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55 and healthy in NJ
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 5/16/2009 6:34 PM (GMT -6)   
45 hours to go until I check in for my surgery.  Sunday night is my double date with MagCitrate and Fleet.  Oh, and the wife, of course.  Here's hoping for the best, and I'll see you guys on the other side.  Now where did I put that Xanax?
 
Greg

Age 55
Physical exam (01/22/2009): blood pressure 130/85, good EKG; basically all-around healthy
PSA 4.9 (02/05/2009)
Urologist DRE observed slightly hardened left lobe (02/19/2009)
Chest X-ray normal (02/23/2009)
Biopsy (03/03/2009)
PCa present in all sextants, <5% to 50%
Prostate gland 37 grams
Gleason score 7 (in two sextants, scored 6 elsewhere)
Cystoscopy (05/08/2009), showed clear
MRI (05/08/2009), "No findings are present to suggest extracapsular tumor."
Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy scheduled for 05/18/2009 - getting admitted at 5:30 am
 
 
Surgery (daVinci robotic) consult with Michael Esposito, M.D., http://www.roboticurology.com/ (03/30/2009)
Radiation oncology (Varian IMRT/IGRT RapidArc) consult with Mark Macher, M.D., http://www.njneuro.org/fp/gammateam.asp (04/08/2009)
Other resources: Dr. Peter Scardino's Prostate Book (Peter Scardino (Sloan-Kettering), 2005); Urologic Robotic Surgery (Michael Esposito, Vincent Lanteri & Jeffrey Stock, 2007)


DS Can
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 5/16/2009 9:00 PM (GMT -6)   

Greg,

I wish you all the best with your surgery, recovery and follow up.

Being in good health going into surgery has its advantages.  It is also great to have a supportive wife during this time.  My wife was kind enough to clean my catheter bags each time I switched.  The last thing she wanted for me was to get an infection.

The best advice I can give is to take it easy at first.  Be as active as you can comfortably be.  I spent a lot of time in the recliner with headphones on listening to relaxing and inspirational music.

You have found a great resource in this forum.  I have gained a lot of insight into what to expect with recovery and followup.  There is so much support for anything you might need to deal with.

Keeping a positive attitude and having a sense of humor about it all can help your days go better.  Don't be afraid to tell your nurse how you really feel.  You don't have to be Superman again until at least three weeks after surgery.  If you need a massage, get a massage.

You will be in my prayers,

DS 


PSA 01/07 was 1.2, PSA 01/08 was 1.9, PSA 01/09 was 2.5.
BIOPSY 02/24/09, adenocarcinoma DX at age 52
 Right:GS 3+3=6, tumor 3/6 cores, 10% involvement,PNI-Yes
 Left: GS 3+3=6, tumor 1/7 cores, <5% involvement,PNI-No
LARP 04/09/09,nerve sparing. Final pathology:
 GS 3+4=7, Margins uninvolved, 2 lymph nodes negative.
Catheter removed on 04/17. First no-pad day was 05/03.
ED treatment is 25 mg nightly.
First followup PSA results on 05/28/09
 
 

Post Edited (DS Can) : 5/16/2009 9:06:27 PM (GMT-6)


TeddyG
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 133
   Posted 5/16/2009 9:18 PM (GMT -6)   
Greg,
Best wishes for the procedure. It is almost a relief once you decide what to do, to get on with it. As far as expectations, the hardest part of the immediate post-op was getting the digestive system back in sync since there is bloating associated with the procedure. Gotta love the nurses who will be there for you. This is Chapter 2 in the book :The Treatment, followed by Ch.3 The Recovery which is a bit of a blur, measured not in time but in the diminishing antibiotic pills you will take daily until the catheter is gone. One day you will realize "hey there are only 3 pills left, then 2, then ..."
Keep in touch with this forum and you will know what to expect and get answers along the way.
TeddyG
Background:
Age 55, two teens, very fit cyclist (avg 2000+ miles per year) and weight, diet, etc. consistent with good habits. Stressful job as attorney; very supporting wife who is helping me through every stage of this war.
Stats:
2006 PSA - 1.5
2007 PSA - 2.3
2008 PSA - 5.3 (18 mos.)
2009 Jan. 20 - Biopsy 12 samples
        Feb 3 Dx 2/12 samples positive, low volume  (5% and 7-10%)
Gleason 3+4, later downgraded by second opinion at Johns-Hopkins to 3+3, but "it's still PCa" as my Doc said.
Laproscopic surgery April 9,  University of KY Medical Center, Lexington, 3 days in hospital, catheter removal April 21.
Pathology: clear margins, no cancer in prostate: told that this is very rare and Doc has only seen it in 3 out of over 1400 cases; I rearched the concept of "vanishing cancer" and found a tumor classification of tP0 and asked Doc if it applied to me. He said that it was unlikely because if a pathologist had done a much more detailed analysis of the tissue, he would likely find more foci somewhere, and biopsy found "needle in the haystack as opposed to the tip of the iceberg"; Nevertheless, it is a blessing;
Regardless of the science, my family says "miracle."
Now working w/ post-surgery issues....
 


Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 5/17/2009 3:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Good luck to you!!!

Age 54   - 5'11"   205lbs
Overall Heath Condition - Good
PSA - July 2007 & Jan 2008 -> 1.3
Biopsy - 03/04/08 -> Gleason 6 
 
06/25/08 - Da Vinci robotic laparoscopy
Catheter in for five weeks.
Dry after 3 months.
 
10/03/08 - 1st Quarter PSA -> less then .01
01/16/09 - 2nd Quarter PSA -> less then .01
xx/xx/xx   - 3rd Quater skipped
05/14/09  - 4th Quarter PSA -> less then .01
Surgeon - Keith A. Waguespack, M.D.
 


