What to ask the doctor after diagnosis.

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Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/14/2010 7:20 AM (GMT -6)   
Hi Fellow Cancer Guys,
 
I had my bone & CT scans yesterday and will be having my first pre-op consultation with Dr. Jensen, my Urologist on 12/15/10.   Dr. Jensen specializes in robotic surgery (over 1,000) and is well respected in his field.  Since this is my first post diagnosis consultation what are some good questions to ask?
 
 
 
PSA 3.2
Biopsy 24 cores 3 positive
Gleason 6
Age 57
Otherwise excellent health

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2667
   Posted 12/14/2010 10:53 AM (GMT -6)   
Viper,
This is a tough one to reply to. Everyone has different concerns. I sat down with my wife and we made a list of anything that happened to be on our minds, and that's what we talked about. Most of what we asked we would have known, had we been reading this forum at that time. Will you be his first surgery of the day (or his only surgery). How long do his patients usually stay in the hospital? If he does robotic surgery, is he prepared to transition to tradtional surgery should the need arise? Does he have reason to believe both nerve bundles can be spared? How do his patients do with continence and ED? How long can you expect to be catheterized? Who will be his assistant(s) during the procedure? Those are just a few things that come to mind.

Is this your first surgery? It was for me, and I was concerned about the breathing tube. As it turned out, I was "out" when it was inserted and also when it was removed, so it was a non-issue.

If you happen to have sleep apnea, I would mention that. I wanted the surgeon and the anesthetist to know.

Good luck to you. I'm sure you'll do fine.
Age 65
Dx in June 2010.
PSA gradually rising for 3 years to 6.2
Biopsy confirmed cancer in 6 of 12 cores, all on left side
Gleason 7 (3 + 4)
Bone scan, CT scan, rib x-rays all negative.
DaVinci surgery late August at Advocate Condell, Libertyville IL
Negative margins; negative seminal vesicles
5 brothers, ages 52-67 ; I'm the only one with PCa
Continence OK after 7 weeks. ED continues.

Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/14/2010 11:31 AM (GMT -6)   
Good advice, I hadn't thought of many of your suggested questions.  Thanks
 
I'm more worried about that tube inserted in the "little general" than anything else.  That's gotta hurt and be bothersome.  
The doc does some kind of special procedure I know nothing about.  It's kind of long but below is the procedure:
 
UltraprostatectomyTM is a method of precise excision of the prostate while leaving undisturbed in so far as possible the normal anatomical structures involved in urinary and sexual function.  The technique was developed by Dr. James Jensen based upon his experience with standard and robotic radical prostatectomy as described by Dr. Patrick Walsh and Dr. Mani Menon.  UltraprostatectomyTM is performed with the DavinciTM Robotic Surgical System and employs extreme magnification, precise surgical technique, and methods and processes which buffer and protect the nerves responsible for potency and continence during surgery.  Early results indicate this is the most advanced technique in Dr. Jensen's surgical arsenal early prostate cancer.    <!--"''"-->

Dr. James Jensen was an early adopter of the DavinciTM Robotic Surgical System.  He has now completed over 1,000 combined procedures and has thousands of hours of experience with Davinci TM and other Davinci TM surgery.  UltraprostatectomyTM has evolved from this surgical experience.  The procedure begins with careful dissection of the lymph nodes which drain the prostate, and this is completed with as little trauma as possible to the local pelvic structures.   The prostate is then mobilized from its surrounding tissues such as the rectum and the closely associated nerves responsible for sexual function and continence.  A neuroprotectant solution is used to mitigate the effects of electricity and trauma to the local nerves during this part of the dissection, as these nerves are particularly vulnerable during this phase of the operation.  The removal of the prostate then advances along the neurovascular structures using extreme magnification along with non-traumatic sharp dissection.  The external urinary sphincter is carefully preserved and supported using suture and fibrin sealants.  The internal urinary sphincter is then carefully reconstructed and calibrated and the two are combined and tabularized over a catheter.  A precise double layer anastamosis is then completed using running locking suture.  This process has resulted in dramatic and unprecedented results for some men.

