Surgery far from home; travel tips?

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clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2680
   Posted 12/4/2010 12:02 AM (GMT -6)   
I was fortunate enough to have my surgery just half an hour from home.  I have a friend, however, who will be having surgery in mid-December at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.  He and his wife will be driving there from nine  hours away, and when he's discharged from the hospital following the DaVinci surgery, he and his wife will drive nine hours back home. 
 
I know that a lot of guys travel great distances to get treated at places like Johns Hopkins, the Cleveland Clinic, and so forth, but I'm at a loss to help my friend with hints that might help him prepare for this adventure.  Do people normally stay in town after the surgery for a period of time (e.g., until after the catheter is removed)?  Do they go home right away and have the catheter removed by their GP? I've told my friend that the half hour drive home from the hospital was about as far as I wanted to go, and I can't imagine what it would be like to travel for nine hours.
 
I'm concerned about catheter issues, possible blood clots, and general discomfort, but I don't want to be unnecessarily alarmist.  So, do you think that much traveling is do-able across the northern states in mid-December, or can you offer any tips that will help him and his wife accomplish this safely and with as much comfort as possible?  He's about 58 years old and in good physical condition.  I was hoping he would post these questions himself, but he hasn't, so I decided to do it.  I think it would be tremendously helpful if some of our veterans would share their wisdom.  I'm pretty sure he's been reading these pages, even if he hasn't yet posted anything himself.  Thanks.
 
 

Radical
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 739
   Posted 12/4/2010 12:14 AM (GMT -6)   
I think he will be okay, providing he stops often to stretch the old legs etc. I had to fly home straight form my surgery, on the plane for about 2 hrs, then the car home, so I guess I traveled for about 3-4 hrs, no problems at all. I was concerned and a bit fearful of the leg bag filling up to quickly on the plane, but even that was not a issue. If all he is worried about is the trip home, tell him he's a lucky man. I was more worried about the op etc, but it turned out to be very straight forward and I now wished I had not of worried at all. I was one of the lucky ones, whom recovered pretty quick. Good luck to your friend.............Rgds Kev
Age 52yrs [Gold Coast Qld, Australia]
6 out of 8 cores positive 3 X 60% / 3 X 10%
PSA 4 Gleason Score 3+4=7 Stage T1c
RP 24/12/08
Upgrade Gleason Score 4+3=7 Gleason Differential 60%/40%
Stage T2c Three small foci total volume <10%
Neg Margins and Nodes
Nil - EPE
Dry less than 1 week. ED- okay with Meds.
PSA at 18mths no change remains 0.03
"Everday in Everyway, I get better"

Carlos
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 486
   Posted 12/4/2010 7:29 AM (GMT -6)   
I had a 4 1/2 hr ride home after  surgery and it wasn't bad at all.  I took a pillow to sit on and we stopped every hour or so to walk and stretch.  Of course I was in the south,  I don' know about walking around in your area.  I did repeat the trip to get the catheter removed.  That was a challenge.  The rest stops weren't nearly close enough and I went through a lot of pads on the way home.   Looking back, it was pretty much a non event.
 
Carlos

Diagnosed 2/2008 at age 71, PSA 9.1, G8 (5+3), stage T1c.
Robotic surgery 5/2008, LFPF at 6 wks.,nerves spared, stg. pT2c, N0, MX, R0, G8 (5+3)
PSA .12 at 2.5 years, rechk 2 wks later 0.2. All prior tests <0.1.

knotreel
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 654
   Posted 12/4/2010 8:17 AM (GMT -6)   
I had a 4+ hour drive home, I was about 45 minutes into the trip and thought, hey, let me check the leg bag, full! so with iv fluids starting to come out, the bag needs attention. I completly filled the bag twice on the trip. Also they told me I should walk some every two hours as a precaution for blood clots in my legs. They put my leg bag directly on the catheter and roadside emptying was difficult. He should as they place an extension tube so the bag can be more easily emptied at his ankle without removing his pants.
06-08 1st biopsy neg psa 4
10-09 psa 5.5 2nd biopsy 1/12 pos. 10%, G(4+3) age 65
12-15-09 RRP Tulane NOLA Dr Lee
Path, 1%, clr marg, no EPE, no SVI, nodes cl, G(4+3)
100% incontinent after 3 mo. PT
ED, pre-op severe, post op total
10/10 Dr Boone, Baylor recomended AUS
AUS and IPP scheduled 1/11/11
post op psa's 0.04,<0.1,<0.1

rhb47
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 208
   Posted 12/4/2010 8:17 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Clocknut,

