When, if at all, do you tell a prospective employer you have PCa?

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Geebra
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 476
   Posted 10/9/2009 9:33 AM (GMT -6)   
Do I tell them before I get hired? How about after? Not at all? I am uneasy about this. Feels like lying to me...

Paul1959
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2007
Total Posts : 598
   Posted 10/9/2009 9:47 AM (GMT -6)   
Do not tell them at all, would be my advice. Unless you see it adversely affecting your work performance, it has no bearing on anything. If, on the other hand, you are going to be out 2 days a month for chemo or treatment, then that should be mentioned. However, there are labor laws involved here. It can get complicated - It it will not affect your performance, you are fine. You have the medical leave act on your side if you eventually need to take time off for acute situations.

This is a job, not a marriage. You do not need to bare your entire life to someone.
just my 2 cents
Paul
46 at Diagnosis.
Father died of Pca 4/07 at 86.
10/07 PSA 5.06 (Biopsy 11/07 1 of 12 with 8% involvment) (1mm)
Da Vinci surgery Jan 5, '08 at Mt. Sinai Hosp. NYC www.roboticoncology.com
Saved both nerve bundles.
Path Report: Stage T2cNxMx
-Gleason (3+3)6
Pad free on March 14 - (10 weeks.) Never a problem since.
ED - at one year, ED is fine with viagra.
One year PSA - undectable!

ED Website: www.FrankTalk.org - frank discussions of Erectile Dysfunction - check it out.


geezer99
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:01 AM (GMT -6)   
Will it affect your ability to do the job? Ok, it might mean some time for doctor’s visits but so might diabetes, asthma, or hemorrhoids or diseases that a person doesn’t even know they have. So don’t tell. In fact, they probably don’t want to know because of anti-discrimination laws – they are much safer with no knowledge. The one exception would be a job where passing a physical was a condition of employment like airline pilot or Navy seal. I never tell that my great-great grandfather was a horse thief even though I believe that the trait may be hereditary (fortunately, my present employer doesn’t own any horses.)

Oh, one thing, if the job is leading man in ****o pictures it might be worth bringing up. But if you can bring it up for the audition I suppose that even then it doesn't matter.
Age at diagnosis 66, PSA 5.5
Biopsy 12/08 12 cores, 8 positive
Gleason 3+4=7
CAT scan, Bone scan 1/09 both negative.

Robotic surgery 03/03/09 Catheter Out 03/08/09
Pathology: Lymph nodes & Seminal vesicles negative
Margins positive, Capsular penetration extensive Gleason 4+3=7
6 weeks: 1 pad/day, 1 pad/night -- mostly dry at night.
10 weeks: no pad at night -- slight leakage day/1 pad.
3 mo. PSA 0.0 - now light pads


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:03 AM (GMT -6)   
You are clearly protected by federal and state laws concerning this. Most company's are tolerant to a point, but from personal experience, they can find "other" ways to get rid of you if you become a medical liability to them. I wouldn't disclose anything, unless it directly involves taking off large amounts of time, or time off on a regular basis.
Age: 57, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 7/08 12.3, 9/08 14.5, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 - 7/7 Positive, 40-90% Cancer, Gleason 4+3
Open RP: 11/08, Rht nerves saved, 4 days in hospt, on catheters for 63 days, 5th one out 1/09
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos margin
Post Surgery  PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Latest: 7/09 met 2 rad. oncl, 7/09 cath #6 - blockage, 8/9 2nd corr surgery, 8/9 cath #7 - out  38 days, 9/14/9 - met 3rd rad. oncl.agree to start radiation, mapping on 9/21/9, 9/24 - mtg with uro/surg, 9/29- pre-op, 10/1 - 3rd corr. surgery - suprapubic cath/hard dialation, 10/5 - first treatment IMRT.


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:03 AM (GMT -6)   
For me it was a couple months before I was hired by my present employer. But I can speak for the yin and the yang of it. At my old job where I worked 16 years, they under went a complete change out of the management during my diagnosis and I told the new boss and she told me that this was a place of business and if I could not perform at the highest level then I needed to go out on disability. That was it, there was no compassion. I resigned as I was in fear still and I didn't want that kind of stress. I had never had less that a 5 star review of my work.

