Benefits of vacuum pumps

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DanmanBob
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 467
   Posted 12/29/2008 3:35 PM (GMT -7)   
Based upon my personal experience and from conferring with other patients and my urologist, some of the benefits that I believe come from using vacuum pumps are:
 
1. Therapy for penile tissues (this assumes ED is present)
2. Increasing blood flow in the pelvic area, which may help some with incontinence (Viagra may help some here, as well, for the same reason)
 
I know of a man who suffered from post-surgery ED, did not use a pump and had a penile implant.  Due to some issues that I will not go into here, he had the implant redone a few months later.  The second time around he used a pump for 2 months.  His result the second time yielded 1.5 more inches in length than he got the first time an implant was done.
 
Just some general info, for those considering a pump.
Danman Bob, Born 1951
Nerve-sparing, open prostate surgery November 13, 2007
Gleason 9, PSA 14; Biopsy result - 9 of 12 sticks showed cancer
Post-op pathology results - cancer confined to the prostate
100 MG Viagra 3 times a week beginning December 2007
Osbon Erec-Aid Esteem manual pump for therapy beginning mid-February 2008
30 MG papaverine/1 MG phentolamine bimix injections beginning late April 2008
Five week post-op PSA 0.2, five month post-op PSA 0.1, nine month PSA 0.1, 13 month PSA 0.4 (recurrence was likely due to very high Gleason, even though margins were deemed clear after surgery)
Radiation using Calypso Localization System to begin in January 2009


zufus
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3149
   Posted 12/30/2008 6:46 PM (GMT -7)   
Danman-Bob interested in knowing about this radiation, is this IMRT with photon rays and what else can you tell (me) us. Just asking for knowledge, I already did my version of radiation and went pretty well, no complaints. I presume we are radiating the outside of where the gland was, and maybe some other key pelvic related areas, maybe you can expound on the whole salvage protocol??? It may be a great choice, salvage therapies can be effective, they come without guarantees as does about everything with PCa, not meaning to diminish your choice just the way it is with therapies. We also have to make some tough decisions on our own behalf, we walk the walk not someone else.

Neutrondbob (about the same age) our stats are not to far apart also, I decided on different path, its been 6+ years for me thus far and went pretty well, considering my higher stats, I knew curative was a complete gamble no matter what choices I took, I am not finished fighting either and actually still have chances of beating this or lasting a decade or more. New stuff is coming, somebody is going to become wealthy with a patent on something the incentives are there.

DanmanBob
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 467
   Posted 12/30/2008 7:29 PM (GMT -7)   

Yes, IMRT.

The primary difference is that transponders are inserted (this afternoon in my case) that allow more precise determination of where to direct the radiation beams.  The radiation itself is not different from traditional IMRT.  This just provides another way to help minimize the likelihood of misfiring and causing harm to the bladder, rectum, etc.


Danman Bob, Born 1951
Nerve-sparing, open prostate surgery November 13, 2007
Gleason 9, PSA 14; Biopsy result - 9 of 12 sticks showed cancer
Post-op pathology results - cancer confined to the prostate
100 MG Viagra 3 times a week beginning December 2007
Osbon Erec-Aid Esteem manual pump for therapy beginning mid-February 2008
30 MG papaverine/1 MG phentolamine bimix injections beginning late April 2008
Five week post-op PSA 0.2, five month post-op PSA 0.1, nine month PSA 0.1, 13 month PSA 0.4 (recurrence was likely due to very high Gleason, even though margins were deemed clear after surgery)
Radiation using Calypso Localization System to begin in January 2009


zufus
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 3149
   Posted 12/31/2008 4:03 AM (GMT -7)   
I have heard of such before didn't know the term Calypso I guess, been awhile since looking at all the various forms of radiations. And for others there are alot of variations in types, delivery, rays and technologies for radiations, and it could make large differences (liekly). Most importantly is the skills also of the rad-onco-doc who performs such, experience is important, usually if there is a horror story of problems on a patient it was the mis-skill level i.e. an old one is this for 'brachy' seeding, a doc actually put brachy into seminal vessicals instead of prostate (how skillful is that???- it lead to problems too). He might have been one of those docs that go to these basically seminar schools learns the 'brachy' basics and is allowed to hang his shingle out that he can perform this protocol, I have read this story at www.prostate-help.org in the past.
So, the caveat is find out how experienced is your doc on any proceedure, have a reputation, board certified maybe, years in the field of expertise, etc. Not to say anybody necessarily chose a bad doctor, but such can exist and we as laypersons don't really know totally what goes on in the background and business world side of these things (usually). We can try to find out and ask around, research internet and background training etc. to some degree.

As for old EBRT radiation technology, it is out dated, likely the patient would have collateral damage it appears from others testimonials. Ask what type of equipment, machinery is used, type of rays, number of sessions, targeting methods (Tomo-etc.), expected side effects and durations. Most of the industry is using IMRT machines and proton or photon rays, these days. Some places (rarer) using IMRT & Cyclotron to deliver combo neutron & photon rays. Neutron ray is the most powerful ray used, but requires careful skill and dosemetrics. It is not used by itself in PCa, that I know of, usually in combo with IMRT. Proton rays are next in the powerful gammit and there are some excellent centers using such, the machinery costs a fortune as does the Cyclotron, that is why they are not everywhere at this time. Not that IMRT machines are cheap, but alot cheaper.

Neutrondbob-zufus
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