Soy Isoflavins and Radiation

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compiler
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7213
   Posted 10/29/2010 11:15 AM (GMT -6)   
Interesting article in Urology Today:
Soy isoflavones sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy by
inhibiting cell survival pathways activated by radiation. At the same time, soy
isoflavones have significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, which
may help prevent the side effects of radiation. Therefore, we hypothesized that
soy isoflavones could be useful when given in conjunction with curative
radiation therapy in patients with localized prostate cancer. In addition to
enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy, soy isoflavones could prevent the
adverse effects of radiation. We conducted a pilot study to investigate the
effects of soy isoflavone supplementation on acute and subacute toxicity (≤ 6
mo) of external beam radiation therapy in patients with localized prostate
cancer. Forty-two patients with prostate cancer were randomly assigned to
receive 200 mg soy isoflavone (Group 1) or placebo (Group 2) daily for 6 mo
beginning with the first day of radiation therapy, which was administered in 1.8
to 2.5 Gy fractions for a total of 73.8 to 77.5 Gy. Adverse effects of radiation
therapy on bladder, bowel, and sexual function were assessed by a
self-administered quality of life questionnaire at 3 and 6 mo. Only 26 and 27
patients returned completed questionnaires at 3 and 6 mo, respectively. At each
time point, urinary, bowel, and sexual adverse symptoms induced by radiation
therapy were decreased in the soy isoflavone group compared to placebo group. At
3 mo, soy-treated patients had less urinary incontinence, less urgency, and
better erectile function as compared to the placebo group. At 6 mo, the symptoms
in soy-treated patients were further improved as compared to the placebo group.
These patients had less dripping/leakage of urine (7.7% in Group 1 vs. 28.4% in
Group 2), less rectal cramping/diarrhea (7.7% vs. 21.4%), and less pain with
bowel movements (0% vs. 14.8%) than placebo-treated patients. There was also a
higher overall ability to have erections (77% vs. 57.1%). The results suggest
that soy isoflavones taken in conjunction with radiation therapy could reduce
the urinary, intestinal, and sexual adverse effects in patients with prostate
cancer.
 
Seems to me it might be prudent to take this stuff during SRT?!
Mel
PSA-- 3/08--2.90; 8/09--4.01; 11/09--4.19 (PSAf: 24%), PCA3 =75 .
Biopsy 11/30/09. Gleason 4+3. Stage: T1C. Current Age: 64
Surgery: Dr. Menon @Ford Hospital, 1/26/10.
Pathology Report: G 4+3. Nodes: Clear. PNI: yes. SVI: No. EPE: yes. Pos. Margin: Yes-- focal-- 1 spot .5mm. 100% continent by 3/10. ED- in progress. First post-op PSA on 3/10/10-: 0.01. PSA on 6/21/10--0.02. 9/21/10--0.06

goodlife
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 2691
   Posted 10/29/2010 11:48 AM (GMT -6)   
What aisle are the soy isoflavins in ?
Goodlife
 
Age 58, PSA 4.47 Biopsy - 2/12 cores , Gleason 4 + 5 = 9
Da Vinci, Cleveland Clinic  4/14/09   Nerves spared, but carved up a little.
0/23 lymph nodes involved  pT3a NO MX
Catheter and 2 stints in ureters for 2 weeks .
Neg Margins, bladder neck negative
Living the Good Life, cancer free  6 week PSA  <.03
3 month PSA <.01 (different lab)
5 month PSA <.03 (undetectable)
6 Month PSA <.01
1 pad a day, no progress on ED.  Trimix injection
No pads, 1/1/10,  9 month PSA < .01
1 year psa (364 days) .01
15 month PSA <.01

Carlos
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 10/29/2010 12:59 PM (GMT -6)   
Goodlife,  At Walmart the isoflavones are 2 aisles past the Depends and just down from the jock itch powder.  I don't know why I know this.  Mel, sounds good but I don't know of anyone who has tried it yet.  Is there any down side?
 