Now back to the yin.

about two months later, execs from the current employer came to me and asked if I would come on and help them develop the Las Vegas market for them. I told them about my condition and that I was scheduled for surgery. They waited. Then they came back to me two months later. I told them about my advanced disease and that I would begin my radiation soon and that would not be fair to them that I come on with this heavy load and be less than 100%. They said they wanted me to start immediately and that if I needed take time for therapy, that it was fine with them. I was almost brought to tears by their compassion. I am loyal to them and have been given levity to travel and work in my charities and advocacy projects.

Two quite different reactions. This decision to tell both is in my honesty. I knew I would be affecting my status but I also knew I had to let them know since it would affect my ability to travel and perform at a level that I set for a standard for myself. And it would be obvious if I hadn't told them.

Like a treatment choice, this will be very unique for anyone in this forum who is employed by another. I pray that they get the reaction of my second employer. But it could be risky for many.

Tony
 Age 47 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Gleason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 11, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:16 AM (GMT -6)   
Just a note on that story I told about my current employer, I was able to work a schedule with my doctors that had me in at 7:00am for daily radiation. I was home by 8:0oam and I walked 3 to 4 miles daily after treatment. I started work by 9:15. Since I was opening a new market, I worked from my home office. I still do. My insurance never lapsed due to selecting COBRA, and my company provisioned for pre-existing conditions so my insurance kicked in immediately and I cancelled COBRA. My company's insurance absorbed all that Casodex and Lupron, and never waivered on the radiation therapy.

I still am very thankful...

Tony
 Age 47 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Gleason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 11, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:19 AM (GMT -6)   
Tony that is a rare company that would do all that ,glad it worked well for you and your case.
Age: 57, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 7/08 12.3, 9/08 14.5, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 - 7/7 Positive, 40-90% Cancer, Gleason 4+3
Open RP: 11/08, Rht nerves saved, 4 days in hospt, on catheters for 63 days, 5th one out 1/09
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos margin
Post Surgery  PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Latest: 7/09 met 2 rad. oncl, 7/09 cath #6 - blockage, 8/9 2nd corr surgery, 8/9 cath #7 - out  38 days, 9/14/9 - met 3rd rad. oncl.agree to start radiation, mapping on 9/21/9, 9/24 - mtg with uro/surg, 9/29- pre-op, 10/1 - 3rd corr. surgery - suprapubic cath/hard dialation, 10/5 - first treatment IMRT.


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:38 AM (GMT -6)   
David, I know that I was very lucky. I was out of work for 5 months when I finally signed up. Pretty expensive COBRA, but imaging no COBRA and surgery with all that follow up. I wasn't making as much as I did with the old employer, but I am quite happier. Being in Sales, it took over a year to build my commissions to the level I had before. I still lost a home in the foreclosure saturated market in Vegas, but I am doing well in my cancer journey. And I am working in a market where there is 1500 applicants for any job openings. (Vegas is near Detroit in unemployment)

Tony
 Age 47 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Gleason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 11, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


engineer55
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 121
   Posted 10/9/2009 11:10 AM (GMT -6)   
I am actually self employed, but I told no one professionally about it, only family.  24 hour hosptial stay, so not a problem.  You tell a future employer and you won't get hired would be my opinion
Dx'ed 5/08 one core 2%  out of 12  3+3 gleason
DREs all negative
PSA was in the 3-4 range then jumped to 7
I have the enlarged prostate, on the order of 100cc.  After taking Avodart for 3 months  my
PSA was cut in half.
I did Active S for a year but concluded that I didn't want a life
of biopsies and Uro meetings.
DaVinci on 6/24/09  UCI Med Center  Dr Ahlering, long surgery based on size and location
Final was 5% one side all clear, but had a huge 90 grm prostate
Now we work on pee control, ok at night but sitting is a big problem.


Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/9/2009 11:29 AM (GMT -6)   
Be careful though.