When my husband had surgery out of town ( 2 hours away), we stayed at a hotel across from the hospital as he didn't feel comfortable leaving the security of being near his surgeon as soon as he was released. I think it depends on the person-some people would be perfectly comfortable with it-others not. We did go home before the cath was out and returned one week later to have it removed. We stayed that night in the hotel again just to make sure there were no problems( the surgeon said we should stay in town overnight just to be on the safe side.) Quess it just depends on the person.

Renee
Husband diagnosed 3/10
Age 56, PSA 4.7, free 7.6%

Biopsy 5 of 10 cores positve-all right side-25% to 57%
Gleason 6
DaVinci surgery with Dr. Vip Patel scheduled 8/9/10

Post Op: Gleason 3+4=7
Negative surgical margins and lymph nodes
No seminal vesicle and angiolymphaic invasion
perineural invasion present
Both nerve bundles spared
No ED or incontinence
6 wk. PSA .01

tarhoosier
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 495
   Posted 12/4/2010 11:03 AM (GMT -6)   
I was discharged at 3 pm but it took another two hours to have nurse do the discharge education, final checks, there was a change of shift, with delays, then the cashier had to be consulted and then wait for an attendant to accompany me to the front. It was after 5 pm before I could leave. It was a mistake. The 3 hour drive home became six because of nasty weather and then the leg bag filled and drainage stopped and I had to go to a rest area toilet, with my wife in tow, to work on the catheter tube and bag which did not respond so we stopped at the emergency room of a small town hospital to have the catheter flushed and they had to consult the surgeon. All in all I made it home but I should have never tried to do so. Just another night at the hospital, which was possible, or in the motel across the street would have been completely different. I over expected myself. And I nearly killed my wife with fear and anxiety. Just my story. Take it from there.

Herophilus
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 664
   Posted 12/4/2010 11:13 AM (GMT -6)   
During my surgical experience the ride home was an issue…and I only had about 90 minutes! I was surprised how bumpy the highway was. It was most uncomfortable. At one point I asked my wife if she wanted to exit and go back because I was sure that she FINALLY missed a pothole... Note; don’t pick at your care giver. It would be important to fully disclose to the surgical team that your going to have this extended travel requirement (by car). As another poster noted…I’d be very concerned about thrombus in the lower extremities after such a challenging ride. Best of luck.
Hero
Age 51 PSA 6.8
Bxy 10 of 12 Cores positive for Gleason 6. up to 75%
Robotic surg 11-02-09
Post op path. 20% neoplasm;4+3=7 Gleason
All nodes (14) and other related tissue negative for cancer
No EPE
Post op PSA x 3, all <0.01

142
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 7082
   Posted 12/4/2010 12:44 PM (GMT -6)   
Suggestions for car travel - hmmm.
 
I was only about a 45 minute drive away, but it was a long one. From what I have experienced, and from talking with others, especially one who had sugery in December, and had a brutal winter weather drive, I have a few thoughts.
 
1) Be sure the person driving is comfortable with the route and the directions. Download maps as needed before-hand, review them, and check with the various state highway departments about planned construction.
 
2) Be sure the person driving is comfortable with the vehicle. Nothing worse than having someone at the wheel who is not used to the controls and handling of the vehicle on unfamiliar roads / in bad weather. Amazing what becomes a flash point while you are coming off the drugs.
 
3) My personal opinion - forget the leg bag for that trip. Keep the big/night bag attached, just in case. You don't want to be trying to figure out emptying the leg bag stuck in traffic. They did not give me an extension for the leg bag, and I realized that if I had used it, with the car seat arrangement, the bag would have been higher than my bladder, which is one of the most extreme of catheter errors. I noticed another member found this out the hard way.
 
4) Check the route maps for rest stops, and use them all to stretch. Get a pair of basketball pants (the type that snap up the side), so that you have an easier time putting them on around the catheter tube. Carry the bag in a shopping sack. If anybody makes a snide remark, empty your bag on their foot smhair . Well, maybe not.
 
