How many had a PAP test before Dr recommended a treatment.

How many had a PAP test before choosing a treatment
2
Dr didn't give a PAP test - 33.3%
4
Don't know what a PAP test is - 66.7%
0
Dr gave a PAP test and discussed results - 0.0%

 
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4188
   Posted 4/17/2009 6:44 PM (GMT -6)   
I have stated many times that I feel that most people don't have their cancer properly staged before choosing a treatment.
A simple PAP test is a useful tool in staging your cancer. It's a simple blood test.
If PAP is greater than 3.0 ng/ml the chance of psa reoccurrance after radical surgery is 61%. If less than 3.0 reoccurance was less than 21% without regard to psa level before treatment.
 
Dattoli found that PAP was the strongest predictor of biochemical failure with IMRT and seeds.
 
How many of your doctors gave you a simple PAP test before recommending a treatment and discussed the results and their meaning?
 
A high PAP at diagonisis is a strong predictor that the PC is beyond both the surgical and radiation margins. For those considering salvage radiation after surgery it would be important information to know your PAP at diagosis.
 
JohnT

64 years old.

I had an initial PSA test in 1999 of 4.4. PSA increased every 6 months reaching 40 in 5-08. PSA free ranged from 16% to 10%. Over this time period I had a total of 13 biopsies and an endorectal MRIS all negative and have seen doctors at Long Beach, UCLA, UCSF and UCI. DX has always been BPH and continue to get biopsies every year.

In 10-08 I had a 25 core biopsy that showed 2 cores positive, gleason 6 at less than 5%. Surgery was recommended and I was in the process of interviewing surgeons when my wife's oncologist recommended I get a 2nd opinion from a prostate oncologist.

I saw Dr Sholtz, in Marina Del Rey, and he said that the path reports indicated no tumor, but indolant cancer clusters that didn't need any treatment. He was concerned that my PSA history indicated that I had a large amount of PC somewhere that had yet to be uncovered and put me through several more tests.

A color doppler targeted biopsy in 11-08 found a large tumor in the transition zone, gleason 6 and 7. Because of my high PSA Dr. suspected lymph node involvement, 30% chance, and sent me to Holland for a Combidex MRI, even though bone and CT scans were clear.

Combidex MRI showed clear lymph nodes and a 2,5 cm tumor in the anterior. I was his 1st patient to come up clear on the Combidex which has a 96% accuracy,

I've been on a no meat and dairy diet since 12-08 and PSA reduce to 30 while I awaited the Combidex MRI.

The location of the tumor in the anterior apex next to the urethea makes a good surgical margin very unlikely. Currently on Casodex and Proscar for 8 weeks to shrink my 60 mm prostate. Treatment will be seeds followed by 5 weeks of IMRT while continuing on Casodex and Proscar. So far no side affects from the Casodex.

As of April 10 and 7 weeks on Casodex and Proscar PSA has gone from 30 to 0.62 and protate from 60mm to 32mm. Very minor side affects. Doc says all this indicates tumor is not aggessive

Awaiting schedule for seed impants

 


James C.
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2007
Total Posts : 4462
   Posted 4/17/2009 9:15 PM (GMT -6)   
John, define a PAP? That's one I am not familiar with..
James C. Age 62
Co-Moderator- Prostate Cancer Forum
4/07 PSA 7.6, referred to Urologist, recheck 6.7
7/07 Biopsy: 3 of 16 PCa, 5% involved, left lobe, GS 3/3=6
9/07 Nerve sparing open RRP- Path Report: GS 3+3=6 Stg. pT2c, 110gms, margins clear
16 mts: ED- 50 mg Viagra 3X week, pump daily,Trimix .35ml 2X week continues
PSA's: .04 each 3 months


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 4/17/2009 9:25 PM (GMT -6)   

Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP)

Definition

The PAP test is a blood test that measures prostatic acid phosphatase (an enzyme found in men, primarily├é in the prostate gland and semen) to determine the health of the prostate gland. Prostate dysfunction results in the release of PAP into the blood.