On the application it asks if there is any physical condition that may prevent you from doing your work as hired. If you are confident that you are good to go, it should not be a reason to not hire you that you were treated and have done well. But it could be a reason to let you go that you failed to disclose a health issue. And failing to disclose a pre-existing condition can also be a problem if you are receiving health benefits.

This is a great thread and it peels back the banana on real life cancer survival.

Tony
 Age 47 (44 when Dx)
Pre-op PSA was 19.8 : Surgery at The City of Hope on February 16, 2007
Gleason 4+3=7, Stage pT3b, N0, Mx
Positive Margins (PM), Extra Prostatic Extension (EPE) : Bilateral Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI)
HT began in May, '07 with Lupron and Casodex 50mg (2 Year ADT)
IMRT radiation for 38 Treatments ending August 3, '07
Current PSA (May 11, 2009): <0.1
 
My Journal is at Tony's Blog  
 
STAY POSITIVE!


Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 4183
   Posted 10/9/2009 12:18 PM (GMT -6)   

Dear Geebra:

As others have mentioned, it is only lying if you do not disclose something that will impact your job performance.  Assuming you will be able to do the job without the PCa getting in the way, there is no reason to disclose.  And, why would you want to give anyone a reason, however subtle, to not hire you?

However, recognize that you might need to divulge the issue after being hired, depending on what questions are asked when you sign up for the health insurance...and you should, of course, be truthful if asked the question in that situation.

If you are still uncomfortable after all of us armchair lawyers have given our advice, maybe this is something you might run by your family attorney...

Tudpock


Age 62, Gleason 4 +3 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2 of 16 cores cancerous, 27cc
Brachytherapy December 9, 2008.  73 Iodine-125 seeds.  Procedure went great, catheter out before I went home, only minor discomfort.  Regular activities resumed, everything continues to function normally as of 9/1/09.  6 month PSA  1.4 and my docs are "delighted"!

riverbend
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 39
   Posted 10/9/2009 12:39 PM (GMT -6)   

I think it is a gut call based on a lot of factors.  You sort of get a feel from people if they may hold something against you.  It probably depends on how old you are...most people facing PCa are old enough to also be facing some age discrimination in the workplace.  It may be more subtle than obvious, but if you are in your 50's and 60's and looking for a job you probably really feel like you have a battle on your hands from the start.

In my case, I was unemployed while I was being treated....most of the jobs I applied for were out of town.  I made a decision to be up front and tell people what I was dealing with...if they wanted to interview me, we would have to compromise and pick a date that worked for them and for my radiation schedule as well.  I really got the feeling that most people understood and were accommodating...but maybe I got lucky.  Maybe part of my thinking was that I did not want to work for anyone who would hold my PCa against me...if I told someone that I had PCa and that was a factor in them not hiring me, I probably don't want to work for that boss/company anyway.


Dx T1c in April, 2009 at 45 years old after recent PSA tests ranged from 2.93-3.25
2 of 14 cores positive at 5% and Gleason 3+3... 2 cores taken from a "protuberance" were "ASAP"
Proton radiation at LLMC May-June 2009


Paralleli
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 123
   Posted 10/9/2009 3:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Draw your own conclusions......


From: The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

"Discussing Disability with the Potential Employer

The ADA prohibits employers from asking questions that are likely to reveal the existence of a disability before making a job offer (i.e., the pre-offer period). This prohibition covers written questionnaires and inquiries made during interviews, as well as medical examinations. However, such questions and medical examinations are permitted after extending a job offer but before the individual begins work (i.e., the post-offer period).

