Cancer back after 13 years remission

New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
31 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
[ << Previous Thread | Next Thread >> ]

mozart250
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 10/29/2010 5:11 PM (GMT -6)   
This one is about my 86 year old dad.

He had prostate cancer surgery 13 years ago. As a gleason 6 guy with no positive margins and zeros in his post-op psa, we were all feeling pretty good this was behind him.

Now 13 years later his psa has risen to 3.6 and he is starting radiation. Since he is 86, my brother and I are taking it on ourselves to do the transportation thing.

This one has me perplexed. Like how can it be zero so long and then so much later begin to rise again.

I would never tell my dad this, but I wish he had gone for radiation earlier..I am assuming it did not rise from 0.0 to 3.6 in one time period. But at 86, I suppose it is still likely he will die of anything else.

Has anybody else heard of it coming back after 13 years? Ths seems very odd to me.

As for me..my psa has been under 0.1 oh for about a year and a half or so. But this is like a big wake up call. I am not 86.

LV-TX
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 966
   Posted 10/29/2010 5:28 PM (GMT -6)   
Sorry to hear about your dad.

I have a question. Is there a reason at his age to start additional therapy. I wouldn't think that his psa suddenly jumped that high, but rather a slow progression over the years. Seems like radiation would be very hard on someone that age. Couldn't it just be monitored without the radiation?

Best of luck though. Hopefully this additional therapy will knock it back down.
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

Signature details in Sticky Post above - page 2

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25393
   Posted 10/29/2010 5:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Also, sorry to hear about your dad. Radiation would have to rough at his age, I hope he does well, and that it knocks back his
current PSA. In the past 13 years, was his PSA being checked, at least yearly? It more than likely was a slow climb back to the
current level.

david in sc
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

Squirm
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 744
   Posted 10/29/2010 5:58 PM (GMT -6)   
I never understood that either, how a cancer can come back after 10 years or so. How does that happen...is there cancer cells present since after the surgery that eventually duplicated in a repetition and progressed and became aggressive enough to survive the immune system....Something I never understood either.

At any rate, was your father being monitored after surgery? Is he seeing a oncologist with pca specialty? I think that would be the next step.

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/29/2010 6:04 PM (GMT -6)   
Moz,
29 years is possible. It happened to my best friends father. If you have been watching me post here I have been banging a huge drum on the inadequacy of prostate cancer studies. A ten year study tells us little and very few studies maintain the integrity or commitment to be effective beyond ten years. As I continue to learn and grow with my work in advocacy I see more and more of these stories. It has impressed on me the following:

1> Aside from certain advanced intermediate and high risk cases, almost no one dies of prostate cancer in the first 10 years.
2> If you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, it is a lifetime diagnosis. So monitoring should continue for that duration.

From what you are saying I can deduce that your father was diagnosed at age 73 with G6 disease. Many today would have likely sent him home on active surveillance. I can't say that that would be bad advice or not, but at least with the surgery he enjoyed a 13 year remission. Good luck in the coming weeks. You have my prayers that your father returns to remission and continues to another remission.

Davi's question is a valid question. Has you father been tested frequently? Has he been seeing a slow climb? This is important because if this is a sudden jump over the last year it is very aggressive. If he can wait before SRT, He might get another test in three months and see what the delta is.