Alternative Names

Prostatic acid phosphatase test; Serum acid phosphatase; Male PAP test <!-- Paragraphs -->

How the test is performed

Blood is drawn from a vein, usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. The puncture site is cleaned with antiseptic, and an elastic band or blood pressure cuff is placed around the upper arm. This causes veins below the band to swell with blood.

A needle is inserted into the vein, and the blood is collected in an air-tight vial or a syringe. During the procedure, the band is removed to restore circulation. Once the blood has been collected, the needle is removed, and the puncture site is covered to stop any bleeding.

How to prepare for the test

This test usually does not require special preparation. As with any blood test, the health care provider may limit certain foods or medications shortly before the test to assure an accurate sample.

Drugs that can interfere with PAP measurements include fluorides, oxalates, clofibrate, and alcohol

How the test will feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain, while others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing in the area.

Why the test is performed

This test is most often performed to determine whether you have prostate cancer, an abnormality of the prostate gland, or to follow the response of prostate cancer to treatment.

This test is no longer used routinely. The availability of the more sensitive and specific PSA assay has largely replaced the PAP test's clinical use.

Normal Values

Normal values vary from laboratory to laboratory. Please contact your laboratory or consult your health care provider for normal values.

What abnormal results mean

Abnormal PAP values can be obtained for many reasons. The most common reasons for abnormal PAP values include, but are not limited to:

  • Prostate cancer
  • Prostate cancer that has spread outside the prostate (particularly to bone)
  • Decreased blood flow to prostate
  • Paget's disease (bones become thicker and softer)
  • Anemia
  • Infection (usually severe)
  • Thrombophlebitis
  • Gaucher's disease
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Heart attack
  • Kidney disease
  • Physical stimulation of the prostate (colonoscopy, enemas, prostate examination)
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Prostatitis

What the risks are

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)
  • Multiple punctures to locate veins

Special considerations

Prostate cancer that is located only in the prostate gland may not produce high enough levels to indicate a problem. If your PAP test is normal it does not eliminate the possibility that you have prostate cancer.

Veins and arteries vary in size from one patient to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.



Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 4/17/2009 9:28 PM (GMT -6)   
I had a PAP test the result was inconclusive. My oncologist does not use them, but he has access to and uses CTC (Circulating Tumor Cell). CTC will become more popular once the device is more available. Right now three systems exist, but production has been set for '09.

Tony
Age 46 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Geason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (January 13, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4188
   Posted 4/17/2009 9:44 PM (GMT -6)   
PAP is Prostate Acid Phosphate. It used to be given alot before the psa test became popular. It is still very useful as a staging marker. It's a simple blood test like the psa. My point is that it appears to be significant in determining reoccurrance and why aren't more people like yourself and doctors aware of it and use it in the initial staging process.
My PAP was 1.5 even though my psa was 40. This made me more comfortable with my treatment as it was one more indicator that the PC was contained even though I had several high risk elements. Also my PSA3 was low another indicator of a non agressive PC. It's just one more test to give one more information about his particular cancer. All the information has to be put together to develop a clearer picture of your cancer. PSA and gleason don't tell the whole story, and I'm certain that this is only what most patients and doctors use in coming to a treatment decision.
JT

64 years old.

I had an initial PSA test in 1999 of 4.4. PSA increased every 6 months reaching 40 in 5-08. PSA free ranged from 16% to 10%. Over this time period I had a total of 13 biopsies and an endorectal MRIS all negative and have seen doctors at Long Beach, UCLA, UCSF and UCI. DX has always been BPH and continue to get biopsies every year.

In 10-08 I had a 25 core biopsy that showed 2 cores positive, gleason 6 at less than 5%. Surgery was recommended and I was in the process of interviewing surgeons when my wife's oncologist recommended I get a 2nd opinion from a prostate oncologist.