9. What are examples of questions that an employer cannot ask on an application or during an interview?

Examples of prohibited questions during the pre-offer period include:

Do you have a heart condition? Do you have asthma or any other difficulties breathing?
Do you have a disability which would interfere with your ability to perform the job?
How many days were you sick last year?
Have you ever filed for workers' compensation? Have you ever been injured on the job?
Have you ever been treated for mental health problems?
What prescription drugs are you currently taking?"
@ 53 yrs PSA 4.8
T1c – Gleason 3 + 3
IMRT 1/07 thru 2/07 (42 treatments)
PSA 6/07 – 0.76
PSA 12/07 – 0.36
PSA 6/08 – 0.72
PSA 12/08 - 1.06
PSA 6/09 - 1.02


CPA
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 655
   Posted 10/9/2009 3:16 PM (GMT -6)   

Greetings, everyone.  Good discussion.  I'm not an attorney, but I feel confident that there are federal and state laws that govern (limit) what a perspective employer may ask.  You then have to decide what information you may or may not decide to volunteer.  In my case, I have been employed by the same company for 23 years.  When my diagnosis was confirmed, I immediately let my closest colleagues at work know - that includes my boss who is the CEO of our organization.  about a week later I informed all the people that worked directly with me.  Finally, at our next board meeting, I told our full board.  As CFO and an officer of the corporation, I had an obligation to let our board know. Everyone - boss, colleagues, co-workers, and board were absolutely supportive. 

I was glad I shared with all of them - worked out well for me.  David 


Diagnosed Dec 2007 during annual routine physical at age 55
PSA doubled from previous year from 1.5 to 3.2
12 biopsies - 2 pos; 2 marginal
Gleason 3+3; upgraded to 4+3 post surgery
RRP 4 Feb 08; both nerves spared
Good pathology - no margins - all encapsulated
Catheter out Feb 13 - pad free Feb 16
PSA every 90 days - ZERO's everytime!
Great wife and family who take very good care of me


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 10/9/2009 3:40 PM (GMT -6)   
As usual, anything to do with PC is such a mix bag, look at the reaction and results of what started out to be a simple question.

Ohio, hate to hurt your feelings, but most employees wouldn't trust their employer with such job ending news, nothing againts you or your sense of honor or fairness. Too many employees cut off and thrown out in the cold.

David CPA - in your case, having been a CFO a time or two, you are in a critical operational position with your firm, and I would have dislose what was needed too. Each case is different.

When I had cancer in the past, and it involved mutiple surgeries, radiation, and physical therapy, my supportive company who was self insured dropped me like a hot rivet. Seven years of hard work down the drain, they couldn't fire me for any legitimate reason or lay me off for health reasons, so they eliminated my entire department which I headed a six state operation. The only department laid off interestingly. SC is a right to work state and you end up not having too many rights as an employee. I worked every single day I was on the brutal head/neck old school radiaton, never missed a single day, kept up with all my work, employees, and obligations. I was just too big a liability to them.

On the other end, the small firm I was working for when I was laid off last year was too small to require COBRA, the state of SC did however require my former employer to offer my health insurance for 6 months. My dx for pc was one month after I was laid off, and yet my former boss not only offered the extended insurance, but paid the premiums for me during that time, to make sure that I could get my operation on schedule and without financial complications.

It so hit and miss out there. Its just like everything else about PC, you end up having to make tough choices. But a person should know their federal and state job protection laws well before spilling the beans in my opinion.

David in SC
Age: 57, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 7/08 12.3, 9/08 14.5, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 - 7/7 Positive, 40-90% Cancer, Gleason 4+3
Open RP: 11/08, Rht nerves saved, 4 days in hospt, on catheters for 63 days, 5th one out 1/09
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos margin
Post Surgery  PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Latest: 7/09 met 2 rad. oncl, 7/09 cath #6 - blockage, 8/9 2nd corr surgery, 8/9 cath #7 - out  38 days, 9/14/9 - met 3rd rad. oncl.agree to start radiation, mapping on 9/21/9, 9/24 - mtg with uro/surg, 9/29- pre-op, 10/1 - 3rd corr. surgery - suprapubic cath/hard dialation, 10/5 - first treatment IMRT.


Worried Guy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 3734
   Posted 10/9/2009 4:30 PM (GMT -6)   
I am ashamed to admit it but I still haven't told the guys I work with that I had a "difficult" summer. I blamed my inability to attend social functions on my wife's recent back injury.