Carlos

Diagnosed 2/2008 at age 71, PSA 9.1, Gleason score 5+3, stage T1c.
Robotic surgery 5/2008, LFPF at 6 wks.,nerves spared, stg. pT2c, N0, MX, R0, Gleason 5+3
PSA <0.1 at 26 months and at all tests since surgery.

compiler
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7213
   Posted 10/29/2010 1:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Carlos:
 
From my reading, it sounds like a typical health food store item. They listed possible digestive side effects, but it sounded uncommon.
 
Mel
PSA-- 3/08--2.90; 8/09--4.01; 11/09--4.19 (PSAf: 24%), PCA3 =75 .
Biopsy 11/30/09. Gleason 4+3. Stage: T1C. Current Age: 64
Surgery: Dr. Menon @Ford Hospital, 1/26/10.
Pathology Report: G 4+3. Nodes: Clear. PNI: yes. SVI: No. EPE: yes. Pos. Margin: Yes-- focal-- 1 spot .5mm. 100% continent by 3/10. ED- in progress. First post-op PSA on 3/10/10-: 0.01. PSA on 6/21/10--0.02. 9/21/10--0.06

Julietinthewoods
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 309
   Posted 10/29/2010 2:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Okay, Carlos made me laugh! Mel, does the article indicate any benefit to using plain old soy products like soy milk? There shouldn't be any downside to that.

Juliet

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 10/29/2010 3:21 PM (GMT -6)   
geez, not another one, run it past the oncologist you are going to talk to. can you translate what you cut and pasted into an easy to understand and read paragraph?
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

compiler
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7213
   Posted 10/29/2010 4:36 PM (GMT -6)   
David:
 
With all due respect, you have more than a modicom of English skills.
 
What part was not understandable?
 
I did cut and paste but the formatting was exactly as I received it from Urology today.
 
I might mention it to the oncologist (not sure if she is up on diet/nutrition/supplements, although one would hope she is).
 
I might also send this along to the Ford expert in this area.
 
Mel

John T
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Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4237
   Posted 10/29/2010 6:14 PM (GMT -6)   
Who really knows if it will or not. I switched from dairy to soy just before my radiation and had very few side affects with 130 gys. It can't hurt you so why not try it.
JT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

Sephie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1804
   Posted 10/29/2010 6:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Mel, don't know if you can buy soy in pill form but you can easily find it in soy products (soy milk, tofu, ice cream, etc.). Gotta watch soy though...it's good for some things but not good for others (women with certain cancers, especially hormone-positive breast cancer are strongly encouraged to stay away from soy). It also can cause your digestive system to misbehave with excessive gas and BMs...which could add to any side effects from RT.

My advice, if you decide to add soy to your diet, is to do so very gradually to avoid the digestive issues. Also note that products like soy milk are usually higher in calories than regular milk...I've known several people who switched to soy milk and packed on quite a few pounds in the process. I'd check first with your medical team, especially the radiation oncologist if that's where you wind up.

compiler
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7213
   Posted 10/29/2010 9:56 PM (GMT -6)   
Sephie:
 
I have used soy milk (light) with my cereal every morning. Obviously it certainly didn't head off my PC.
 
I am not sure if this is the same as the soy isoflavones. (I'm not even sure what is meant by isoflavones; but they do sell them all over the place!)
 
Mel

Sephie
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 1804
   Posted 10/30/2010 8:01 AM (GMT -6)   
Mel, found this blurb on a website:

The chemical structure of isoflavones is very similar to that of our own estrogen. Because of this similarity in structure, they can interfere with the action of our own estrogen. Depending on the type of estrogen receptor on the cells, isoflavones may reduce or activate the activity of estrogen. Isoflavones can compete with estrogen for the same receptor sites thereby decreasing the health risks of excess estrogen. They can also increase the estrogen activity. If during menopause the body's natural level of estrogen drops, isoflavones can compensate this by binding to the same receptor, thereby easing menopause symptoms as a result. The best way to consume isoflavones is in the form soy or soyfoods, so you can benefit from other healthy components of soy. Soy contains many types of isoflavones, but the most beneficial are genistein (see picture) and daidzein. The highest amounts of soy isoflavones can be found in soy nuts and tempeh. Another natural source of isoflavones is red clover.
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