Bluenose
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 260
   Posted 5/17/2009 1:57 PM (GMT -6)   

 

  Good luck to you Greg, the waiting is the worst!  You'll do great....see ya' on the other side.


 
  age: 53 @ Dx, Pre-op PSA Feb 08' 5.0, April 08' 4.1
  Biopsy 5.1.08, 5 of 15 cores postive, T2a, Gleason 3+4=7
  DaVinci performed 7.29.08
  Bladder sling installed, umbilical hernia repaired during surgery.
  Path report, "cancer fully contained, margins clear".
  Cath removed 8.8.08, ED therapy begins 8.9.08
  100mg Viagra three times a week, pump for ten minutes daily
  and hold for ten minutes.
  8.16.08 switched to Levitra 20mg, immediate results
  9.15.08 Pad free at night, one thin (light) pad during the day
  9.18.08 1st Post-op PSA Undetectable Zero's....Yes!
  12.22.08 2nd Post-op PSA  Zero's still...
  Pads gone 1.3.09, finally found the courage...Thanks ya'll
          ".....tryin' to reason with hurricane season...."
       


Magaboo
Veteran Member


Date Joined Oct 2006
Total Posts : 1210
   Posted 5/17/2009 8:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Best wishes and hopes for a good outcome and a quick, complete recovery.

Magaboo
Born Sept 1936
PSA 7.9
-ve DRE
Gleason's Score 3+4=7, 2 of 8 positive
open RP 28 Nov 06 (nerve sparing), Post op staging T3a
Gleasons still 3+4=7
Seminal vesicles and lymph nodes clear
Catheter out 15 Dec 06, Dry since 11 Feb 07
All PSA tests in 2007 (4) <.04
PSA tests in 2008: Mar.=.04; Jun.=.05; Sept.=.08; 3 days before Rad Start=0.1
Salvage RT completed (33 sessions - 66 Grays) on the 19th Dec., 08.
PSA on the 26 Jan., 09, =0.05. PSA tests now every 6 month


mirv
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 30
   Posted 5/17/2009 11:09 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey Greg,
Best of luck with the surgery, it'll be over before you know it and then you'll be on the recovery side!
Take it real easy for awhile and let us know how you're doing!
Mark
Age 52
PSA 3.1 fPSA 26% Dx: 11-07-08
1 of 12 cores with 5% adenocarcinoma
11 of 12 cores clear Gleason grade 3+3=6
Robotic laproscopic surgery 2-4-09
Dr. Garret Matsunaga, Torrance Memorial Hosp.
Free hernia repair! 2 day stay.
Pathology: pT2c NXMX
upgraded to 3+4=7 and <2% tertiary 5
negative margins
negative extraprostatic extension
negative seminal vesicle invasion


nemo57
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 43
   Posted 5/18/2009 6:59 AM (GMT -6)   
Good luck, I went with Esposito and Lanteri and they were great. You will be in my prayers. See you on the other side.
New Jersey
Age 51
Psa 0.9
Biospy 1 core positive
Gleason 3+3-6
Surgery date Aug.11, 2008 at Monmouth Medicial Center
Robotic Surgery By Dr. Lanteri And Dr. Esposito
Both nerve bundles saved. Margins clear.
Gleason score stayed at 3+3-6. Cancer contained to prostate.
1-2 pads a day. No problems at night.
ED 25mg viagra at night. Usable erections 1 day after catheter was removed.
First PSA Oct 2008 <0.1


dsmc
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 149
   Posted 5/18/2009 7:13 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Greg,
Check on the counter behind the tooth paste for the Xanax ...lol. I know what you mean. I wish you the best and a speedy recovery. Sounds like you have it figured out.

David
Age 53
Pre-op PSA 4.3
Surgery Feb. 17 2005
Post-op Path : Gleason 3+3=6
Right pelvic lymph nodes: negative for metastatic carcinoma
Left pelvic lymph nodes: negative for metastatic carcinoma
extent: right lobe 40% left lobe 10%
capsular penetration: Absent
Seminal vesicles and vasa differentia: Uninvolved
Prostate: 26 grams
Post-op PSA's <0.04 for 3 years
Feb. 08: 0.07, March 08: 0.08, June 08: 0.09 and Sept. 08: 0.1
IGRT scheduled.....November 17th....
FINISHED 01/14/09 YEA!
05/14/09
1st PSA after Salvage RT <0.04..... Another YEA!


55 and healthy in NJ
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 5/21/2009 4:03 PM (GMT -6)   
5/21/09  UPDATE
 
Good news first:  Dr. Esposito told my wife and my brother (as I was still out from the anesthesia) that both nerve bundles were spared, and both lymph nodes were clear.  He also believes there is a negative surgical margin, but final confirmation will come from the pathology.  So far so good!
 
Funny how with all the research I did about the daVinci surgery, and the incontinence and impotence side effects, I didn't read up on issues associated with the post-op recovery from the surgery itself.  For instance:
 
1.  I went into the O.R. Monday morning at 7:00 am.  At 11:50 am, when waking up from the anesthesia in the recovery room, I had severe pains from both the incision site with the J-P drain as well as from my herniated and bulging discs at L4 and L5 -- a pre-existing condition I discussed with my anesthesiologist in pre-op.  Not that anything was done to my vertebra, it's just that being in the same position for so long on my back creates a strain that is quite discomforting.  And with all this, I had to get up the strength to moan loud enough that someone wandered over and offered me some morphine, i.e., "describe your pain on a scale of 0 to 10."  They wouldn't release me from recovery even though a room was available because I was still in pain, but a second dose of morphine took care of that.
 
2.  I was drowsy, so my family left for a while and I had the room to myself, until Dr. Esposito's second RALP of the day showed up to become my roommate for the night.  Neither one of us got any sleep due to stomach cramps and bloating.  Or was it bladder cramps and bloating?  Not really sure actually.  And with the two drains in me (the J-P and the Foley) there wasn't much I could do to alleviate the pressure on my back since I had to stay in the one position.  More morphine.  And the hospital special menu of broth, jello, flavored ice and apple juice.  But the night nurse assistant was nice to us, and at 3 in the morning we both got extra flavored ice.
 
3.  By late Tuesday morning after a couple of suppositories from one of the nurses (my dignity being lost hours earlier) along with a couple of stool softeners, I had my first bowel movement, which is a prerequisite to being discharged (alternatively: passing gas).  They also started me walking the floor, and I did at least a half dozen laps without incident.  Then the physician on duty stopped by to take out the Jackson-Pratt (J-P) drain, which is an event all unto itself.  I haven't read about this anywhere on the forum, so I'll describe it here for the uninformed:  this is a small drain that hangs off the side of your abdomen to collect the leftover surgical blood from your abdominal cavity.  Due to its shape, the nurses refer to it as the "hand grenade."  It is sewn in place in such a way that the physician described its removal as "pulling on the thread like a purse string."   This didn't sound too bad, and I wasn't expecting much even when the physician brought two interns with him to witness the procedure.  He told me to take a deep breath, then exhale, and when I exhaled, he ripped out the drain and pushed as hard as he could on the spot to immediately pull the thread tight and stop any bleeding.  When he pushed down as hard as he could, I did a "YIKES!" and imagined I had shot up in the air three feet.  It was more the shock of the unexpected rather than the actual pain of the procedure, which if anything lasted ten seconds or so.
 