I saw Dr Sholtz, in Marina Del Rey, and he said that the path reports indicated no tumor, but indolant cancer clusters that didn't need any treatment. He was concerned that my PSA history indicated that I had a large amount of PC somewhere that had yet to be uncovered and put me through several more tests.

A color doppler targeted biopsy in 11-08 found a large tumor in the transition zone, gleason 6 and 7. Because of my high PSA Dr. suspected lymph node involvement, 30% chance, and sent me to Holland for a Combidex MRI, even though bone and CT scans were clear.

Combidex MRI showed clear lymph nodes and a 2,5 cm tumor in the anterior. I was his 1st patient to come up clear on the Combidex which has a 96% accuracy,

I've been on a no meat and dairy diet since 12-08 and PSA reduce to 30 while I awaited the Combidex MRI.

The location of the tumor in the anterior apex next to the urethea makes a good surgical margin very unlikely. Currently on Casodex and Proscar for 8 weeks to shrink my 60 mm prostate. Treatment will be seeds followed by 5 weeks of IMRT while continuing on Casodex and Proscar. So far no side affects from the Casodex.

As of April 10 and 7 weeks on Casodex and Proscar PSA has gone from 30 to 0.62 and protate from 60mm to 32mm. Very minor side affects. Doc says all this indicates tumor is not aggessive

Awaiting schedule for seed impants

 


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 4/17/2009 9:51 PM (GMT -6)   
John,
When you reference PSA3 tests are you referring to the PCA3 urine test? There are no tests called PSA3 for prostate cancer.

Tony
Age 46 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Geason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (January 13, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4188
   Posted 4/17/2009 10:20 PM (GMT -6)   
Tony,
It was the PCA3 urine test. Thanks for the correction.

64 years old.

I had an initial PSA test in 1999 of 4.4. PSA increased every 6 months reaching 40 in 5-08. PSA free ranged from 16% to 10%. Over this time period I had a total of 13 biopsies and an endorectal MRIS all negative and have seen doctors at Long Beach, UCLA, UCSF and UCI. DX has always been BPH and continue to get biopsies every year.

In 10-08 I had a 25 core biopsy that showed 2 cores positive, gleason 6 at less than 5%. Surgery was recommended and I was in the process of interviewing surgeons when my wife's oncologist recommended I get a 2nd opinion from a prostate oncologist.

I saw Dr Sholtz, in Marina Del Rey, and he said that the path reports indicated no tumor, but indolant cancer clusters that didn't need any treatment. He was concerned that my PSA history indicated that I had a large amount of PC somewhere that had yet to be uncovered and put me through several more tests.

A color doppler targeted biopsy in 11-08 found a large tumor in the transition zone, gleason 6 and 7. Because of my high PSA Dr. suspected lymph node involvement, 30% chance, and sent me to Holland for a Combidex MRI, even though bone and CT scans were clear.

Combidex MRI showed clear lymph nodes and a 2,5 cm tumor in the anterior. I was his 1st patient to come up clear on the Combidex which has a 96% accuracy,

I've been on a no meat and dairy diet since 12-08 and PSA reduce to 30 while I awaited the Combidex MRI.

The location of the tumor in the anterior apex next to the urethea makes a good surgical margin very unlikely. Currently on Casodex and Proscar for 8 weeks to shrink my 60 mm prostate. Treatment will be seeds followed by 5 weeks of IMRT while continuing on Casodex and Proscar. So far no side affects from the Casodex.