Engineer. I'm self employed too and don't want clients to be thinking that they are paying for me to change my pads.

It's out in the open here! But I refuse to come out of the closet in the real world.

goodlife
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 2691
   Posted 10/9/2009 5:14 PM (GMT -6)   
I say there is no right or wrong answer here. It's whatever you feel comfortable with. What is honesty ? If I am adked if I ever had cancer, then I say yes. If I am not asked, I don't say anything usually. Is that dishonest ? I don't think so.

Obviously if we are stage 4 and not expected to live long, that is one thing, but if we are able to function well, then it is not really relevant.

Heck, at our ages, some of us have a lot of history that we don't need to or want to divulge, for many reasons.

This is one time when I am glad to be self employed, but I wouldn't expect my new employees to tell me unless it will casue a problem.
Age 58, PSA 4.47 Biopsy - 2/12 cores , Gleason 4 + 5 = 9
Da Vinci, Cleveland Clinic  4/14/09   Nerves spared, but carved up a little.
0/23 lymph nodes involved  pT3a NO MX
Catheter and 2 stints in ureters for 2 weeks due to anatomical issues with location of ureters with respect to bladder neck.  Try 3 tubes where no tubes are supposed to be for 2 weeks !
Neg Margins, bladder neck negative
Living the Good Life, cancer free  6 week PSA  <.03
3 month PSA <.01 (different lab)
5 month PSA <.03 (undetectable)


Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 4183
   Posted 10/9/2009 7:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Dear Ohio:
 
Two things:
 
1.  I don't personally think this is an issue of honesty but is about relevancy.  If the fact that an individual is a PCa survivor is relevant to the new job then by all means it should be divulged.  If not, why would someone bring it into the conversation?  It's great that "men were men" in your profession, but you are naive if you don't understand that there can be subtle discrimination against cancer survivors in today's economy.
 
2.  Why do you keep slamming David and the frequency of his postings?  He has offered you a perfectly legitimate solution, i.e. block them if you don't want to read them but, IMHO, the constancy of your complaints is starting to sound very childish and whiny...
 
Tudpock
Age 62, Gleason 4 +3 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2 of 16 cores cancerous, 27cc
Brachytherapy December 9, 2008.  73 Iodine-125 seeds.  Procedure went great, catheter out before I went home, only minor discomfort.  Regular activities resumed, everything continues to function normally as of 9/1/09.  6 month PSA  1.4 and my docs are "delighted"!

Geebra
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 476
   Posted 10/9/2009 7:38 PM (GMT -6)   
First, thanks to all of you for your many good points and thoughts. Geezer - as always - you crack me up, thanks. I think my feelings reflect all responses here (yes I know they are contradictory). So, to make it more real and less conceptual, here is my situation.

When I had my first encounter with the cancer a couple of years ago, I told everyone at work and I am glad I did - they were very supportive and compassionate. Then this year I had a re-occurrence. I am 8 SRT treatments away from completing my salvage radiation course. I feel fine and had felt fine even through the neo-adjuvant chemo, so I don't expect my condition to effect my performance any time soon (other than an occasional visit to the doctor). I told my employer of my re-occurrence and they were understanding. I did not feel the same degree of compassion, but they are treating me as well as others.

I am 48, in good health (except for PCa), a technology executive for one of the large US banks. In the recent crisis, the bank faired less well than others and there are a lot of changes in progress. I am still employed, but due to restructuring, I have to choose between being demoted or taking a package. So, while I am pondering the question of whether or not to take a package (pretty generous - 6 months of salary plus benefits), I get invited for an interview with a large UK financial firm. The job would re-locate me to London. I had a first interview that went very well and getting ready for a second one next week. As you might imagine, there are a lot of questions in my head. Maybe you guys can help me put it in perspective.

1. (The one already discussed at some length) When is it appropriate to tell the new employer?
2. How is it going to effect my medical coverage? What am I looking for as far as coverage in London?
3. Others, that have to do with taxation, pay, cost of living, etc, that I dont think are appropriate for this forum (but if anybody has a good insight into this, I'd love to talk off line).