5) My first long road trip, which normally takes about 5 hours, took 8 with the (seriously) needed pit stops. Plan for a place to make a stop for the night just in case.
 
6) Get a doughnut cushion (usually sold as an aid for hemorrhoid patients). Get the foam one, not the inflatable. The inflatable makes so much "balloon" noise that your driver will take it away from you.
 
7) Check with your surgeon and local uro - they may be able to agree on rules and schedule for removing the catheter locally, rather than all that driving for a two minute visit. Also get phone numbers for each, and their services, beforehand.
 
8) Be sure you have a proper emergency assistance service for the vehicle. You do not want to be trying to change a flat tire on the side of the road after surgery. Your car insurance may have this as an option, or get a membership with AAA or local equivalent. Considering the 18 hours + of total travel time, it will be a small investment, as well as remove another potential flash point. If you get a AAA membership, call the local office and ask for maps and a trip planner.
 
9) the Surgeon will likely give you prescriptions for post-op meds. Get them filled immediately, BEFORE you get on the road. You do not want to be part way home, have to stop for the night, and be in a small area that dosen't have a pharmacy, or the one there doesn't have the med in stock, or is out of network and charges full price.
 
10) Get some "underpads" for the car seat, just in case you leak. They are disposable, and come in packs of 10 or 20, depending on the size. You will find them useful at home anyway.
 
11) Take a blanket in the passenger area of the vehicle. You may have different temperature needs than the driver.
 
12) Get the vehicle looked over by your service shop, just to be sure everything is in order. Have the usual winter weather gear in the car.
 
13) If you do get discharged in the later afternoon, it may be wise to stay at a local hotel overnight, perhaps a little out of the high-traffic area, and start early the next day. At least that way it will not be all night driving.
 
14) Keep a notebook with the important information. If you get stuck on the road, and the cell battery dies, that wonderfull contact / appointment book app is no longer available. Been there, done that.
 
15) Don't argue with the driver about music choice, etc. You won't be right, and you can't drive anyway. Close your eyes and sleep. Works better for all concerned.
 
Just some thoughts -
 
Add ons -
 
16) Check to see if you should have a pneumonia vaccination. The travel circumstances may make it a risk. If you are not quite old enough, consult with your GP and insurance company. They may feel it is indicated and allow it anyway.
 
17) Carry any medication you are regularly taking in the actual prescription bottle with label, and carry at least an extra week's supply. At the hospital, they may use yours, instead of making you buy the daily pills from the pharmacy. My hospital asked me to do that, others, I have been told, do not.  The extra, of course, is "just in case".
 
 

Post Edited (142) : 12/4/2010 2:28:55 PM (GMT-7)


Jazzman1
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 1162
   Posted 12/4/2010 12:59 PM (GMT -6)   
Wow, clocknut... I don't think you're going to do any better than 142's response.

I'll just add: good luck to your buddy... with the surgery and the trip.

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2680
   Posted 12/4/2010 1:57 PM (GMT -6)   

Great responses, everyone.  Jazz, you're right.  142 really covered the bases. I guess the major health concerns would be blood clots, pneumonia, and problems with the catheter.  A lot of thought and planning have to be given to minimizing those risks when traveling (frequent stops, use of the spirometer for breathing exercises, and familiarity with the proper use of the catheter, for example).  I'm sure others have made this sort of a trip, but forewarned is fore-armed, and suggestions such as those being shared here are invaluable. 

I was hospitalized for three days, but I'm aware some are discharged the day after surgery.  I would think the length of the hospital stay also greatly changes the equation.

I didn't fully realize just how major the surgery is until I forced myself to watch a YouTube video of the DaVinci procedure. 

Thanks again to all.


142
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 7082
   Posted 12/4/2010 4:15 PM (GMT -6)   
Clocknut,
 
Many make the error of thinking they are "healed" after a few weeks. Glad you watched the video - I did too, but most don't really want to know, they just want to get back to routine, and then learn that it is different now -
 
I can't comment much on health complications of travel - just the things I know about. I am not technically old enough to get a pneumonia vaccination, by when I asked the insurance company (literally called from the exam room), and advised I was in for surgery in a week - they approved it without issue. I'll add that to my list above.
 