As of April 10 and 7 weeks on Casodex and Proscar PSA has gone from 30 to 0.62 and protate from 60mm to 32mm. Very minor side affects. Doc says all this indicates tumor is not aggessive

Awaiting schedule for seed impants

 


BillyMac
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 1858
   Posted 4/18/2009 3:58 AM (GMT -6)   
JohnT Here's another one for you. Perhaps it should be included in your poll. I'll take a punt and suggest that unlike you, the foolish patients on Healingwell (and other forums) didn't know of, or have that one done as well. eyes

"PSA RT-PCR: PSA (Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction)is a blood test that detects micrometastatic cells circulating in the blood stream; may be useful as a screening tool to help avoid unnecessary invasive treatments (RP, RT, etc.) on patients with metastasized Pca, although not FDA approved it is available at locations where FDA approved clinical trials of the test are being done."
www.moffitt.org/moffittapps/ccj/v5n6/article3.html
Bill
1/05 PSA----2.9 3/06-----3.2 3/07-------4.1 5/07------3.9 All negative DREs
Aged 59 when diagnosed
Biopsy 6/07
4 of 10 cores positive for Adenocarcinoma-------bummer!
Core 1 <5%, core 2----50%, core 3----60%, core 4----50%
Biopsy Pathologist's comment:
Gleason 4+3=7 (80% grade 4) Stage T2c
Neither extracapsular nor perineural invasion is identified
CT scan and Bone scan show no evidence of metastases
Da Vinci RP Aug 10th 2007
Post-op pathology:
Positive for perineural invasion and 1 small focal extension
Negative at surgical margins, negative node and negative vesicle involvement
Some 4+4=8 identified ........upgraded to Gleason 8
PSA Oct 07 <0.1 undetectable
PSA Jan 08 <0.1 undetectable
PSA April 08 <0.001 undetectable (disregarded due to lab "misreporting")
PSA August 08 <0.001 undetectable (disregarded due to lab "misreporting")
Post-op pathology rechecked by new lab:
Gleason downgraded to 4+3=7
Focal extension comprised of grade 3 cells
PSA September 08 <0.01 (new lab)
PSA February 09 <0.01

Post Edited (BillyMac) : 4/18/2009 4:10:32 AM (GMT-6)


John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4188
   Posted 4/18/2009 1:33 PM (GMT -6)   
Billy Mac,
Good info, but it's still in trial and looks promissing.

I don't think anyone on this forum is foolish, but simply uninformed as to the tests that are out there to either confirm or contradict their doctor's recommendation. The more informed the less mistakes and better results.

Having only a gleason and a PSA is simply not enough information on which to base a decision that will follow you for the rest of your life.

64 years old.

I had an initial PSA test in 1999 of 4.4. PSA increased every 6 months reaching 40 in 5-08. PSA free ranged from 16% to 10%. Over this time period I had a total of 13 biopsies and an endorectal MRIS all negative and have seen doctors at Long Beach, UCLA, UCSF and UCI. DX has always been BPH and continue to get biopsies every year.

In 10-08 I had a 25 core biopsy that showed 2 cores positive, gleason 6 at less than 5%. Surgery was recommended and I was in the process of interviewing surgeons when my wife's oncologist recommended I get a 2nd opinion from a prostate oncologist.

I saw Dr Sholtz, in Marina Del Rey, and he said that the path reports indicated no tumor, but indolant cancer clusters that didn't need any treatment. He was concerned that my PSA history indicated that I had a large amount of PC somewhere that had yet to be uncovered and put me through several more tests.

A color doppler targeted biopsy in 11-08 found a large tumor in the transition zone, gleason 6 and 7. Because of my high PSA Dr. suspected lymph node involvement, 30% chance, and sent me to Holland for a Combidex MRI, even though bone and CT scans were clear.

Combidex MRI showed clear lymph nodes and a 2,5 cm tumor in the anterior. I was his 1st patient to come up clear on the Combidex which has a 96% accuracy,

I've been on a no meat and dairy diet since 12-08 and PSA reduce to 30 while I awaited the Combidex MRI.

The location of the tumor in the anterior apex next to the urethea makes a good surgical margin very unlikely. Currently on Casodex and Proscar for 8 weeks to shrink my 60 mm prostate. Treatment will be seeds followed by 5 weeks of IMRT while continuing on Casodex and Proscar. So far no side affects from the Casodex.