4.  Finally they sent the head nurse over with my final care instructions, specifically, how to put on a leg bag and an overnight bag to collect the urine draining from the catheter that wouldn't come out until the following Tuesday (normally only a week later, but with next Monday being Memorial Day I have to suffer an extra day).  It seems that no matter where the Statlock was placed on my leg it would tug on me if I moved a certain way.  So we found a compromise location and I finished getting carefully into my sweatpants to go home. . .
 
5. . . . until they ran after me to say oops the doctor wants me to go to radiology for an ultrasound of my legs so I can't leave yet.  I get wheeled down to the first floor and unceremonially left alone in the wheelchair for I don't know how long until someone came to get me.  I then had to carefully take off my sweatpants and climb onto the ultrasound table, where two 20-something attractive young ladies took turns rubbing the ultrasound probe up and down my inner thighs.  As I said earlier, my dignity was long gone by this point.  As part of the process, my catheter Statlock and leg bag were removed from my leg.  They attempted to relocate it in the original position, but not being experts in catheters it didn't happen.  It was clear that I would need to take care of this upstairs, so I decided to wait until then to carefully get into my sweatpants again.  At that point I had the less than enjoyable privilege of sitting outside radiology in the wheel chair for 15 minutes waiting to be rescued, with my sweatpants acting as a back pillow and a hospital gown camouflaging my memorable experience from the many hospital visitors walking the first floor hallways.  Ah, dignity, where hast ye gone?
 
6.  Finally I'm allowed to go home, and my wife and I have an entertaining discussion about whether it's better to fly over the bumps or go slowly over each and every one.  Fortunately, Drs. Esposito and Lanteri opened a second office at the Jersey Shore close to my home (since nobody else at the hospital knew how to work the daVinci, so I'm told) so my journey is only about 15 minutes instead of an hour and a half.  I made it upstairs alright and within a couple of hours discovered that the leg bag will need to be drained about once an hour.  It was getting close to bedtime so I switched to the overnight bag and that's when my first interesting night began.  With the wife in the guest room, I spent most of the night watching old movies on TCM and wondering why my catheter leaked blood every time I sat down on the toilet to try to move my bowels.  Was the Statlock in the wrong place?  Not enough slack in the catheter?  This can't be good.  I fashioned a hook out of a shirt hanger so that it would be easier to transport the overnight bag back and forth from the night table to the bathroom.  The hanger also fits over the pull drawer at the sink.  My wife retrieved our "extension arm grabber thing" from the garage so that I wouldn't have to bend over or reach down to pick something up.  It also comes in handy reaching to the other side of the bed for the stack of discharge papers with the post-op instructions for me to read over and over again why my urine is pink or red colored in the bag and what to do about it.  (Answer:  keep drinking until the color changes.)  On the night table within reach is water, jello, flavored ices, etc. just like in the hospital, along with my antibiotic, Tylenol with Codeine (Rx) and stool softener.  On the bed within reach is my 12-hour nasal spray (TIP: don't try blowing a stuffy nose until you've healed), extra surgical tape to keep the catheter tubing in place on my leg, extra gauze to catch any catheter urine or blood leaks, and a thermometer.  It didn't take long for me to realize that the urge to move my bowels is probably gas trying to come out.  But lying on one's back with a full bladder makes it difficult for the gas to actually escape, and trying to turn over with the catheter in you presents a different challenge.  Then there's always the possibility that it really is a bowel movement so the prudent thing to do is to get up and make your way to the bathroom anyway.  I finally figured out that it's the straining to try to pass gas or have a BM that causes the blood leakage at the catheter, and somewhere else in the forum it's explained that this is caused by the abdominal muscles pushing the catheter out of position inside the bladder.  Lovely.  Every movement I make usually involves my abdominals, from sitting down, to standing up, and from getting into bed to getting out of bed.  So I try to compensate by using my arms and neck muscles as much as possible.  And now I have sore arms and a sore neck.
 
7.  Wednesday morning comes and I've hardly had any sleep.  By 5 am I can't stand it any longer and I pound on the wall for my wife to come and get me some refills on my liquid diet, because I'm too unstable and nervous to navigate the stairs by myself in the dark.  All goes well for a few hours and I finally get some much-needed sleep, only to wake up and find a stream of blood in my catheter and a bag full of pink liquid.  More water, apple juice and Arizona green iced tea and stay off my feet for another day.  Feeling flushed I check my temperature and it's 100 degrees, still under the limit.  I call the doctor's office anyway and leave a message.  The nurse from the hospital independently calls to follow-up.  Fever under 101, pink urine, stomach cramps, are all normal.  The doctor's office calls back, same thing.  Okay, I keep drinking and it will go away.  I start experimenting with solid food:  chicken noodle soup, apple sauce, scrambled eggs, some prunes.  No stomach issues, but no BM either.  Well I don't want to strain any more, so as long as I stay gassy I'm happy for now.
 
8.  Wednesday night I actually slept for 5 hours straight, which resulted in another deep pink bagful of urine by first light on Thursday.  Back to the water to flush it out.  I don't see any leakage at the catheter, so it's all part of the normal healing process, right?  No need to panic.  A couple of bottles of Arizona green iced tea later and the urine color is back to its normal clear pale yellow.  For breakfast I have a couple of Weetabix cakes soaked in hot tea, which ordinarily leads to a soft BM within a half hour.  Not this time, probably because there's nothing significant in my GI tract yet.  Not to worry, it's good fiber.  Fiber is good.  More prunes.  For lunch, I put on the boxer shorts my wife got me, which requires the empty bag to be folded and routed through the shorts leg in order for me to walk around the house using my shirt hanger.  I decide the reclining end of the sofa is best and I sit there with my Arizona green iced tea and my chicken soup with noodles.  Everything is fine until I try to get up an hour later, which requires my wife to help put the seat back down.  I assist by giving the bottom of the chair a final push with both feet, and then regret that decision when the catheter "burps" a backflow at me.  Yeeouch!
 