My surgery was in late October, so it was wet and cold, which made pneumonia a concern in my mind. I was in the hospital four nights.

hopenchange
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 19
   Posted 12/4/2010 7:57 PM (GMT -6)   
Tell him stay one or two nights close to the hospital beore he hits the road.
Scotty

Age 66

Routine physical at PCP office, with DRE and PSA Test. PSA 2.5, small growth felt on right side

Urologist performed TRUS biopsy 9/17/09,samples sent to Bostwick Labs

Results received from lab indicated PCa 9/24/09

3 of 12 samples 80% Gleason 3+3+6 on the right side

1 of 12 samples 70% Gleason 3+3=6 on the right side

2 of 12 samples 60% Gleason 3+3=6 on the right side

2 of 12 samples 50% Gleason 3+3=6 on the left side

1 of 12 samples 5% Gleason 3+3=6 on the left side

3 of 12 samples benign on the left side

CT scan and bone scan negative

Consultation at Johns Hopkins with Dr. Alan Partin 10/20/09

open RRP at Johns Hopkins by Dr. Partin 11/06/09, right nerve bundle removed, left spared

One night in hospital, back to hotel room for three days before flying home

Foley catheter removed 11/16/09

Post-surgery pathology shows PCa was organ-contained, lymph nodes negative, seminal vesicles negative, negative margins Gleason score 3+3=6, stage T1c

First post-surgery PSA first week of February 2010. Using one pad during day and one at night as of 1/28/10

Pad-free 3/3/10

No luck with the erectile dysfunction. Taking 50mg Viagara 3 times a week. Doctor prescribed 100mg daily beginning 6 weeks after catheter removal, but I can't put up with the headaches and congestion.

2/4/10 First post-surgery PSA - <0.1

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3891
   Posted 12/4/2010 9:36 PM (GMT -6)   
I agree with 142 and hopenchange..Stay in a motel near the hospital for a day or two before you hit the road. It will make a big difference.. Also, that way you can avoid any nasty weather..
Age 68.
PSA at age 55: 3.5, DRE normal. Advice, "Keep an eye on it".
age 58: 4.5
" 61: 5.2
" 64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
" 65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
" 66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
" 67 4.5 DRE "normal"
" 68 7.0 third biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RRP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9 SRT, HT, Dec

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25393
   Posted 12/4/2010 11:49 PM (GMT -6)   
As the undisputed King of Catheters, my advice to your friend if he is going to have to have a long car trip:

Leave the hospital with the night/big bag. Don't even bother with the leg bag. The leg bag is only going to hold 400-500 ml where the night/big bag will hold from 2000 to 4000 ml of urine. Since he won't be driving, or if he wants to lie down in the back seat, the big bag with its long hose would allow him to be more comfortable. With the leg bag, it will keep him sitting up all the time. If he is self conscious about the bag while getting out of the car, then just put it in a tote bag, easy enough. Most of the big/night bags tend to equalize the pressure between the bladder and the bag, where the leg bag is just a simple gravity device. For all my catheter time, I avoided leg bags like the plague, as they always made me feel more uncomfortable, unless I had to wear one. I remember being on a job interview once with the leg bag under my best suit, it chose then to feel quickly, in one hour, I had to make an excuse to go to the bathroom to empty it. Didn't get the job.

david in sc
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

mtguy1999
New Member


Date Joined May 2008
Total Posts : 9
   Posted 12/6/2010 11:29 PM (GMT -6)   
Call me the voice of caution but I would not recommend any travel for a couple of days after release. And especially in December and Minnesota. The weather and a resently released surgery patient with a catheter is not a good combination. If he must travel, I would make sure they know every ER there is along the route. I had my surgery 10 hrs from our house. My surgeon insisted on no long road travel for a number of days. As it turned out, I developed complications and ended up in the hospital 12 days anyway. Even then, after discharge, he wanted me to stick around close a couple of days.
 
Once travel was approved, he cautioned me on frequent stops and stretch the legs and watch for clotting. And the roads seem to be really bumpy when you have surgery openings healing and all. He may feel like the road trip will not be a big deal now but he may change his tune once he comes out of the recovery room. Do the hotel thing for a couple of days and listen to the surgeon about when it is safe for travel.

freinds
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2010
Total Posts : 76
   Posted 12/7/2010 9:49 AM (GMT -6)   
The trip home and follow-up visits were a big concern for me in deciding where to have surgery done. I was looking at Cleveland Clinic which was 5 hours away and I decided that while it might be ok for the trip home, it would be too far away for follow up visits or if I had complications once home.
I think it hinges somewhat on if you have access to a local urologist who is willing to see you and treat any problems, including the cathedor if needed. Our local urologists for the most part did not want to treat anothers surgery and even if they would they are really busy and hard to get into.
In the end I traveled to a University Center only two hours away, had good care and the travel ended up being not a big problem.
Take time to think through all your options and I'm sure you will make the right choice.