As of April 10 and 7 weeks on Casodex and Proscar PSA has gone from 30 to 0.62 and protate from 60mm to 32mm. Very minor side affects. Doc says all this indicates tumor is not aggessive

Awaiting schedule for seed impants

 


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 4/18/2009 2:32 PM (GMT -6)   

For the most part we have the following after being told we have cancer:

1> PSA...We read on the web that over 10 is an issue but still treatable locally.  Over 20 is less likely to benefit from local treatments.

2> Gleason...Over 6 is more concerning, over 7 is definate high risk.

3> Age...We know what our life expectancy is.  The younger the patient, the more aggressive the treament decisions.  Rightly so.

4> % of positive cores, % of the cores that were malignant...Less the 20 is a good number for both.  (mine were 50, and 90 respectively)

5> Clinical Stage...Anything over T1C is indicatitive of needed action.

6> Bone scans, MRI, and CT Scans.

Most people should have at east this much before making a decision.  And for more than half the guys, that is enough information to decide on local or systemic treatments or even watchful waiting.  Anywhere there are gray areas, more detailed tests can be run, but they are also imperfect and could lead to a decision will be less effective than another option. 

We need more than what's out there, here or abroad.  No question.  Instead what we have is a lot of debate about treatment options, diagnostic tests, and little more than we had thirty years ago save early screening that has led to lower mortality rates and perplexing debates in the media by our own doctors.  eyes

Oy,

Tony

 


John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4188
   Posted 4/18/2009 3:46 PM (GMT -6)   
Tony,
I'll add acouple of more thoughts to your list.

For low grade cancer, low PSA, gleason ect the most important thing to determine is if the cancer is indolant or really a tumor.

In intermediate and high grade the most important information to know is if is contained, or if it has penetrated the capsule or metastazied.

Knowing the size and location of the tumor is also important and will affect decision making.

64 years old.

I had an initial PSA test in 1999 of 4.4. PSA increased every 6 months reaching 40 in 5-08. PSA free ranged from 16% to 10%. Over this time period I had a total of 13 biopsies and an endorectal MRIS all negative and have seen doctors at Long Beach, UCLA, UCSF and UCI. DX has always been BPH and continue to get biopsies every year.

In 10-08 I had a 25 core biopsy that showed 2 cores positive, gleason 6 at less than 5%. Surgery was recommended and I was in the process of interviewing surgeons when my wife's oncologist recommended I get a 2nd opinion from a prostate oncologist.

I saw Dr Sholtz, in Marina Del Rey, and he said that the path reports indicated no tumor, but indolant cancer clusters that didn't need any treatment. He was concerned that my PSA history indicated that I had a large amount of PC somewhere that had yet to be uncovered and put me through several more tests.

A color doppler targeted biopsy in 11-08 found a large tumor in the transition zone, gleason 6 and 7. Because of my high PSA Dr. suspected lymph node involvement, 30% chance, and sent me to Holland for a Combidex MRI, even though bone and CT scans were clear.

Combidex MRI showed clear lymph nodes and a 2,5 cm tumor in the anterior. I was his 1st patient to come up clear on the Combidex which has a 96% accuracy,

I've been on a no meat and dairy diet since 12-08 and PSA reduce to 30 while I awaited the Combidex MRI.

The location of the tumor in the anterior apex next to the urethea makes a good surgical margin very unlikely. Currently on Casodex and Proscar for 8 weeks to shrink my 60 mm prostate. Treatment will be seeds followed by 5 weeks of IMRT while continuing on Casodex and Proscar. So far no side affects from the Casodex.