9.  Thursday afternoon I send my wife out to the store for some apple cider after reading on the forum that it's good for promoting BMs.  I note that my supply of Tylenol with Codeine is down to 10 and I don't think I can last the holiday weekend without a refill.  But when my doctor finally calls me back he says I shouldn't be needing it as the pain by my incision should be going away any time now and OTC Tylenol Extra Strength should be good enough.  I sure hope he's right.  Before my wife gets home I feel a BM coming on so I get out of bed, still with the hose through the boxers and as I round the corner, some gas escapes, along with urine out the catheter, which promptly flows along the outside of the hose and down my leg.  I instinctively drop my drawers to the floor and then realize that by doing so I'm unable to transport the bag at the proper height.  I turn around to grab the "extension arm grabber thing" and use that to pull by boxers back up, so that I can empty the bag, so that I can reroute the empty bag back through the boxers, so that I can kick off the boxers and throw them into the bathtub.  And only then can I clean up the mess I made.  Oh and no BM to show for it after all.  Meanwhile my 11-year old has gotten off the schoolbus and read my wife's note to her that it's okay to come see me because I'm wearing boxers.  I stopped her just in time.
 
So here it is Thursday evening and I'm writing this as my wife prepares plain spaghetti for my supper.  I am SO looking forward to my first non-straining BM.  I really was unaware that the post-op phase of my journey would be so "entertaining."
 
Greg
 
 
 

Age 55
Physical exam (01/22/2009): blood pressure 130/85, good EKG; basically all-around healthy
PSA 4.9 (02/05/2009)
Urologist DRE observed slightly hardened left lobe (02/19/2009)
Chest X-ray normal (02/23/2009)
Biopsy (03/03/2009)
PCa present in all sextants, <5% to 50%
Prostate gland 37 grams
Gleason score 7 (in two sextants, scored 6 elsewhere)
Cystoscopy (05/08/2009), showed clear
MRI (05/08/2009), "No findings are present to suggest extracapsular tumor."
Robot-assisted (daVinci) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (05/18/2009) by Michael Esposito, M.D. and Vincent Lanteri, M.D.  Both nerve bundles spared.  Awaiting final pathology report to verify that PCa was contained within the capsule.
 
 
Research:
Surgery (daVinci robotic) consult with Michael Esposito, M.D., http://www.roboticurology.com/ (03/30/2009)
Radiation oncology (Varian IMRT/IGRT RapidArc) consult with Mark Macher, M.D., http://www.njneuro.org/fp/gammateam.asp (04/08/2009)
Other resources: Dr. Peter Scardino's Prostate Book (Peter Scardino (Sloan-Kettering), 2005); Urologic Robotic Surgery (Michael Esposito, Vincent Lanteri & Jeffrey Stock, 2007)


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 5/21/2009 8:26 PM (GMT -6)   
Excellent narrative, Greg,
I remember my surgery well by just reading your post. LOL. when I was still wearing my catheter there was plenty of entertainment. When I lost the catheter it was back to living. I healed quickly and was walking three miles a day within a couple weeks. I felt great. All of this will be a distant memory in short time.

Thank you for the post.

Tony
 Age 46 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Geason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 11, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


nemo57
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 43
   Posted 5/22/2009 6:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Glad to hear that your surgery went well. Sounds like they got all the cancer and everything else was clear. I too thought the drain removal the next day was the the most pain i had felt in a long time. Hope you continue to feel better. Good luck
 
Jeff
New Jersey
Age 51
Psa 0.9
Biospy 1 core positive
Gleason 3+3-6
Surgery date Aug.11, 2008 at Monmouth Medicial Center
Robotic Surgery By Dr. Lanteri And Dr. Esposito
Both nerve bundles saved. Margins clear.
Gleason score stayed at 3+3-6. Cancer contained to prostate.
1-2 pads a day. No problems at night.
ED 25mg viagra at night. Usable erections 1 day after catheter was removed.
First PSA Oct 2008 <0.1


geezer99
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 5/22/2009 8:22 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the great narrative. It illustrates that the longer you have a catheter the better you get with it – but is this a skill that anyone wants to acquire? Like some others here I found that, when I was moving around, jockey shorts allowed me to do a better job of immobilizing both the catheter and my own apparatus.

By the way, codeine can contribute to constipation which may be one of the reasons that your doctor wants you to try to do without. When my laxatives and stool softeners finally took hold it kept me pretty busy all day. But that is a good sign of returning function.

Try to enjoy the weekend and notice how great life, even with a cath, is.
Age at diagnosis 66, PSA 5.5
Biopsy 12/08 12 cores, 8 positive
Gleason 3 + 4 = 7
CAT scan 1/09 negative, Bone scan 1/09 negative

Robotic surgery 03/03/09 Catheter Removed 03/08/09
Post surgical pathology report. Lymph nodes negative, Seminal vesicles negative
Surgical margins positive, Capsular penetration extensive Gleason 4 + 3 = 7
At 6 weeks: 1 pad/day, 1 pad/night -- mostly dry at night.


SHU93
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2008
Total Posts : 328
   Posted 5/22/2009 9:11 AM (GMT -6)   
Greg,
One thing my doc recommended which helped out alot is Prunes, and prune juice! It cleared all my gas my stools were very soft and easy flowing. Keep in mind the pain meds side effect is hard stools and constipation..double edged sword your in pain take meds and causes strain which cause more pain. Go slow with the prunes and prune juice they are potent but helps the gases get out!!!
 
Livestrong!
 
SHU93
Age Dx 37, 7/2008
First PSA : 4.17 5/2008
Second PSA After 2 weeks of antibiotics : 3.9 6/2008
DRE: Negative 5/2008
Biopsy : 6 out 12 Postive all on right side, Gleason 7 (3+4).
Bone Scan/CAT Scan: Clear 7/2008
Cystoscope: Normal 7/2008
Prostate MRI: Normal 7/2008
Da Vinci Surgery 7/2008
PostOp: T2c (On Both sides), margins clear, seminal clear, nodes, clear. Gleason 6(3+3).
First PostOp PSA 9/2008: <0.01
2nd PSA 12/2008: <0.1 (Different Lab then 1st)
3rd PSA 3/2009: <0.1
 
 


DS Can
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 5/22/2009 9:49 PM (GMT -6)   

Greg,

I hope that your recovery continues to go well.

