think before I went to full time and went back to office in 5 weeks.

Make sure you buy pads and have them at home when you come home from the hospital. I bought mine over the internet by the case, so I had plenty. I wear boxers and the pads don't work well with them so I also bought some mesh briefs that hug my body and keep the pads nice and snug against me. I was very self conscious about changing them and wearing them for about a month and then had to go to an awards banquet in a suit and worried the whole way though. I didn't leak and that gave me a tremendous boost of confidence.

Now, I wear a pad during the day and nothing at night. I hardly leak at all during the day now. about four days ago I just started sleeping through the whole night, without having to get up to empty my bladder. I learned a lot from my "penis coach" -- the bio-feedback coach who helped me learn to control the muscles to control my urination.

Recently, I resumed strenuous physical exercise in a sport I do and that gave me confidence as well.

Those first few months are tough, but not as hard as I thought they'd be.

Good luck with your surgery.
Age 59 - diagnosed in Jan. 08 after biopsy
da Vinci Robotic Prostatectomy 4/11/08 - both nerves spared
Catheter removed 4/25/08
Prostate Pathology:
Gleason Grade 6 (3+3)
5 wks post-op Continence: 1 pad night, 2 during day
7 wks post-op Continence: 2 pads every 24 hours
First post-op PSA at 7 wks: 0.1
14 wks post-op Continence: 1 pad days, no pad nights
]Post-Op PSA at 5 months: 0.1


BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/9/2008 8:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks anglophile,

That's very helpful. I am squeemish, and hope they do something to conceal the urine and drain bags after surgery. But if I have to look at them, guess I will get used to it. Had bllood in the urine of course after biopsy, which in a way prepared me for what is ahead.

Really appreciate your saying you were ready to go, because you wanted the cancer out of your body. That's what I need to focus on and the attitude I need going in.

Great post, and I hope it helps others who are a bit tense before surgery as I am.

Bless you,

Bill in San Diego

Mavica
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 407
   Posted 9/10/2008 8:20 AM (GMT -6)   
Though I probably have not posted responses to more than a couple of forum discussions I do read everything and I don't think I'm alone in "lurking" here.  My prostate removal surgery is scheduled for 12 Noon (CDT) today at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago and I'm surprisingly calm - due, probably, to all of the excellent first-person reporting provided here.  The surgery will be via the da Vinci method. Thanks to everyone who contrilbutes.


Age:  58 (59 in mid-August, '08

April '08 PSA 4.8 ("free PSA" 7.9), up from 3.5 year prior

June '08 had biopsy, 2 days later told results positive but in less than 1% of sample

Gleason's 3+3=6

Developed sepsis 2 days post-biopsy, seriously ill in hospital for 3 days

Dr. recommended robotic removal using da Vinci

Surgery scheduled for mid-September, '08

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL

Dr. Robert Nadler, Urologist/Surgeon

 


BillSD
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 143
   Posted 9/10/2008 4:34 PM (GMT -6)   
Mavica

I know everything has gone well, and I am offering a prayer for your fast and complete recovery with as little discomfort as possible.

Let us know how you are doing,

Bill in SD

anglophile
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 82
   Posted 9/10/2008 6:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Just to clarify something I said in my previous post (7th graph). I taped the catheter tube to my leg -- not my penis. I didn't want to give people the wrong impression cause that would really hurt taking the tape off. The Foley catheter I had went to a Velcro thing that held it on my thigh but above that, the tube was "free" to move around as I walked and I found that uncomfortable as it moved in and out slightly. That's why I taped it so it would stay in one place. I said "surgical tape" but it was actually some hospital tape they gave me that was more like scotch tape but wider and kind of milky looking.
Age 59 - diagnosed in Jan. 08 after biopsy
da Vinci Robotic Prostatectomy 4/11/08 - both nerves spared
Catheter removed 4/25/08
Prostate Pathology:
Gleason Grade 6 (3+3)
5 wks post-op Continence: 1 pad night, 2 during day
7 wks post-op Continence: 2 pads every 24 hours
First post-op PSA at 7 wks: 0.1
14 wks post-op Continence: 1 pad days, no pad nights
Post-Op PSA at 5 months: 0.1


hopemylove
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 65
   Posted 9/10/2008 7:23 PM (GMT -6)   

Bill,

I have had a few surgeries in the past and one thing that really helps me with the time before surgery is to concentrate on moving my blood away from the surgical site. I visualize moving the blood to my extremeties--my toes and my fingers. I have found this keeps me from concentrating on the surgery itself. I have also found that my surgeons have been surprised with how little blood loss I experience during the surgeries. I don't know if it really help physically, but mentally, it keeps me busy while I wait entry to the OR.

My thoughts are with you in the coming weeks.

Karen eyes


Karen--New York
Husbands Info:
Age of diagnosis--62
2/28/08--PSA 279   DRE--positive/rock hard
Flomax and Casadex started
Biopsy--3/7/08--187cc--Gleason 10--12 of 12 positive--Perineural and LV invasion identified
T4 bone met.--hydroureteronephrosis/right kidney
3/28/08--Lupron Inj. started
4/7/08--Zometa IV started
5/15/08--PSA 12
5/20/08--Tubes placed in kidneys (through back)
5/21/08--diagnosed Neuro Endocrine Prostate carcinoma
5/28-30/08--1st round Chemo
6/18-20/08--2nd round Chemo
7/2/08--blood clot--Coumadin started
7/10/08--Stop chemo--cancer not responding
7/20-24--hospitalized for some type of seizure
7/24--New chemo given-no response
8/20/08--Start Hospice
 
 
 

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