As of April 10 and 7 weeks on Casodex and Proscar PSA has gone from 30 to 0.62 and protate from 60mm to 32mm. Very minor side affects. Doc says all this indicates tumor is not aggessive

Awaiting schedule for seed impants

 


Ed C. (Old67)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 2457
   Posted 4/18/2009 5:32 PM (GMT -6)   
John,
It good to know all of these available tests before someone makes a decision. Unfortunately there is no one place where someone can access it in one place. It will be nice if we had a decision chart that guides newly diagnosed men to what tests are available and which ones are applicable to their condition.
Age: 67
PSA 9/05 1.15; 8/06 1.45; 12/07 2.41; 8/08 3.9; 11/08 3.5 free PSA 11%
Dx 12/30/08
2 cores out of 12 were positive Gleason (4+4) and (4+5)
Negative CT scan and bone scan done on 1/16
Robotic surgery performed 2/9/09
Surgeon: Dr. Randy Fagin, Austin TX.
Pathology report:
Prostate weighed 57 grams size:5.2 x 5.0 x 4.9 cm
Bilateral 10-20% involved
Gleason 4+4
both nerve bundles removed,
pT3a Nx Mx
Negative margins
seminal vesicles clean
Lymph nodes: not dissected
1st PSA test 4/7/09 result <0.1


BillyMac
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 1858
   Posted 4/18/2009 9:20 PM (GMT -6)   
Ed C,
I applaud your suggestion for a chart listing all the currently available staging tests and their advantages and disadvantages. This would allow the newly diagnosed to examine what tests are available and could be of assistance when facing such a major decision as treatment ( or not) for this disease. If someone were to do that, rather than indulging in an asinine attempt at intellectual point scoring, it could be of immense benefit to our community, especially the untreated newcomers.
Bill
1/05 PSA----2.9 3/06-----3.2 3/07-------4.1 5/07------3.9 All negative DREs
Aged 59 when diagnosed
Biopsy 6/07
4 of 10 cores positive for Adenocarcinoma-------bummer!
Core 1 <5%, core 2----50%, core 3----60%, core 4----50%
Biopsy Pathologist's comment:
Gleason 4+3=7 (80% grade 4) Stage T2c
Neither extracapsular nor perineural invasion is identified
CT scan and Bone scan show no evidence of metastases
Da Vinci RP Aug 10th 2007
Post-op pathology:
Positive for perineural invasion and 1 small focal extension
Negative at surgical margins, negative node and negative vesicle involvement
Some 4+4=8 identified ........upgraded to Gleason 8
PSA Oct 07 <0.1 undetectable
PSA Jan 08 <0.1 undetectable
PSA April 08 <0.001 undetectable (disregarded due to lab "misreporting")
PSA August 08 <0.001 undetectable (disregarded due to lab "misreporting")
Post-op pathology rechecked by new lab:
Gleason downgraded to 4+3=7
Focal extension comprised of grade 3 cells
PSA September 08 <0.01 (new lab)
PSA February 09 <0.01

Post Edited (BillyMac) : 4/18/2009 9:29:43 PM (GMT-6)


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 4/18/2009 10:28 PM (GMT -6)   
John,
I am not aware of any test or imagine that determines with any clear accuracy whether a tumor is indolent or not. Also what might be indolent for a 70 year old, probably is not for a 40 year old. In fact, I don't believe ANY tumor is indolent to a 40 year old with 39 year life expectancy. This is not the watchful waiting question again. Given enough time all tumors can and likely will wreak havic. Our friend Zufus pointed out well that there are several different tumor types. So because of that, not where the tumor is nor it's Gleason grade can be trusted on their own merits.

Ed,
A chart would be great. But for now the best we have are nomagrams and tables. Probability is the best tool we have, and the above information can help determine probability. Any finer information vecomes less useful over time.

Tony
Age 46 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Geason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (January 13, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
Forum Information
Currently it is Friday, April 20, 2018 11:59 PM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 2,953,830 posts in 324,045 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 162112 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, onceforaday.
268 Guest(s), 6 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Wienie, onceforaday, Alwaysworried1991, mordant, Another UC Mum, Kathy77