My wife watched the drain removal.  She thought it was nasty.

If you are still having back pain be sure to keep a couple of pillows under your knees when you lay on your back.  They can also be placed between your knees/thighs if you want to try laying on your side.  I know it is difficult to maneuver around the catheter, but it can be done.  One problem I had was a pain in my right shoulder, even as I was waking up from anesthesia.  I suspect that my arm was placed somewhere for surgery that was not natural.  I was able to get some massage therapy relief by kneeling on a step stool and placing my chest on the table.  The therapist was also able to massage the lower back and pelvis area a little bit, but not to extent that could provide some deep pressure relief.  That reminds me -- I promised myself I was going back.

Take care,

DS


PSA 01/07 was 1.2, PSA 01/08 was 1.9, PSA 01/09 was 2.5.
BIOPSY 02/24/09, adenocarcinoma DX at age 52
 Right:GS 3+3=6, tumor 3/6 cores, 10% involvement,PNI-Yes
 Left: GS 3+3=6, tumor 1/7 cores, <5% involvement,PNI-No
LARP 04/09/09,nerve sparing. Final pathology:
 GS 3+4=7, Margins uninvolved, 2 lymph nodes negative.
Catheter removed on 04/17. First no-pad day was 05/03.
ED treatment is 25 mg Viagra nightly.
First followup PSA blood draw 05/21, results on 05/28/09
 
 


55 and healthy in NJ
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 5/22/2009 10:55 PM (GMT -6)   

5/22/2009 UPDATE

More good news today, thanks to your posts above and last night's 4:00 am read of information posted at "Post surgery constipation problems",  http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=1299294.  I think you are right on target regarding the Tylenol with Codeine being a contributor to constipation, so I ditched it today and had my wife get me some Tylenol Extra Strength, which my doctor recommended.  After two more milks of magnesia this morning, I had the first tidal wave around lunchtime, followed by two more avalanches in the afternoon, and another two eruptions in the evening.   But even though I wasn't consciously straining, I still experienced some leakage around the catheter, although with not as much blood as the last couple of days.  What's up with that?  Plus, this evening I observed some burning associated with the leakage.  I probably had the same thing before, but that's when I thought it was somehow being caused by the catheter tugging on my penis, and now I'm thinking the urethra at the penis end has become irritated, so when the catheter moves inside the bladder during a BM attempt, causing urine to drip out of the penis, the acidic urine is causing the burning sensation.  Does that sound right?  I also became concerned this afternoon when I got my third straight late afternoon fever.  Wednesday was 100, Thursday was 99.5 and today (Friday) it got up to 100.5.  I certainly don't want to get a urinary tract infection or a bladder infection, but other than drinking lots of water to dilute the urine, I'm not sure what to do.  I'm guessing it's all related.  Any suggestions?

I moved up to egg salad on wheat bread today, so that's progress.  Plus I now have a handy bowl of dry Cheerios and Shredded Wheat (unsweetened) within reach.  No other surprises, except when I was lying in bed this morning trying to take a nap, I felt the drainage bag connection pop out loose, fall to the floor, and go all over the carpet.  Within seconds my leg was also soaking wet from the other end of the disconnected catheter.  Oh well, I was going to take my first shower this morning anyway.  Luckily, my wife hadn't quite left for the store yet, so she got to join in the fun.

Speaking of drainage bags, I gave up on the leg bag for good today.  When I got out of the shower, my wife was cleaning the overnight bag so I thought I would give the leg bag another try.  It's okay for walking around, but that's it.  You can't lay down with it, because the bag will be higher than your bladder, and sitting on a chair creates a similar backwash problem, at least for me.  Maybe it's just due to my doctor's instructions that the bag actually be placed on the thigh, i.e., above the knee, rather than around the calf?

My final experiment of the day looks like another success story: after my shower I removed the Statlock and experimented with finding a better position on my leg for it.  In the hospital the nurse had me place it more on my quad, such that there was less slack available when sitting on the toilet.  And to try to keep it from tugging me I had used surgical tape on the hose to keep everything in one spot all the time.  What I didn't realize, or failed to notice, is that the Statlock mount actually swivels on the paper backing, so taping it down was not the best idea.  Using a second Statlock that the hospital threw in my going home package, I repositioned it to be more in the inner thigh, which allowed for more slack in the line.  Also, I started using the Lanocaine they gave me at the hospital, not so much as a numbing gel, but more as a lube for where the catheter exits the penis.  The two adjustments have allowed me to stand up and sit down with less wear and tear.  Plus I used my brains for once and shaved my thigh before applying the adhesive tape.  No more screaming when the bandage comes off.

P.S.  My 11-year old came into the bedroom to kiss me goodnight.  I was already laying down, and she bent over and used my JP drain incision as a support for her left hand.  Ouch!  Poor kid, it hurt her worse than it did me.

Greg


Age 55
Physical exam (01/22/2009): blood pressure 130/85, good EKG; basically all-around healthy
PSA 4.9 (02/05/2009)
Urologist DRE observed slightly hardened left lobe (02/19/2009)
Chest X-ray normal (02/23/2009)
Biopsy (03/03/2009)
PCa present in all sextants, <5% to 50%
Prostate gland 37 grams
Gleason score 7 (in two sextants, scored 6 elsewhere)
Cystoscopy (05/08/2009), showed clear
MRI (05/08/2009), "No findings are present to suggest extracapsular tumor."
Robot-assisted (daVinci) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (05/18/2009) by Michael Esposito, M.D. and Vincent Lanteri, M.D.  Both nerve bundles spared.  Awaiting final pathology report to verify that PCa was contained within the capsule.
 