<!--"''"-->


John T
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Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4229
   Posted 12/14/2010 11:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Viperguy,
Your statistics are very benign. With a G6 and only 3 of 24 cores positive and a very low psa the chances of your PC ever hurting you are very slim, compared to the almost certain side affects you will suffer from surgery. I'm very surprised that a bone and CT scan were even recommended as there was a zero chance that they would have shown anything.
First you need to edcuate yourself about low risk prostate cancer. "Invasion of the Prostate Snatchers" by Dr Mark Scholz is a good place to start. You can also google UCSF Active Survelience and John Hopkins Active Survelience to actually see what men in you catagory can expect. Also google Dr Lawrence Klotz for studies on AS. You have better than a 70% chance that your cancer will never progress to the stage that you will ever need treatment, and if it does progresss delayed treatment has similar results to getting treated immediately. Before you make a decision that will affect the rest of your life you owe it yourself to do a lot more research on low risk PC and the options that are availabe to you. Even if you do choose to be treated other options such as seeding have the same results as surgery with much fewer short and long term side affects. Since your cancer is not life threatning you must consider quality of life issues as your prime decision making. Men with higher gleason grades or advanced cancer have much fewer options than you do. All prostate cancer is not created equal and range from strains that are more like pusscats than tigers. It appears you have the *****cat variety. Prostate Cancer deaths from G6 cancers are extremely rare as it is very hard for a G6 to live outside the prostate and multiply. about 50% of men your age have some type of PC in their bodies and will never know it.
JohnT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

F8
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 3804
   Posted 12/14/2010 12:20 PM (GMT -6)   
four of us went to the pre-op with my urologist, a respected surgeon.  my in-laws and my wife accompanied me.  after the doctor explained everything to us i asked him for his recommendation, which was BT, HT and SGRT.  we were expecting him to say surgery since he does open prostate surgery and his partner does robotic.  he said it was my choice but he explained why he thought surgery was not the best option (60% chance PC was out of the capsule).  we were all impressed with the doctor and we agreed to his recommendation on the spot.
 
ed
age: 55
PSA on 12/09: 6.8
no symptoms, no prostate enlargement
12/12 cores positive....gleason 3+4 = 7
HT, BT and IGRT
received 3rd and last lupron shot 9/14/10

Ziggy9
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 981
   Posted 12/14/2010 12:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Viperguy I heartily endorse the advice John T gave you. I would add one thing ask your urologist how soon must you have a radical treatment. If he advices weeks to a couple of months go seek another urologist.

GTOdave
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 175
   Posted 12/14/2010 12:28 PM (GMT -6)   
Question for John T....
my stats are nearly identical to the OP.

I'm starting to get a case of cold feat, as my surgery is just over 2 weeks away.

You say that a Gleason 6 score may never kill, but won't it eventually progress upwards?

I am operating on the presumption that the cancer will eventually metastasize and minimize my ability to be cured.

Thoughts?

Dave
52 yr old, newly diagnosed. PSA 3.5, Gleason 6 with 3 of 4 top nodes (0%;1%;10%;1%) cancerous. Bottom 2 floors are clean.
Da Vinci surgery scheduled for 12/30/10

Ziggy9
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Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 981
   Posted 12/14/2010 12:37 PM (GMT -6)   
GTOdave said...
Question for John T....
my stats are nearly identical to the OP.

I'm starting to get a case of cold feat, as my surgery is just over 2 weeks away.

You say that a Gleason 6 score may never kill, but won't it eventually progress upwards?

I am operating on the presumption that the cancer will eventually metastasize and minimize my ability to be cured.

Thoughts?

