WHAT DOES THIS MEAN ?

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anxiety out the roof
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:22 AM (GMT -6)   
I was told my biopsy report was sent away to be stained. What does that mean ?

142
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:30 AM (GMT -6)   
It is part of one of the more detailed tests. Biopsy and pathology samples are generally sent off for analysis unless you are at a major center which has pathology services.

LV-TX
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:35 AM (GMT -6)   
Staining is used to highlight the cell structure. This enables the pathologist to clearly grade the cells. Low grade cancer cells look very much like normal healthy cells, therefore staining is used to accurately determine which ones are normal from those that are cancerous.

Common practice and as 142 stated often sent away for this procedure.
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

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anxiety out the roof
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:41 AM (GMT -6)   
So[ and I'm hoping here] if the cells were very different from normal cells; they would have seen the difference and staining would not have been needed.

142
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:47 AM (GMT -6)   
The samples are always sent to a lab for analysis. It is part of the process. The uro who takes the samples would not look at them, and even if he did, might not make sense of them.
 
There is nothing to be concerned about - the process is normal. If you had asked for other tests, there might be additional stains used (I was thinking that), but yes, even for the basic view they need them to outline the cells under the microscope. Google Gleason Scores - I sure there is the traditional example out on the web somewhere.
 
 

LV-TX
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Actually, different colored stains are used. They also not only identify cell structure they are also are used as a marker to identify the location where the sample was taken from. This enables by color to immediately identify which quadrant of the prostate the sample was taken from.

As 142 said, nothing to be concerned about.
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

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anxiety out the roof
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   Posted 9/29/2010 8:55 AM (GMT -6)   
I was told that a pathologist came into their office once a week to look at the samples. They were sent off for staining after the pathologist looked at them. That is why I'm concerned.

142
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   Posted 9/29/2010 9:05 AM (GMT -6)   
I would expect that you want a proper analysis from a lab that deals with PCa, which seems to be what they are getting for you. If you need details on why they are doing things as they are, ask the doctor.
 
Don't worry about the process. Relax a little and expect the best unless proven otherwise.

LV-TX
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   Posted 9/29/2010 9:06 AM (GMT -6)   
Anxiety,

The concerned part is just part of the process. Fully understand where you are coming from. Seems like we always get anxious and concerned about any little test whether it is the biopsy, the psa test, bone scan or anyother test given. It's the waiting for the results that is always the toughest.

I would imagine that the pathologist is doing due diligence in making sure that the analysis will be correct. I don't think you can make any kind of judgement one way or the other by having them reviewed at another facility. Actually this is good, because you would want them read again by a different pathologist for a second opinion anyway.

BTW My slides were read by two different doctors before giving me the results.
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

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anxiety out the roof
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   Posted 9/29/2010 9:22 AM (GMT -6)   
My concern is that the cells are being staged as to the degree of cancer- Gleason determination. I would think that if all was well; there would be no need for a second opinion.

LV-TX
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   Posted 9/29/2010 9:26 AM (GMT -6)   
And it could also mean that no cancer was found and a second confirmation is needed.
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

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anxiety out the roof
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   Posted 9/29/2010 9:27 AM (GMT -6)   
Les- thanks- I hope your correct.

zufus
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   Posted 9/29/2010 11:13 AM (GMT -6)   
Take a look at these 18 variant PCa samples, some are stained

www.webpathology.com/case.asp?case=23  

There are supposedly 24+ variant types of PCa now identified, I don't have a weblink handy on this yet.  You are entering the twilight zone of PCa.

anxiety out the roof
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   Posted 9/29/2010 12:28 PM (GMT -6)   
Hope that dosn't mean I have PCa and they are trying to determine what type.

compiler
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   Posted 9/29/2010 12:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Anxiety:
 
We know what you are going through. Do they know when the results will be in?
Please let us know the results
 
Mel

anxiety out the roof
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Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 111
   Posted 9/29/2010 12:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Maybe Friday- will do- thanks

English Alf
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   Posted 9/29/2010 1:01 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Anxiety,

Staining is the most normal thing to do when looking at slides. I did it in class when I was sixteen or even younger. Have a look at

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histology

This is the important sentence from the articve:
"Biological tissue has little inherent contrast in either the light or electron microscope. Staining is employed to give both contrast to the tissue as well as highlighting particular features of interest."

All the best
Alf
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