 
Research:
Surgery (daVinci robotic) consult with Michael Esposito, M.D., http://www.roboticurology.com/ (03/30/2009)
Radiation oncology (Varian IMRT/IGRT RapidArc) consult with Mark Macher, M.D., http://www.njneuro.org/fp/gammateam.asp (04/08/2009)
Other resources: Dr. Peter Scardino's Prostate Book (Peter Scardino (Sloan-Kettering), 2005); Urologic Robotic Surgery (Michael Esposito, Vincent Lanteri & Jeffrey Stock, 2007)

Post Edited (55 and healthy in NJ) : 5/22/2009 10:58:37 PM (GMT-6)


TeddyG
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 133
   Posted 5/23/2009 11:52 AM (GMT -6)   

Well, now that you are experiencing the full initiation, you are an official member of the club. You do get better with all of the devices, that's for sure and you will feel wonderful when detached. Then the next chapter: kegels, pads and leaks. One day at a time...and on to the next challenge in this journey.

Best wishes,

TeddyG


Background:
Age 55, two teens, very fit cyclist (avg 2000+ miles per year) and weight, diet, etc. consistent with good habits. Stressful job as attorney; very supporting wife who is helping me through every stage of this war.
Stats:
2006 PSA - 1.5
2007 PSA - 2.3
2008 PSA - 5.3 (18 mos.)
2009 Jan. 20 - Biopsy 12 samples
        Feb 3 Dx 2/12 samples positive, low volume  (5% and 7-10%)
Gleason 3+4, later downgraded by second opinion at Johns-Hopkins to 3+3, but "it's still PCa" as my Doc said.
Laproscopic surgery April 9,  University of KY Medical Center, Lexington, 3 days in hospital, catheter removal April 21.
Pathology: clear margins, no cancer in prostate: told that this is very rare and Doc has only seen it in 3 out of over 1400 cases; I rearched the concept of "vanishing cancer" and found a tumor classification of tP0 and asked Doc if it applied to me. He said that it was unlikely because if a pathologist had done a much more detailed analysis of the tissue, he would likely find more foci somewhere, and biopsy found "needle in the haystack as opposed to the tip of the iceberg"; Nevertheless, it is a blessing;
Regardless of the science, my family says "miracle."
Now working w/ post-surgery issues....
 


CPA
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 655
   Posted 5/23/2009 7:58 PM (GMT -6)   

Greetings, Greg.  Glad you are making such good progress.  As bad as it seems, I remember nearly every experience you are having and I survived.  I think most of us here had most of these symptoms.  I agree with you on the leg bag.  I wore it once and then vowed just to use the big bag. After that first time, the only other time I wore the leg bag was to go to the doc's office to have the catheter removed.  Also, codene affected me the same way - constipation.  I think you are on the right track with the extra strength tylenol. 

My JP drains (I had two I think) were removed by a student nurse.  My wife and son are both nurses so I have always been aware of the training that nurses need.  So, when they asked if it would be ok if the student removed the drain I said sure.  It was going to hurt anyway so why not let her have a little experience.

By the way, I know what you mean about losing your dignity.  When I went to have my catheter removed the nurse handed me a 2' by 2' sterile sheet.  I asked her what that was for and she said that is your modesty panel.  I said "Mam, I lost all modesty 2 months ago with the biopsy and it has been downhill ever since." 

Keep up the good progress and please do let us know how things are going.  David


Age 55
Diagnosed Dec 2007 during annual routine physical
PSA doubled from previous year from 1.5 to 3.2
12 biopsies - 2 positive with 2 marginal
Gleason 3 + 3 = 6
RRP 4 Feb 08
Both nerves spared
Good pathology - no margins - all encapsulated - Gleason 4 + 3 = 7
Catheter out Feb 13 - wore pad for couple of days - pad free Feb 16
PSA every 90 days - ZERO's everytime!
Great wife and family who take very good care of me


Cajun Jeff
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 4106
   Posted 5/23/2009 8:30 PM (GMT -6)   
Greg: I'm glad you are makeing the progress. One question. What is modesty? I told my wife that in the initial process I pulled my pants down more that a ****** on Burgon Street. Good luck and welcome to the other side.

Jeff
Jeff T Age 57
9/08 PSA 5.4, referred to Urologist
9/08 Biopsy: GS 3/4=7
10/08 Nerve sparing open RRP- Path Report: GS 3+3=7 Stg. pT2c, margins clear
3 mts: PSA .05 undetectable
 ED- 5 mg Cialis daily, pump daily,


geezer99
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 5/24/2009 11:42 AM (GMT -6)   
Great news about your progress! Some leakage around the catheter, including a bit of blood, is par for the course. Remember that your bladder has been relocated so it is now easier for a BM to press on it as it comes out.

I could give up laxatives as soon as things got moving, but I kept on with stool softeners for about four more days just to be sure that I wasn't straining anything. It sounds like you are getting to be a real pro at living with a cath, this happens to many of us and we are filled with a sense of loss when they take it out. (If you believe this, please contact me privately because I can offer you a great deal on the purchase of the Brooklyn Bridge.)

Here are some memories of when my catheter came out. The first day or so I leaked a lot and all the time and it was so depressing that I didn't know how I could stand it. The first two nights I was up to the bathroom so many times that I hardly got any sleep. By the third day things were better, some control during the day and up only twice a night. I spent a while always attentive to where the nearest bathroom was. On the fourth day I was confident enough to drive to pick up our son at college -- one and a half hours each way with a pit stop at each end and halfway through.

The experience of others varies widely, but remember that you are recovering and you will be seeing regular improvement.
Age at diagnosis 66, PSA 5.5
Biopsy 12/08 12 cores, 8 positive
Gleason 3 + 4 = 7
CAT scan 1/09 negative, Bone scan 1/09 negative

Robotic surgery 03/03/09 Catheter Removed 03/08/09
Post surgical pathology report. Lymph nodes negative, Seminal vesicles negative
Surgical margins positive, Capsular penetration extensive Gleason 4 + 3 = 7
At 6 weeks: 1 pad/day, 1 pad/night -- mostly dry at night.


55 and healthy in NJ
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 5/28/2009 5:45 PM (GMT -6)   
5/28/2009 UPDATE
 
Sorry this update is later than I wanted to post it, but I was hoping to have the pathology report by now.  Anyway, I want to capture the last days of the catheter before it fades from my memory.
 