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

BillyMac
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 1858
   Posted 10/29/2010 7:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Sorry to read of your dad's relapse ----- at his age radiation will be a little tougher than usual. We often see here that PCa is referred to as a horrrible invader. Nothing could be further from the truth. What we have to remember is that it is essentially you ------- your own normal cells with your DNA, DNA which programs your cells and tissue to do certain things and perform certain functions and have a certain life span. This is why you cannot "catch" cancer except in very exceptional circumstances (those on immunotherapy or with extremely compromised immune systems). But in the normal course of evolution the DNA in all species can change. From one generation to the next a C may become an A or a T or a G and this can cause slight or major changes from one generation to the next. With cancer the DNA within a normal cell is disrupted or altered for one reason or an other within the person. Now that cell will not follow the rules. Usually your immune system will take care of this by eliminating the rogue cell(s). But if it cannot, the now changed cell can divide and multiply. But it no longer does what it is suppose to do. Normal prostate cells stay witin the prostate doing their job, dying when it is their time and being cleaned up by the lymphatic system. They are constantly being replaced by new prostate cells and they stay where thaey are supposed to. Different cells have different lifetimes------I did read once that the human body is replaced over a cycle of about seven years but this is not correct. Bone cells live for about 20 years I believe. Cancer cells have usually lost their designated use by date and are essentially immortal. They may or may not ever die. These cells can just hang around indefinately or take it into their heads to divide and multiply. But the problem now is they are altered and do not stay where they are supposed to. Although once a normal prostate cell doing its thing in the gland, now it has changed and can wander off and live happily in other parts of the body. And this is where the danger lays -------- the actual cancer isn't what kills PCa sufferers, it is what it does that does the damage. Bone is relaced by softer changed prostate cells (thus weakened), good functioning liver or kidney or brain or lung cells are replaced and the organs cannot function as was intended. Essentially your body's organised system breaks down and fails. I suppose in a way you could say your body kills itself. This is why a cure to all cancers is so illusive --------- as every person is slightly different then every case of cancer is slightly different. But I have faith in the human mind ------ we will get there eventually and eliminate cancer, probably by gene technology. Perhaps the day will come when a doctor will say " There's no great problem, it's only cancer. We can fix that easily."
Bill

ChrisR
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 831
   Posted 10/29/2010 7:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Tony,
 
I agree exactly with you.  I think what we are seeing with the advent of PSA testing is that this cancer runs a very long course.  This is exactly why it never sat right with me when Dr.'s were saying "dont' worry, your a low risk patient."  Baloney,  with the estimated years of life left in us, I am sure that it will eventually run it's course in me.  G6 or no G6.  I will just be tortured longer with this dread all year long.  I recently read an article on PCINFOLINK about circulating tumor cells in patients that had total tumor volume <.5cc  The study showed CTCs in 40% of these patients.  Since this cancer never seems to reach a point of "cured after x number of years."  I think being dx. at a young age it's only a matter of time.  All PSA testing has done if given us what is called "lead time bias."  Since tumors of such a small size were already producing CTCs, I have little to no hope about this desease being cured in anyone, given it enough time to run it's course.
 
I don't understand how even an institution like Johns Hopkins can make statements like the did to me about a "99.6% cure rate."  Their study had patients as far out as 22 years, although it probably was very few.
 

I feel like I am being assimilated by the BORG and resistance is futile.


julios
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 38
   Posted 10/29/2010 7:20 PM (GMT -6)   
Is there possibility that ADT alone would slow the progression sufficiently to allow him good quality of life the rest of his natural years? Talk to a good medical oncologist.
Age 52

At Diagnosis of PCa, had Gleason 9 and normal PSA

Radical Prostatectomy on July 7th, 2010 by Dr. Fagin using daVinci

25% to 50% nerves spared on left, 100% spared on right.

Continent from day one.

Pathology showed postive margins and extension beyond gland, including seminal vesicals and lymph nodes. Stage upgraded to T3b.

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4268
   Posted 10/29/2010 7:34 PM (GMT -6)   
His original Dx of a G6 which I assume was validated with post op pathology and his low psa really doesn't warrent treatment at 86. G6 cancers rarely matastize as their DNA is totally different from an agressive cancer. If there was ever a case for Active Surveillance your dad would be the poster child for it. Why run the risk of impacting his quality of life for his last years for a condition that will never affect him,
JohnT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/29/2010 7:41 PM (GMT -6)   
julios,
I thought about that as well. But if Moz's family tends to live to their mid 90's and beyond I know that HT alone might not be a great option. But I hear you.

@ChrisR
This case is not uncommon at all. I am seeing it more and more. Most studies were based on two very shaky premises: that most patients are at the median age at diagnosis (20 years ago that would have been 70+) and that ten years of data is sufficient to prove the efficacy of therapies. Well with PSA testing the median is now 64 in the US and most of these men will live beyond ten years. What's more PSA testing has brought in a new class of patient ~ guys like me under the age of 50. A twenty year study or two would certainly be nice. I have nothing for what I am experiencing. It makes me feel like the first astronauts. Point the ship and fire away!