Alegar
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 91
   Posted 12/7/2010 12:04 PM (GMT -6)   
I had a 4.5 hour drive from UNC Chapel Hill. My wife's good planning put us in a motel across the street for 2 days postop. Sixteen days later I drove the 4.5 hours to have the cath removed and then we went home. That's when everything went bad.

I started having bladder spasms that lasted 1 to 1.5 hrs at a time. This went on for two days. At that time, I distinctly remember wishing I was still across the street from UNC.
Diagnosis:
July 1, '10
PSA 3.88
Gleason 3+3=6
2 out of 12 samples positive

Solution:
DaVinci Oct 1 '10, UNC Chapel Hill
Cath/JP Drain out Oct.16, '10

Personal Statistics:
Age: 54
Weight: 184 lbs.
Height: 6 feet

AIRBORNE ALL THE WAY!

Post Edited (Alegar) : 12/7/2010 10:12:42 AM (GMT-7)


Wigs
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 89
   Posted 12/7/2010 4:10 PM (GMT -6)   
clocknut,

My salvage prostatectomy was in New York, so I flew up and back. I stayed 10 days after my surgery for other reasons. The flight home was not that difficult.

My subsequent surgeries, etc. were in Cleveland which was an 11 hour drive. My surgeries were usually on Thursday and I usually stayed over the weekend, saw my doctor on Monday morning and started the drive home. I usually stopped every 2 - 3 hours, stretch my legs, go to the bathroom, etc. There again, it wasn't all that difficult. I rode in the passenger front seat, leaned all the way back with pillows.

Wigs
Diagnosed @ age 46 - September 1997
PSA 5 / Gleason 3+3
Seed Implant - January 1998 @ Trident Hospital, SC
PSA 2.4 - July 2007
PSA 2.7 - July 2008
PSA 3.0 - November 2008
Diagnosed @ age 57 - December 2007
Gleason 4+3
Salvage Prostatectomy & Colostomy - March 2008 @ MSKCC, NY
Suprapubic cathether installed - July 2008 @ Cleveland Clinic, OH
Urethral-Rectal Fistula Repair - August 2008 @   Cleveland Clinic, OH
PSA < .03 - Aug 2008
Penile catheter removed October 2008
Suprapubic catheter removed December 2008
Colostomy Reversal - January 2009 @ Cleveland Clinic
Urethral stricture removed - January 2009 @ Cleveland Clinic
(Total incontinence - 4 diapers & 6 - 8 pads per 24 hour period)
PSA < .03 - Jan 2009
AUS implant - May 2009 @ Cleveland Clinic
PSA < .03 - May 2009
AUS activated - July 2009
(Wearing a light pad daily.)
PSA < .03 - July 2009
Penile Implant - December 2009 @ Cleveland Clinic
PSA < .03 - December 2009
Penile Implant activated - February 2010
PSA < .01 - April 2010 
 

Flytyer2
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 33
   Posted 12/8/2010 4:31 PM (GMT -6)   
I, too, will be traveling to Mayo in mid-December for surgery (retro pubic), then back home, back to Mayo 10 days later for catheter removal, then finally back home, each trip about 12 hours, but interstate about 90 percent of the way. After reading the posts here, may try to stay in hotel across from hospital in Rochester an extra day or 2; just don't won't to miss Christmas at home. Good luck to your friend; perhaps we'll cross paths at the Mayo.
Age 61
PSA: 12/09 7.3 (Proscar) -- 7/10 9.06 (Proscar)
--------------------------------------------------
Biopsy 9/13
One of 12 cores positive: <5%
Stage T1C; Gleason 3 + 3 = Gleason 6
---------------------------------------------------------------
open radical prostatectomy SCHEDULED at Mayo Clinic 12/15/10

Packman
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 12/21/2010 8:53 PM (GMT -6)   
My wife and I had to travel over 500 miles after I had my Davinci Prostatechtomy done 5 days ago.  I had the surgery done on Thursday, left the hospital on Friday and traveled home the next day.  I wore the leg bag and we stopped every 1 to 1 1/2 hours so I could empty the bag and walk a little.  The only meds I was taking were ditropan and 1,000mg Tylenol.  It really wasn't a bad trip except for learning how to get my catheter and leg bag apparatus positioned so it wasn't uncomfortable.  The trip took 8 to 9 hours with the stops.  All things considered I didn't think the travel experience was too bad.
 