Following my GI successes last Friday, I started having some real solid food.  Nothing heavy and still including the prunes on the menu.  At this point my weekend from hell began in earnest.  Here I was thinking I have solved all my problems midway through Catheter Week, and little did I know the worst was yet to come.  Actually, there was not one, not two, but three miserable events that completely demoralized me and ruined the entire weekend:
 
1.  First, the burning sensation in my urethra at the penis end was not only continuing on Saturday, it was getting worse.  No matter what I did to minimize any bowel movement straining, the pains were increasing in severity.  I tried pressing against my lower abs, upping the stool softener amount, even wrapping the little guy with a cold washcloth.  Nothing worked.  I became convinced that whatever straining was taking place, no matter how minimal, it was causing the balloon inside the bladder to move just enough to allow some extra urine to escape via the urethra, and by doing so it started irritating the urethra, thereby causing the extreme burning sensation.  And I do mean extreme.  There were screams coming out of my own voice that I hadn't heard ever.  So I figured I would dilute the urine best as I could, and I must have drunk about 40 ounces of water in less than a minute.  Now it was just a matter of time for the water to make it through my kidneys and into my bladder, so I laid down on the bed to watch for all this liquid to appear through the drainage tube, which led directly to the . . .
 
2.  . . . second main event of the weekend.  It didn't take that long for the water to make its appearance at the other end, and I was mighty impressed with the speed of the liquid through the tubing on its way to the drainage bag.  I had purposely placed the bag within an easy line of sight, and I watched the water go into the bag at full speed just like a toilet getting flushed.  As the last bit of it went into the bag all of a sudden WHAM! my penis felt like somebody had whacked it with a broom!  On my way back down to the bed (i.e., from the ceiling), I'm thinking what the blank just happened?  It took a few more whacks before I figured it out:  the catheter-and-tubing is a "closed system" meaning nothing can get in or out unless it originates from the bladder.  Except that when it's first connected the tubing is filled with air, which has to go someplace when the urine shows up.  So here I had 40 ounces flowing  rapidly through an essentially vertical tubing, and the liquid can only flow if it trades space in the tube with the air that's already there.  Meaning the faster the water flows, the faster the "wall of air" flows back in the opposite direction, thus creating the WHAM! effect.  I'm not an engineer, but I figured out that if I used the clip that came with the drainage bag and attached it to the bedsheet, that would help control the rate of descent.  I went ahead and added two clothespins to get a controlled decline to the bag, and once I did that the problem didn't recur.
 
3.  The third event was unrelated but painful nevertheless.  The center incision at the navel, and the one where the JP drain was, kept pulling at me.  It was worse if I tried to change position to sleep on my left side, as the little belly gut I had would roll over to the side and pull all the incisions along for the ride.  I swear the only relief I had for the whole week was if I stood up straight.  I decided I would invent a bed that stands upright, with leg clamps etc. to hold you in place.  It would be the only way to get a good night's sleep following the surgery.
 
Sunday comes and goes, with more screaming (see #1 above).  Finally it's Monday, one week since the surgery and I can go get the stupid catheter removed, and --- oh blast, it's Memorial Day Monday and the place is closed.  I have to suffer for another 24 hours.  Monday night I couldn't sleep for all the excitement of the Tuesday 9:00 am appointment.  I have never looked forward so much to seeing the doctor as I did on Tuesday.  Of course that's the day he's up north, so the nurse in the local office had to take care of me.  At this point I don't care, I just want the darn thing out, privacy sheet or no privacy sheet.  First she cuts out the four sets of incision staples and then she fills up my bladder --- backwards --- for the main event.  It seems I hadn't drunk enough water that morning, so she undoes the catheter connection, connects some sort of a graduated funnel, and starts pouring away.  When I think my bladder is full enough she tells me to stand up and give it the Kegel (stop-start-stop-start) test, which to my surprise I did without a problem.  And thus it was time to say goodbye to the catheter and hello to the pads and diapers --- my new friends.
 
In the hospital my doctor warned me to drink like crazy the day the catheter came out, in order to avoid any inflammation happening, which would cause the urethra to close up.  I got that message loud and clear, and I spent the rest of Tuesday racing back and forth between the sink and the toilet.  I didn't think of it at the time, but I suppose I could have brought in a 25-foot garden hose from outside and used that as a transfer line and just sat in one spot comfortably all day.  Needless to say, the pads didn't last very long, so I went with the diapers (Depends for Men) the rest of the day.
 
So now it's Thursday, a/k/a "Surgery +10" and "Catheter Removal +2".  I'm doing everything I can to control the leakage, but that requires me to consciously work my sphincter which translates to muscle soreness in the abdomen.  And the burning sensation in the urethra is still there although much greatly reduced from a few days ago.  And the pain around the incisions is still there, and now when I look at the incisions, I'm wondering whether the staples came out too soon, because the healing seems to have a way to go yet. Tomorrow (Friday) morning, my doctor is supposed to call me with the pathology report, and I'll ask him what happens next, since I didn't get any going home instructions when they took the catheter out.  E.g., when can I start driving, when can I start lifting heavy objects, what specifically do I need to do to get my continence back, and gee whiz, can I get that prescription for the Viagra already?  Therapy is therapy.
 
Greg
 
P.S.  Thanks again to everyone for their supportive words of wisdom -- it means a lot when stuff happens in the middle of the night, and it's always comforting to know you're not alone. 

Age 55
10/15/2004 PSA 2.9
12/14/2005 PSA 3.7
11/20/2007 PSA 2.79
01/22/2009 Physical exam:
   blood pressure 130/85
   EKG good
   basically all-around healthy
01/23/2009 PSA 4.54
02/05/2009 PSA 4.9
02/19/2009 Urologist DRE observed slightly hardened left lobe
02/23/2009 Chest X-ray normal
03/03/2009 Biopsy:
    PCa present in all sextants, <5% to 50%
    Prostate gland 37 grams
    Gleason score 7 (in two sextants, 6 elsewhere)
03/30/2009 Surgery consult (see below)
04/08/2009 Radiation consult (see below)
04/16/2009 Decision made - surgery course selected
05/08/2009 Cystoscopy, showed clear
05/08/2009 MRI, "No findings are present to suggest extracapsular tumor."
05/13/2009 pre-op EKG good
05/18/2009 Robot-assisted (daVinci) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by Michael Esposito, M.D. and Vincent Lanteri, M.D.:
    Both nerve bundles spared
    Lymph nodes clear
05/26/2009 Catheter and incision staples removed
Awaiting final pathology report to verify that PCa was contained within the capsule.
 