Dave


If you're getting "cold" feet" you probably should cancel your surgery for now. This is major surgery and no one should go through with it until you have erased all doubts and better educated yourself on the disease. Plus all the options you may have and their possible effects. There are no do overs afterward. You may very well later do surgery but make sure you have no doubts when you do. With your numbers there is no rush for treatment. Take your time deciding.
Diagnosed 11/08/07 - Age: 58 - 3 of 12 @5%
Psa: 2.3 - 3+3=6 - Size: 34g -T-2-A

2/22/08 - 3D Mapping Saturation Biopsy - 1 of 45 @2% - Psa:2.1 - 3+3=6 - 28g after taking Avodart - Catheter for 1 day -Good Candidate for TFT(Targeted Focal Therapy) Cryosurgery(Ice Balls) - Clinical Research Study

4/22/08 - TFT performed at University of Colorado Medical Center - Catheter for 4 days - Slight soreness for 2 weeks but afterward life returns as normal

7/30/08 - Psa: .32
11/10/08 - Psa.62 -
April 2009 12 of 12 Negative Biopsy

2/16/10 12 of 12 Negative Biopsy

clocknut
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Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2667
   Posted 12/14/2010 12:57 PM (GMT -6)   
Is it just me, or does Viperguy's doc's description of  his technique sound like a typical DaVinci robotic surgery?  One thing that surprised me is that one of the first steps he describes is dissection of the lymph nodes.  Is that normally done when operating on a low-risk patient, unless once underway the doctor sees some sign that the disease has progressed?
 
Also, the narrative makes it sound as if he will definitely spare the nerve bundles.  I don't see how anyone can promise that until they see exactly how they are situated relative to the prostate and the cancer site. 
 
I asked my uro/surgeon afterwards if ANY surgeon could have saved my left nerve bundle.  His answer was, "Yes, if they didn't care if you have a recurrence."  He had told me prior to the surgery that he was concerned about those nerves because of the location of the palpable tumor, and it turned out he was correct.  The nerves had to go in order to perform the operation properly and with greatest efficacy.
 
So, here are two more questions I would ask him:  Isn't your "ultra" surgery just a fancy name for by the book Da
Vinci surgery, and how can you assure me the nerve bundles will be spared.  Oh, and why would you immediately dissect the lymph nodes?

F8
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 3804
   Posted 12/14/2010 12:57 PM (GMT -6)   
GTO Dave -- everyone gets cold feet. remember that there's a 40% probability that your actual pathology is worse than what your biopsy says. i would pick a treatment and proceed.

good luck!

ed
age: 55
PSA on 12/09: 6.8
no symptoms, no prostate enlargement
12/12 cores positive....gleason 3+4 = 7
HT, BT and IGRT
received 3rd and last lupron shot 9/14/10

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4229
   Posted 12/14/2010 1:07 PM (GMT -6)   
GTO Dave,

Only a few of G6's progress to a higher stage, about 30%, and most of these are thought to be a result of the biopsy missing the higher grade and not because of the progression of a G6. This is why it is important to get a follow up biopsy in a year or get a color doppler. Close monitoring by psa tests and follow up biopsies for the first three years should identify any increase in Gleason or a rapid rise in psa. Delayng treatment for three years or more does not alter the risks and you are much better able to determine how your individual PC is progressing and make a more informed decision about you treatment. The UCSF program in Active Survelience has a program in which diet, excercise and relaxing techniques are used in conjuction with close monitoring. No one in the program has shown any signs of progression thus far.
You have to be comfortable with AS and the only way you can do this is to look at all the information. Even with surgery and positive margins G3 cells rarely ever matastize because the cells can't establish themselves outside the prostate and grow very slowly. These cells are quite different from G4 and G5 cells which grow rapidily and can live outside the prostate and are very dangerous.
It's a very personal decision, but waiting in your case would not increase your risks. I basically waited 12 years and the results of treatment are the same, but because of advances in technology, especially radiation, the side affects are much more benign then they would have been 10 years ago, and I bought 10 years of zero side affects.
As I mentioned before I think that most patients overestimate low risk PC and underestimate high risk PC. This results in both overtreatment and undertreatment. The biology of your individual cancer should dictate the treatment and the best method of identifying the biology of low risk PC is to watch and see how it behaves over a two to three year period. If it progresses then treat it; if it shows no signs of progression then just keep monitoring. Until we develop a test that identifies agressive vs non agressive cancers the only way we can now identify them is to watch them closely over time to see which progress and which don't. And according to all the available data this waiting period does not alter the risk of a favorable treatment, but for the majority of men in this risk catagory it can mean no treatment.