This forum has always been a source of great support. This time is not an exception. I already got a lot of good thoughts from you guys - as always - thanks a lot!

Greg

Father died from poorly differentiated PCa @ 78 - normal PSA and DRE

5 biopsies over 4 years negative while PSA going from 3.8 to 28

Dx Nov 2007, age 46, PSA 29, Gleason 4+4=8

Decided to participate in clinical trial at Duke - 6 rounds of chemo (Taxotere+Avastin)

PSA prior to treatment on 1/8/2008 is 33.90, bounced on 1/31/2008 to 38.20, and down at the end of the treatment (4/24/2008) to 20.60

RRP at Duke (Dr. Moul) on 6/16/2008, Gleason downgraded 4+3=7, T3a N0MX, focal extraprostatic extension, two small positive margins

PSA undetectable for 8 months, then 2/6/2009-0.10, 4/26/2009-0.17, 5/22/2009-0.20, 6/11/2009-0.27

Salvage IMRT + 6 Months ADT: Casodex started 6/12/2009, Lupron 6/22/2009, PSA 6/25/2009-0.1, T=516, 7/23/2009-<0.05, T<10, IMRT to start mid-Aug


geezer99
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 10/9/2009 8:37 PM (GMT -6)   
Greg
Quite a number of years ago, the firm that I was with was expanding into England and was worried about pay equity. We were paying engineers and systems analysts at British market which was less than we were paying in the US. Our analysis showed that it had to do with the standard of living expectations. A British professional just didn’t live the same life style as an American. I got a taste of this while working for two and a half years in Hungary. We had a two bedroom in-town apartment rather than a four bedroom suburban house. We had only one car and mostly rode public transportation. Our food was less expensive and when we ate out it was with locals rather than tourists. When we vacationed with Hungarians we were well off, but our vacation in Rome was two adults and two kids in one room and a bathroom down the hall. Overall we loved it and enjoyed being part of the native culture and would go back again.
Age at diagnosis 66, PSA 5.5
Biopsy 12/08 12 cores, 8 positive
Gleason 3+4=7
CAT scan, Bone scan 1/09 both negative.

Robotic surgery 03/03/09 Catheter Out 03/08/09
Pathology: Lymph nodes & Seminal vesicles negative
Margins positive, Capsular penetration extensive Gleason 4+3=7
6 weeks: 1 pad/day, 1 pad/night -- mostly dry at night.
10 weeks: no pad at night -- slight leakage day/1 pad.
3 mo. PSA 0.0 - now light pads


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 10/9/2009 8:47 PM (GMT -6)   
Ohio, there you go again. What did I ever do to you personally?

I have tried to treat you with respect, that gets me no where. When I have disagreed, I try to do so with diplomacy. Yeah, I am getting sick of getting slammed by you. Why do you think you have some holy grail of knowledge, I don''t appreciate you saying above,
"I have no basis or idea". Who are you to keep judging me. I write from the heart to my fellow brothers and sisters here, I don't pretend to be a doctor, or a master of copy/pasting other peoples words and opinions. So please simply leave me alone in the future. You say I need a hobby, got some good ones. You need a life without this bitterness and hate being spewn toward me all the time. Just put me on your ignore list, and move on with your life.

Let there be peace on earth, and let it begin with me.

I hold no grudge against your rudeness and condenscending ways, so let's depart in peace.

David in SC
Age: 57, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 7/08 12.3, 9/08 14.5, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 - 7/7 Positive, 40-90% Cancer, Gleason 4+3
Open RP: 11/08, Rht nerves saved, 4 days in hospt, on catheters for 63 days, 5th one out 1/09
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos margin
Post Surgery  PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Latest: 7/09 met 2 rad. oncl, 7/09 cath #6 - blockage, 8/9 2nd corr surgery, 8/9 cath #7 - out  38 days, 9/14/9 - met 3rd rad. oncl.agree to start radiation, mapping on 9/21/9, 9/24 - mtg with uro/surg, 9/29- pre-op, 10/1 - 3rd corr. surgery - suprapubic cath/hard dialation, 10/5 - first treatment IMRT.