 
Research:
Surgery (daVinci robotic) consult with Michael Esposito, M.D., http://www.roboticurology.com/ (03/30/2009)
Radiation oncology (Varian IMRT/IGRT RapidArc) consult with Mark Macher, M.D., http://www.njneuro.org/fp/gammateam.asp (04/08/2009)
Other resources: Dr. Peter Scardino's Prostate Book (Peter Scardino (Sloan-Kettering), 2005); Urologic Robotic Surgery (Michael Esposito, Vincent Lanteri & Jeffrey Stock, 2007)


DS Can
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 5/28/2009 8:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Hey Greg,
 
I hope that these post-catheter days get better for you.  Pretty soon you it will be a distant memory.  I tend to forget a lot of the bad things as time goes on.
When the nurse yanked out my catheter I was in a lot of pain.  She gave me some topical lidocaine to apply.  This helped the pain.  I was able to confiscate the remainder of the stuff when leaving the dr. office.  It came in handy quite a few times over the course of the next week and a half or so.   I also had a zinging sensation when urinating.  It lasted for over 5 weeks, sometimes not as bad as others.  I still get a level of discomfort for a few minutes after urinating sometimes.  I mentioned it to the uro today and he was not concerned.  It is getting better for me on a week by week basis.  Try not to focus on day to day changes.
 
Hope your pathology report is all good.
DS
PSA 01/07 was 1.2, PSA 01/08 was 1.9, PSA 01/09 was 2.5.
BIOPSY 02/24/09, adenocarcinoma DX at age 52
 Right:GS 3+3=6, tumor 3/6 cores, 10% involvement,PNI-Yes
 Left: GS 3+3=6, tumor 1/7 cores, <5% involvement,PNI-No
LARP 04/09/09,nerve sparing. Final pathology:
 GS 3+4=7, Margins uninvolved, 2 lymph nodes negative.
Catheter removed on 04/17. First no-pad day was 05/03.
ED treatment is 25 mg Viagra nightly.
First followup PSA results on 05/28/09: <0.1,undetectable!
 
 


John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4225
   Posted 5/29/2009 9:34 AM (GMT -6)   

Greg,

What a great detailed narritive; just glad I didn't have to go through it.

My seeds took 3 hours from the time I left home to the time I got back. I've been playing golf everyday since the 3rd day. The radiation must have affected something as I shot my two lowest scores ever last week. The only issue is frequency and a little buring when I urinate.

Glad to see you are improving.

JT


55 and healthy in NJ
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 58
   Posted 5/29/2009 12:01 PM (GMT -6)   
*** BEST POSSIBLE NEWS ***
 
My doctor called this morning with the results of the surgical pathology:
 
    NO EXTRA-CAPSULAR INVASION
   
    NO TUMOR PRESENT IN THE LYMPH NODES
 
    NEGATIVE SURGICAL MARGIN
 
Even after going through all the testing and the surgery, and knowing the odds were in my favor, I was still jittery waiting for the pathology report.  That is one of the main advantages of surgery, being able to examine the prostate under a microscope.  I am so lucky to have had the best doctors watching over me, from my GP to my urologist to my surgeons, and all I want is for my luck to rub off on everyone else on this forum.  You guys are the greatest!
 
Looking forward to the first of many PSA zeros!
 
Best to all,
Greg

Age 55
10/15/2004 PSA 2.9
12/14/2005 PSA 3.7
11/20/2007 PSA 2.79
01/22/2009 Physical exam:
   blood pressure 130/85
   EKG good
   basically all-around healthy
01/23/2009 PSA 4.54
02/05/2009 PSA 4.9
02/19/2009 Urologist DRE observed slightly hardened left lobe
02/23/2009 Chest X-ray normal
03/03/2009 Biopsy:
    PCa present in all sextants, <5% to 50%
    Prostate gland 37 grams
    Gleason score 7 (in two sextants, 6 elsewhere)
03/30/2009 Surgery consult (see below)
04/08/2009 Radiation consult (see below)
04/16/2009 Decision made - surgery course selected
05/08/2009 Cystoscopy, showed clear
05/08/2009 MRI, "No findings are present to suggest extracapsular tumor."
05/13/2009 pre-op EKG good
05/18/2009 Robot-assisted (daVinci) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by Michael Esposito, M.D. and Vincent Lanteri, M.D. - both nerve bundles spared
05/19/2009 Surgical Pathology:
    Prostate gland 51.8 grams
    Gleason score 3+3=6
    Pathologic stage T2c, N0, Mx
    Left/Right Pelvic lymph nodes clear (no tumor present)
    No presence of extra-capsular invasion
    No margin involvement
05/26/2009 Catheter and incision staples removed
 
 
Research:
Surgery (daVinci robotic) consult with Michael Esposito, M.D., http://www.roboticurology.com/ (03/30/2009)
Radiation oncology (Varian IMRT/IGRT RapidArc) consult with Mark Macher, M.D., http://www.njneuro.org/fp/gammateam.asp (04/08/2009)
Other resources: Dr. Peter Scardino's Prostate Book (Peter Scardino (Sloan-Kettering), 2005); Urologic Robotic Surgery (Michael Esposito, Vincent Lanteri & Jeffrey Stock, 2007)


DS Can
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 195
   Posted 5/31/2009 6:42 PM (GMT -6)   
That is great news Greg.
See ya in the zero line real soon!
DS

PSA 01/07 was 1.2, PSA 01/08 was 1.9, PSA 01/09 was 2.5.
BIOPSY 02/24/09, adenocarcinoma DX at age 52
 Right:GS 3+3=6, tumor 3/6 cores, 10% involvement,PNI-Yes
 Left: GS 3+3=6, tumor 1/7 cores, <5% involvement,PNI-No
LARP 04/09/09,nerve sparing. Final pathology:
 GS 3+4=7, Margins uninvolved, 2 lymph nodes negative.
Catheter removed on 04/17. First no-pad day was 05/03.
ED treatment is 25 mg Viagra nightly.
First followup PSA results on 05/28/09: <0.1,undetectable!
 
 

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