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4268
   Posted 10/29/2010 7:44 PM (GMT -6)   
His original Dx of a G6 which I assume was validated with post op pathology and his low psa really doesn't warrent treatment at 86. G6 cancers rarely matastize as their DNA is totally different from an agressive cancer. If there was ever a case for Active Surveillance your dad would be the poster child for it. Why run the risk of impacting his quality of life for his last years for a condition that will never affect him. It is very difficult for a G6 to live outside the prostate capsul as it does not have the mutation charteristics of an agressive cancer. Reoccurrances are fairly common with G6 cancers, but death from PC is extremely rare even with reoccurrances. Radiation side affects, especially for older patients is risky, especially bowel issues which are very difficult to control and can play havoc with one's quality of life.
JohnT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/29/2010 8:04 PM (GMT -6)   
John,
Your recommendation is very general and not personalized to the patient...

My friends father recurred at age 82 as a Gleason 10 and was discovered in his bladder. He had no PSA relapse. He was put on Nilandron and radiation was used to slow the spread in his bladder. He had had an orchiectomy when he had his prostate surgery so the likelihood of an LHRH agonist working was slim.

First it must be determined if this is aggressive and what is the life expectancy of Moz's father. I assume with Moz's experience that they are aware that G6 is not dangerous. The question is whether he is dealing with G6 or something more aggressive and dangerous. If his father is otherwise healthy and longevity is common in his family, radiation is a reasonable approach.

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

Post Edited (TC-LasVegas) : 10/29/2010 7:18:56 PM (GMT-6)


Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25393
   Posted 10/29/2010 8:19 PM (GMT -6)   
John,

You don't and can't possibly know what Mozart's father's current gleason is. Yes, it was a G6 13 years ago, and it could possibly have mutated to a much higher gleason over the years. I feel like you are trying to force your theory about G6s in a generalized way, without any real way of proving it in a case like this. I would love to know the answer too, you may be right, but you may be dead wrong too.
 
His current PSA of 3.6 is not low, for one that has recurrance after surgery, regardless of the length of the time.  It is way outside the normal window that most radiation oncologists would feel that salvage radiation would have any chance of working.  I agree that at his advanced age, further treatment might not be the answer.

David in SC

Post Edited (Purgatory) : 10/29/2010 7:24:17 PM (GMT-6)


Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3887
   Posted 10/29/2010 8:37 PM (GMT -6)   
Julios brings up an excellent point..I must question the appropriateness of subjecting an 86 year old the the rigors of radiation therapy when HT alone will probably achieve the desired results...

Sometimes you can't help but wondering if the financial incentive presented by performing radiation therapy pushes patients in that direction when it may not be appropriate..

But who knows?? Maybe in this case it's completely appropriate...
Age 68.
PSA at age 55: 3.5, DRE normal. Advice, "Keep an eye on it".
age 58: 4.5
age 61: 5.2
age 64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
age 65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
age 66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
age 67 4.5 DRE "normal"
age 68 7.0 third biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RRP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/29/2010 9:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Moz,
Do you know at all what your father's PSA velocity is? If he has been tested annually, was he at undetectable last year? I would absolutely agree if this has been rising for years and/or your father has other health concerns worth considering that active surveillance is not out of the question. I did well with radiation but I was 44 years old and the jury is still out.

Fairwind,
julio's point is well taken. But I don't hesitate to point out that there are reasons that HT is overkill. HT certainly was not a walk in the park for me. I did reasonably well with it but it still got my vote for the least favorite of my therapies. The key is whether his current PSA is a fast moving marker or a very slow one.

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3887
   Posted 10/30/2010 12:27 AM (GMT -6)   
You are right Tony, NONE of these treatments are a "Walk In The Park", ESPECIALLY for a 86 year old....

ChrisR
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 831
   Posted 10/30/2010 7:04 AM (GMT -6)   
Tony,

In regards to your friends dad that had recurrence 29 years later. How was he dx. in 1981? That was before PSA. Was his desease more advanced at time of dx. Also, what was his Gleason score back then? I am assuming he was not organ confined after surgery either. If it was 29 years ago how old was he when he was dx?

Just wondered if you knew the details of his case.
Dx 42
Gleason 6 (tertiary score 0)

open RP 10/08 Johns Hopkins

pT2 Organ confined Gleason 6

PSA
10/15/2009 <.1
10/15/2010 <0.03
10/15/2011 -

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/30/2010 9:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Chris,
We can't answer some of those. He had a positive DRE but no PSA tests were available. His parents cannot produce a pathology report. His relapse was a fast moving G10 but we have no idea what the original Gleason was. Back then people were not as astute as they are now. I doubt that it was aggressive else it would not have taken 29 years to fester itself into what it is today. Prostate cancer in 1981 was dealt with far differently than it is today. There was no nerve sparing procedure and orchiectomy was common with the surgery.