Sleepless09
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 1267
   Posted 10/9/2009 9:19 PM (GMT -6)   
I confess I'm puzzled by OhioState's concern about British care. I'd have said pretty much the opposite. I'm not sure either of us has any real reason for holding the opinions we do. I've got no good reason to believe what I do, aside from my visits to Britian over the years. As for OhioState's reasons, if knowing folks in a country that aren't enthused about medicine, and/or hospitals, and/or doctors is the criteria of medical excellence, I'd wonder where anyone might be safe.

I think we have to recognize that just as internet support groups attract those that need support, not those who have an easy time of it, (mentally and/or physically,) the people who comment on health care they've received, or not received, from a particular doctor, hospital, insurance provider, system or state, tend to be those with issues.

I suspect darn few people call Uncle Fred or Cousin Susie in England to be told, "I was in for the most wonderful colonoscopy today. They were right on time, everyone was so nice, and I got my excellent results right away from the most caring and compassionate doctor."

Dog bites man isn't news. Man bites dog is news. Man has fantastic medical experience and tells no one --- boring! Man has terrible experience and tells everyone --- exciting!

Anecdotal evidence isn't the way to judge health care. Although, I confess, my own medical experiences, both good and bad, are the criteria which I too often project as the truth for all, not just myself.

Sheldon AKA Sleepless
Age 67 in Apil '09 at news of 4 of 12 cores positive T2B and Gleason 3 + 3 and 5% to 25% PSA 1.5
Re-read of slides in June said Gleason 3 + 4 same four cores 5% to 15%
June 29 daVinci prostatectomy, Dr. Eric Estey, at Royal Alexandra Hospital Edmonton one night stay
Flew home to Winnipeg on July 3 after 5 nights in Ramada Inn  ---  perfect recovery spot!
Catheter out July 9, so far, so good
Final pathology is 3 + 4 Gleason 7, clear margins, clear nodes, T2C, sugeron says report is "excellent"
First post op PSA Sept 09  0.02
Oct 1st 09 -- dry at night, during day some stress issues, but better every week.    


goodlife
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 2691
   Posted 10/9/2009 10:07 PM (GMT -6)   
I like it Sheldon ! How can anyone who hasn't lived in the country know much more than having heard from someone who heard from someone.

I know as a Canadian you suffer some of the same rumor/heresay stuff. My sin-in-law is from Alberta. While health care is different in Canada than the U.S., doesn't mean it's better or worse.

By the way, I'll be flying over your head on Thursday, heading to hunting camp in Alberta for a week. Can't wait !
Age 58, PSA 4.47 Biopsy - 2/12 cores , Gleason 4 + 5 = 9
Da Vinci, Cleveland Clinic  4/14/09   Nerves spared, but carved up a little.
0/23 lymph nodes involved  pT3a NO MX
Catheter and 2 stints in ureters for 2 weeks due to anatomical issues with location of ureters with respect to bladder neck.  Try 3 tubes where no tubes are supposed to be for 2 weeks !
Neg Margins, bladder neck negative
Living the Good Life, cancer free  6 week PSA  <.03
3 month PSA <.01 (different lab)
5 month PSA <.03 (undetectable)


don826
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 1010
   Posted 10/10/2009 8:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Good thread and discussion. I too have wondered about this very same subject. I recently went back to work at my former employer and they are very much aware of my situation. My employment is as a contract engineer, not regular employee, so the company bears no liability for medical costs should the need arise. I am aware of the legalities of disclosure but I feel (personally) that it would be better to discuss this with a prospective employer. As someone previously stated if that is enough to keep them from hiring me I probably don't want to work there anyway. Plus it just avoids what may turn into an unpleasant situation. When my former employer called and asked if would and could return to work I told my employer that my cancer was in remission and that my health was otherwise quite good.
 