JT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

Piano
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 847
   Posted 12/14/2010 3:59 PM (GMT -6)   
As a surgery guy who had no choice, I see the following advantages and disadvantages of surgery in low risk cases:

For surgery:
High probability of a "cure" -- similar to any other treatment
Reduces the small risk that your low grade PCa will turn into something worse
Treatment for anxiety

Against surgery:
Likely to leave you with some degree of incontinence and/or ED
Time out of commission
Pain and suffering
Something going seriously wrong (unlikely)

If I was a G6, I'd jump at the chance of AS with close monitoring of course. Sure there is a gamble involved, but there are gambles involved with all PCa treatments, including the surgery. As John T has pointed out, if you do AS, statistically you lose nothing by delaying treatment, but the gamble is that you might.

On the other hand, if you suffer from anxiety, then I see surgery as a valid option -- you are trading a chance of incontinence and ED for peace of mind. But still a gamble...
No symptoms; PSA 5.7; Gleason 4+5=9; cancer in 4/12 cores
Non-nerve-sparing RRP 7 March 2008 age 63
Organ confined, neg margins. Gleason downgrade 4+4=8
Fully continent
Bimix worked well; now using just VED
PSA undetectable at first but now 0.3, doubling time 7 months
No radiation but ADT coming unless I can slow down the rise...

Jazzman1
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 1160
   Posted 12/14/2010 8:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Of course, being a G6 pre-surgery is an estimate based on a small sample of tissue. I was a G6 until they removed my prostate and did the pathology. Then I was a G7.
Age 55
PSA: 8/09 2.69 -- 7/10 4.00 -- 8/10 4.11
--------------------------------------------------
Biopsy 8/10
Three of 14 cores positive: 10%, 60% & 80%
Stage T1C; Gleason 6
---------------------------------------------------------------
open radical prostatectomy at Cleveland Clinic 11/2/10
Post-surgical pathology: Gleason 7 (3+4)
Three positive margins; Stage T2c(+)
12/7/10 PSA: <.03

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3748
   Posted 12/14/2010 9:18 PM (GMT -6)   
Jazzman's experience is quite common...The true grade and extent of the cancer is just educated guesswork until the gland is surgically removed and examined in its entirety..

A TRUS 12-core Gleason 6 biopsy does not guarantee there is no Gleason 8 lurking...

Before I signed up for Active Surveillance, I would have a saturation biopsy performed...
Age 68.
PSA at age 55: 3.5, DRE normal. Advice, "Keep an eye on it".
age 58: 4.5
" 61: 5.2
" 64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
" 65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
" 66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
" 67 4.5 DRE "normal"
" 68 7.0 third biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RRP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9 SRT, HT, Dec

142
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 6949
   Posted 12/14/2010 9:47 PM (GMT -6)   
Viperguy,
 
Over on yananow there is a good list of questions that will give you a start:
 
 
 

Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/15/2010 5:32 AM (GMT -6)   
Some very good advice here.  I'm the type of person that would find it nearly impossible to live a normal life with the watchful waiting approach.  I want the cancer removed or nuked.  If the chance of G6 developing into a higher Gleason score (30% chance) I'm sure I'd be in the 30% bracket.  I have a very low threshold for pain and definitely full of stress with all options.  Will most likely go with robotic surgery and take my chances with the incontinence and ed.  I'll ask for some extra pain pills after the surgery LOL. 
 
Thanks to the forum I have a battery of questions for the urologist. 

TTaylor
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 12/15/2010 10:36 AM (GMT -6)   
I would suggest getting the book"Surviving Prostate Cancer" by Dr Patrick Walsh. He is the authority in this field having practiced for 30 years at John Hopkins University. You are wise to learn all you can before making a decision you can't go back on. We are here to help so let us hear from you as to your progress.
Stay well and blessed
TTaylor
Age 67. Robotic prostatectomy 10/26/2010, due for HT and RT in Janury 0f 2011. Eight of 12 lobes positive. Gleason Score 4+4=8, Margin envolvement was present with adipose tissue invasion and perineural invasion, glandular and stromal hyperplasia present,pT3 pNO and no evidence of metastatic adenocarcinoma.