Packman
PSA April, 2010 4.45
Biopsy 9/23/10  Ca in 3 0f 9 cores
Gleason 6 (3+3)
Pca contained in prostate
4 lymph nodes removed-negative
Margins negative

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2680
   Posted 12/21/2010 9:21 PM (GMT -6)   
Congratulations Packman and Flyter.  You'll have interesting stories to share for years to come.  I hope you both have smooth and quick recoveries.  You both deserve something special from Santa this year, and so do your wives.
 
Welcome to HW.  Just about anything you encounter in your recovery has been dealt with by others already here, so don't hesitate to ask anything that you might be curious about.

Jazzman1
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 1162
   Posted 12/21/2010 9:25 PM (GMT -6)   
Hope your surgery went well, Flyter. Mayo is a first-class outfit.

I'm not sure I'd drive 12 hours to get a catheter removed; you might want to re-think that one. Any local uro can probably handle it fine.
Age 55
PSA: 8/09 2.69 -- 7/10 4.00 -- 8/10 4.11
--------------------------------------------------
Biopsy 8/10
Three of 14 cores positive: 10%, 60% & 80%
Stage T1C; Gleason 6
---------------------------------------------------------------
open radical prostatectomy at Cleveland Clinic 11/2/10
Post-surgical pathology: Gleason 7 (3+4)
Three positive margins; Stage T2c(+)
12/7/10 PSA: <.03

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25393
   Posted 12/21/2010 9:37 PM (GMT -6)   
Any careful nurse can remove the catheter, I wouldn't drive 12 hours back for just that.
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

Flytyer2
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 33
   Posted 12/22/2010 9:09 AM (GMT -6)   
Having made the 12 hour trip Sunday, followed by last night in hometown ER for urinary tract infection, I definitely would not do it again. (Hope the antibiotic kicks in soon) Rather, I would spend the entire time between surgery and catheter removal in the hospital/clinic town if could do it over. For us, the trip was not easy; we stopped every hour or so, and the catheter was uncomfortable most of the time. Live and learn.
Age 61
PSA: 12/09 7.3 (Proscar) -- 7/10 9.06 (Proscar)
--------------------------------------------------
Biopsy 9/13
One of 12 cores positive: <5%
Stage T1C; Gleason 3 + 3 = Gleason 6
---------------------------------------------------------------
open radical prostatectomy SCHEDULED at Mayo Clinic 12/15/10

knotreel
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2006
Total Posts : 654
   Posted 12/22/2010 10:18 AM (GMT -6)   
I think having the catheter removed locally may not best or even maybe not even an option. I my case and all the other that I know about, they perform sort of a urodymanics/xray proceedure where they check for leakage at the baldder neck where it is reconnected to your uretha ( or what's left of it). Others could certainly perform that test but there maybe some insurance problem? and more of concern, different protocols that the operating people use. From a legal standpoint there is a "chain of custody" sort of concern but aside from all that if it were me I would like to not have any other hands in play until after the first followup visit after the catheter trip. I consider that part of the cost for traveling to you choosen place.

Flytyer, sorry to hear things have been a little rough but it seems to be a tempory thing.
Packmnan congrats on your op.
Ron
06-08 1st biopsy neg psa 4
10-09 psa 5.5 2nd biopsy 1/12 pos. 10%, G(4+3) age 65
12-15-09 RRP Tulane NOLA Dr Lee
Path, 1%, clr marg, no EPE, no SVI, nodes cl, G(4+3)
100% incontinent after 3 mo. PT
ED, pre-op severe, post op total
10/10 Dr Boone, Baylor recomended AUS
AUS and IPP scheduled 1/11/11
post op psa's 0.04,<0.1,<0.1,0.01@12 mo.
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