We just have what information that we have today. I did see his recent bladder pathology a few months ago. They were very clear that it was a relapse of prostate cancer and it was G10. He is currently under the care of my oncologist.

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

mozart250
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 10/30/2010 11:10 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi:
To answer questions..13 years ago my dad had his prostate removed. At the time he was Gleason 6 and no post op abnormalities in his pathology report. We had every reason to believe that he had this licked.

He has of course faithfully been doing the follow up psa checks through the years. Now he is kind of a secretive guy, so he has not shared with us all the results of these checks. I am under the impression that they were zero throughout the years and that this represents a sudden spike (which is disconcerting) but I am not sure. I intend to ask him this.

At any rate radiation, hormone therapy, and "do nothing" were presented to him as three options. He chose radiation.

As far as his health, he is in remarkable health for 86. If prostate cancer doesn't get him, I wouldn't be surprised if he lives to 95-100. I think his immediate objective is to outlive his wife who is also 86 but not quite as good of health. After that, I don't think he cares. but this is just me speculating.

He will be coming to our house for 2 months while he has radiation so we can drive him to his appointments. I would worry about either one of them driving otherwise.

Tony Crispino
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 10/30/2010 11:37 AM (GMT -6)   
So there you have it. It's a personal decision and I respect it.

I certainly understand the calls for active surveillance and I can understand the decision to go forward based on good health and preference. With you there to help I am certain things can go quite well.

Good luck and if you don't mind keep us posted.

Tony
Disease:
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
RALP ~ 2/17/2007 at the City of Hope near Los Angeles.
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.

Status:
"I beat up this disease and took its lunch money! I am in remission."
I am currently not being treated, but I do have regular oncology visits.
I am the president of an UsTOO chapter in Las Vegas

Blog : www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25393
   Posted 10/30/2010 1:19 PM (GMT -6)   
mozart,

i wish only the best for your dad as he moves ahead with the SRT. He was given choices, and he made his own. I respect that. Offering to handle the transportation is a great help. I was 58 when I underwent SRT last fall, and the last two weeks were tough driving, and I only had to drive about 13 easy miles each way. Sure you dad will appreciate that gesture. Please let us know how he is doing through the treatments.

david in sc
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

ChrisR
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 831
   Posted 10/30/2010 4:48 PM (GMT -6)   
Mozart,

It would be interesting to know if it was a sudden spike. This is exactly why I think no one dx. under 60 is low risk. No matter what their Gleason score is.
Dx 42
Gleason 6 (tertiary score 0)

open RP 10/08 Johns Hopkins

pT2 Organ confined Gleason 6

PSA
10/15/2009 <.1
10/15/2010 <0.03
10/15/2011 -

mozart250
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 11/5/2010 3:29 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi:
My dad has come out for the preradiation markup this weekend. He will start radiation after Thanksgiving.

One minor detail. He told me over the phone his psa rose to 3.6. When I saw the paperwork I saw it had risen to only 0.36.

That makes much more sense. We were greatly relieved in learning this.

As the radiologist said, this probably will not impact his survival, but it will help his quality of life by lessening the chance of spreading.

My brother and I (and mom) support dad in this decision. We all expect him to live to 100

ChrisR
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 831
   Posted 11/5/2010 3:55 PM (GMT -6)   
Mozart250,
 
Glad to hear it for your dad.  That is a much better number.  I am guessing that this was probably of a years time from his last PSA test.  He will live to 100.  
 

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25393
   Posted 11/5/2010 4:56 PM (GMT -6)   
.36 is a whole different game than 3.6, this makes more sense, and the radiation may very well help him live out his remaining years
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10
New Topic Post Reply Printable Version
31 posts in this thread.
Viewing Page :
 1  2 
Forum Information
Currently it is Wednesday, September 19, 2018 9:28 AM (GMT -6)
There are a total of 3,004,607 posts in 329,157 threads.
View Active Threads


Who's Online
This forum has 161747 registered members. Please welcome our newest member, M1359.
217 Guest(s), 17 Registered Member(s) are currently online.  Details
Georgia Hunter, SoMuchFun, logoslidat, mattamx, countess18, MG0351, island time, compiler, astroman, Todd1963, 61Impala, sunny days, Woodduck12, moeskeeter, k07, Kay Tee, iPoop