Highwayman
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 148
   Posted 12/15/2010 10:47 AM (GMT -6)   
Viperguy,
just my 2 cents, my urologist told me that he would advise me to wait (AS) if my PSA had not been above ten. What ever you chose will be the right thing for you. Good luck.
Mike
Age 48 w/diagnosed
10/06 PSA 3.0
11/06 PSA FREE %13.2
10/07 PSA 3.4
12/07 Biopsy-neg
1/09 PSA 4.6
6/09 psa 5.8
2/10 psa 8.7
7/10 PSA 10.8
8/2010 3rd biopsy GG 3+3=6, one of eight cores -2%
Lap 10/22/10 Dr. Troxel
Path- Neg Margins, Gleason 6, Nerves spared, 85 gm
Cath out Nov 2, Dec 2nd 2 pads/day

Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/15/2010 5:08 PM (GMT -6)   
John T said...
GTO Dave,

Only a few of G6's progress to a higher stage, about 30%, and most of these are thought to be a result of the biopsy missing the higher grade and not because of the progression of a G6. This is why it is important to get a follow up biopsy in a year or get a color doppler. Close monitoring by psa tests and follow up biopsies for the first three years should identify any increase in Gleason or a rapid rise in psa. Delayng treatment for three years or more does not alter the risks and you are much better able to determine how your individual PC is progressing and make a more informed decision about you treatment. The UCSF program in Active Survelience has a program in which diet, excercise and relaxing techniques are used in conjuction with close monitoring. No one in the program has shown any signs of progression thus far.
You have to be comfortable with AS and the only way you can do this is to look at all the information. Even with surgery and positive margins G3 cells rarely ever matastize because the cells can't establish themselves outside the prostate and grow very slowly. These cells are quite different from G4 and G5 cells which grow rapidily and can live outside the prostate and are very dangerous.
It's a very personal decision, but waiting in your case would not increase your risks. I basically waited 12 years and the results of treatment are the same, but because of advances in technology, especially radiation, the side affects are much more benign then they would have been 10 years ago, and I bought 10 years of zero side affects.
As I mentioned before I think that most patients overestimate low risk PC and underestimate high risk PC. This results in both overtreatment and undertreatment. The biology of your individual cancer should dictate the treatment and the best method of identifying the biology of low risk PC is to watch and see how it behaves over a two to three year period. If it progresses then treat it; if it shows no signs of progression then just keep monitoring. Until we develop a test that identifies agressive vs non agressive cancers the only way we can now identify them is to watch them closely over time to see which progress and which don't. And according to all the available data this waiting period does not alter the risk of a favorable treatment, but for the majority of men in this risk catagory it can mean no treatment.

JT
 
We'll, my pre-surgical discussion went well.  No cancer in the bone or CAT scan.  The Doctor was very in tune with JT's comments.  The doc said I can wait another 6 months for another biopsy to see if there's progression.  Or wait a couple of months for the prostate to heal and schedule nerve sparing surgery.  He was totally against any type of radiation and indicated he has seen many fail.  The way he talked I could  wait 5 years before any treatment.  He also insisted I stop taking any anti-depresants and Xanax.  Seems these types of drugs contribute to post surgical incontenance and ED.

2009 PSA 2.2
2010 PSA 3.2
Biopsy 24 cores 3 positive
Gleason 6
Awaiting surgical consoltation

Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 4157
   Posted 12/15/2010 6:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Viper, glad your discussion went well.  Not to be a smarta** but - what a surprise (LOL)- a surgeon who does not recommend radiation!  Perhaps your consultation with the radiation oncologist will yield the same conclusions but then at least you will have more peace of mind that you have done your homework.
 
Tudpock (Jim)
 
Age 62 (64 now), G 3 + 4 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2/16 cancerous, 27cc. Brachytherapy 12/9/08. 73 Iodine-125 seeds. Procedure went great, catheter out before I went home, only minor discomfort. Everything continues to function normally as of 12/8/10. PSA: 6 mo 1.4, 1 yr. 1.0, 2 yr. .8. My docs are "delighted"! My journey:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=1305643&g=1305643#m1305643

Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/15/2010 7:41 PM (GMT -6)   
I thought the same thing too.   But the doc was not too quick to start slicing and dicing.  He suggested  I could go AS with a biopsy every six months or so to look at progression.   He gave me quite a lecture on the evils of any kind of radiation for someone with my condition.  In regards to radiation, the doc said it's the long term side effects making incontenience and ED more of a possibility than the robot operation.  I don't know, I'm sure a good radioligist has as many arguments the other way. 
 