Best to all,
Don
Diagnosed 04/10/08 Age 58 at the time
Gleason 4 + 3
DRE palpable tumor on left side
100% of 12 cores positive for PCa range 35% to 85%
Bone scan clear and chest x ray clear
CT scan shows potential lymph node involvement in pelvic region
Started Casodex on May 2 and stopped on June 1, 2008
Lupron injection on May 15 and every four months for next two years
Started IMRT/IGRT on July 10, 2008. 45 treatments scheduled
First 25 to be full pelvic for a total dose of 45 Gray to lymph nodes.
Last 20 to prostate only. Total dose to prostate 81 Gray.
Completed IMRT/IGRT 09/11/08.
PSA 02/08 21.5 at diagnosis
PSA 07/08 .82 after 8 wks of hormones
PSA 10/08 .642 one month after completion of IMRT, 6 months hormone
PSA 03/09 .38 six months post radiation and nine months into hormones 
PSA 06/09 .36 or .30 depending on who did the test
PSA 09/09 .33 one year after IMRT and 16 months into hormone
 
 
 


Sonny3
Veteran Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 2447
   Posted 10/11/2009 6:30 AM (GMT -6)   
Ohio State,

Honestly and from the heart, this forum is about all things cancer related. Many times that is discussions about medical issues and experiences and many more times it is about HOPE and SUPPORT. I have found both in abundance on this site. I am quite adept at medical research and could have found all of the medical knowledge that I needed for my journey by searching the net. What I have found here goes far beyond that.

Ask any medical professional and they will tell you that with any treatment for anything there has to be hope and a positive attitude that must accompany the treatment for it to be truly successful.

What do you bring to the forum that is positive? Does this omnipotent attitude that you seem to possess prevail in your life everyday? Is there a PHD, MD or some other alphabet that follows your name that we are unaware of? If so you have a lousy bed-side manner. It must be a lonely place where you reside at the top and looking down on us lowly and imperfect mortals.

I have been a sports official for 20 years and have run across every type of mean spirited and argumentative individual there is. But honestly my man you take the prize.

I am just beginning my journey into the life of PCa. I am three plus weeks post surgery and face the the same never ending tests and fears that we all do waiting for the next PSA test. All we have is the hope we carry with us while waiting. We all learn from the trials and tribulations of individuals that others have experienced that have gone before us.

What do I get from you? Do I learn that life with PCa is bitter, angry and not worth the fight? I surely hope not.

You remind me of my mother, who recently has passed. A few years ago she announced that at this point in her life she had decided that she was "just going to be honest and tell it like it is" in the future. I had to tell her that she was not telling it like it is, but rather she had taken the position that she was just being plain RUDE. Her husband of 33 years had passed 10 years ago and the despair had been building. Her official cause of death as listed on the certificate was "Adult Failure to Thrive". She just gave up and found no reason to go on. None of us knew and none of us could have helped. It was a journey she undertook on her own.

You advise others to be honest, to find hobbies and to get lives. Where are you in living your own advice? Is it your contention that we choose lives of being mean spirited and that our hobbies include finding fault with others? If that is the your measurement of success, I am glad to say that I will fail.

I will not choose to select ignoring your posts in the future, for I can learn much from you. By and large my success in life will be measured in how I learn "NOT TO TREAT OTHERS AS YOU DO".

As you have so often requested, this post is as honest as I can be and from the heart.

Sonny
61 years old
PSA 11/07 3.0
PSA 5/09 6.4
Diagnosis confirmed July 9, 2009
12 Needle Biopsy = 9 clear , 3 postive
<5%, 90%, 40%
Gleason Score (3+4) 7 in all positive cores
CT Organ Scan - negative
Nuclear Bone Scan - Negative

da Vinci 9/17/09 Dr. Mani Menon Henry Ford Medical Institute

Post Surgery Pathology:
Gleason: Changed to (4+3) = 7
Stage: T3a
Tumor Volume 12.5%
ALL NERVES SPARED
Margins: focally positive right posterior mid level
Perineural Invasion: present
Seminal Invasion: absent
Venous Invasion: absent
Angiolymphatic Invasion: absent
Left Internal iliac lymph node: reveals zero
Right Internal lymph node: reveals zero

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