Does anybody have a pdf file of "Surviving Prostate Cancer" that they are will to share?
 
Viperguy@suddenlink.net
2009 PSA 2.2
2010 PSA 3.2
Biopsy 24 cores 3 positive
Gleason 3 plus 3
Cancer believed to be contained in organ

fulltlt
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 264
   Posted 12/15/2010 9:17 PM (GMT -6)   
Viperguy,

There's a 99.9999% chance your local public library has "Surviving Prostate Cancer" or they can get it for you via interlibrary loan.

Not to be the second smart*** but I'd ask the doctor if he would be willing to put in writing and sign his name to all the "evils of radiation" to someone in our condition.

The open surgery advocates will argue that robotic is not as good as open surgery is for erectile function afterwards.
age 57 2/2010
PSA 8.2 2/2010
biopsy 2/2010 - 2 of 8 left & 2 of 8 right positive, Gleason 3+4=7
attended support group - advised to get a second opinion
second opinion on pathology from Johns Hopkins 4+4=8
PSA 15 4/2010
5 weeks IMRT 4/2010-6/2010 at Copley Hospital in Aurora, IL
91 palladium 103 seeds 7/2010 at Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL
PSA 3.97 10/2010
no ED or incontinence

Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/16/2010 4:57 AM (GMT -6)   
Fulltit you are not being a smart ***. You are telling it like it is and I appreciate that. The "evils of radiation" is a term I made up based on the docs analysis. I have a friend with the seeds who is 5 years out and doing fantastic. From what I have read, radiation is a great treatment for some men.
2009 PSA 2.2
2010 PSA 3.2
Biopsy 24 cores 3 positive
Gleason 3 plus 3
Cancer believed to be contained in organ

fulltlt
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 264
   Posted 12/16/2010 8:44 AM (GMT -6)   
Viperguy said...
Fulltit you are not being a smart ***. You are telling it like it is and I appreciate that. The "evils of radiation" is a term I made up based on the docs analysis. I have a friend with the seeds who is 5 years out and doing fantastic. From what I have read, radiation is a great treatment for some men.


The second to last letter in my handle is the letter "L", not "i". There's a story to my handle. My initials are TLT. Guys at work started to call me tilt because I used my initials for my login. When looking around for a handle that no one used back in the early days of the internet I came up with fulltilt but words correctly spelled were already taken. The handle fulltlt wasn't used anywhere and so far every time I have registered on something new it has never already been taken.

Yeah, the uro/surgeon that I went to for my biopsy gave me the same story. After I had made my decision to have seed implants at the Chicago Prostate Cancer Center I went back to the original uro/surgeon for my final appointment with him. When I told
him what I had decided he said, "I do that too", meaning he did seed implants as well. This was after he had told me all the as you call it "evils of radiation". mad
age 57 2/2010
PSA 8.2 2/2010
biopsy 2/2010 - 2 of 8 left & 2 of 8 right positive, Gleason 3+4=7
attended support group - advised to get a second opinion
second opinion on pathology from Johns Hopkins 4+4=8
PSA 15 4/2010
5 weeks IMRT 4/2010-6/2010 at Copley Hospital in Aurora, IL
91 palladium 103 seeds 7/2010 at Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL
PSA 3.97 10/2010
no ED or incontinence

Post Edited (fulltlt) : 12/16/2010 7:47:20 AM (GMT-7)


Viperguy
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2010
Total Posts : 259
   Posted 12/16/2010 4:30 PM (GMT -6)   
FullTLT, sorry for the mixup on the name (LOL).  I thought you were into well endowed ladies, but I wasn't going to say anything about that (LOL). 
2009 PSA 2.2
2010 PSA 3.2
Biopsy 24 cores 3 positive
Gleason 3 plus 3
Cancer believed to be contained in organ
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