Prostate Cancer Survivors and Walking Study

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NEIrish
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 1/10/2011 6:55 AM (GMT -6)   
FYI - a study supporting all the guys here who always say "walk, walk, walk!"  Keep it up!
 
Prostate cancer survivors can literally walk themselves to a lower risk of dying of the disease -- with some men achieving an almost 50% lower mortality risk, data from a large cohort study showed.

The study, involving more than 2,000 survivors of nonmetastatic prostate cancer, found those who walked at a normal to brisk pace for at least 90 minutes a week had a 46% lower mortality hazard -- and three or more hours of vigorous physical activity each week lowered the hazard to 49%, according to Stacey A. Kenfield, ScD, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues.

Walking had a nonsignificant but inverse relationship with prostate cancer-specific mortality, whereas three hours of vigorous activity was associated with a statistically significant 61% reduction in the hazard, Kenfield and co-authors wrote online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"Our results suggest that among men with prostate cancer, moderate physical activity may improve overall survival, whereas a grater amount of activity is necessary to improve prostate cancer-specific survival," the authors concluded.

"Mechanistic studies and randomized trials of physical activity interventions are needed in prostate cancer survivors to determine whether physical activity reduces prostate cancer progression and what regimens are optimal," they added.

The current findings add to data from a previous report from the same group, showing an association between vigorous physical activity and a significant reduction in the diagnosis of advanced prostate cancer (Arch Intern Med. 2005;165:1005-1010).

That association led the team to hypothesize that vigorous physical activity might also reduce the risk of prostate cancer-specific and overall mortality in survivors of the disease, the most frequently diagnosed form of cancer among U.S. men.

To test their hypothesis, Kenfield and colleagues analyzed data from 2,705 men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. All participants had a diagnosis of nonmetastatic prostate cancer and were followed from 1990 to 2008. Follow-up included assessment of leisure-time activity every two years.

The questionnaire required the men to characterize the type, frequency, and duration of physical activity, using descriptions provided by the investigators. Each type of activity listed on the questionnaire had an associated metabolic equivalent task (MET) value. Self-reported activity was validated by one-week activity diaries that the men provided four times during follow-up.

During follow-up, 548 of the 2,705 men died, including 112 deaths resulting from prostate cancer. The median follow-up from first post-diagnosis assessment was 9.7 years for survivors and 7.8 years for men who died.

Walking accounted for 36% of total weekly MET-hours and 52% of total physical activity time. Heavy outdoor work accounted for 22% of weekly MET-hours and bicycling for 10%. Vigorous activity (MET value ≥6) contributed 37% of total MET-hours and 24% of total physical activity time.

A multivariable analysis showed that men who reported any physical activity had a lower risk of all-cause mortality (P<0.001) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=0.04).

Men who walked at least 90 minutes a week at a normal to brisk pace had a significant reduction in the all-cause mortality hazard (HR 0.54, 0.41 to 0.71) compared with men who walked shorter durations at a more leisurely pace.

Walking at a normal or brisk pace reduced the hazard for prostate cancer-specific mortality by 23% to 56%, depending on total walking time -- but the differences between leisurely or no walking at all did not reach statistical significance.

Vigorous physical activity modestly increased the overall-survival benefit observed with walking (HR 0.51, 0.36 to 0.72 versus ≤1 hour) and also reduced the hazard for prostate cancer-specific mortality as compared with one hour or less of vigorous activity (HR 0.39, P=0.03).

Kenfield and co-authors cited several limitations to the study, including that activity was self-reported and limited to a subset of common activities, a study cohort that was homogenous by profession, and their assessment of physical activity was a better measure of vigorous activity than of nonvigorous activity.

Even with those limitations, the group wrote that they "still observed a significant trend with increasing nonvigorous activity for all-cause mortality.


Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 1/10/2011 7:30 AM (GMT -6)   

It was 28º F this morning and very slight drizzel/sleet when I was walking. Only did one lap around the neighborhood instead of two.

Driving into the office sure got the ol heart rate up... So I think I'm even.

 


60Michael
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 2222
   Posted 1/10/2011 7:43 AM (GMT -6)   
Good article Irish, and I hope that they are right about excercise.
Michael

Casey59
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 3172
   Posted 1/10/2011 10:26 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for posting this, NEIrish. It really is incredible how much benefit a moderate amount of exercise can yield...emphasis on the word MODERATE.  Everyone can find the amount of exercise that is uniquely appropriate for themselves, personally.

I hope that your thread helps motivate some men (or women) here at HW to look closely in the mirror at the amount of exercise the are, or are not, getting.

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 1/10/2011 10:57 AM (GMT -6)   
No physical therapy today scheduled, but geez, been outside twice trying to deal with 9" of wet snow, a rare event here in western South Carolina. Forgot how hard it was to shovel a ton of snow. Trying to get ready to drive my Nurse wife to work in a couple of hours. So far, not a single car has come down our road.

I like walking, and look forward in the near future to be able to use our town's walking track, which is about 1/4 mile from my house. Still a bit wobbly on a cane most times.

David in SC
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

compiler
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 7203
   Posted 1/10/2011 11:59 AM (GMT -6)   
My gym is about 0.8 miles from my house. In NICER weather, part of my workout includes walking briskly to and from the gym. Unfortunately, that probably won't happen until late March/April. It was 3 degrees this morning. We may get up to almost 20 today.
 
Michigan weather sucks from late November through March!
 
Mel

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 1/10/2011 12:06 PM (GMT -6)   
the 1/4 miles to our track, means walking down a long, steep hill all the way, thats the easy part, and of course, walking up a long steep hill on the way back, not easy when you are dead tire. i notice most people drive and park.
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

geezer99
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 1/10/2011 12:52 PM (GMT -6)   
A very important part of this data is that after a PCa diagnosis 80% of those who died did so from something other than PCa
AND
Exercise protected against all causes of death. If PCa causes you to change your lifestyle, it may just end up prolonging your life!

NEIrish
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 1/11/2011 9:38 AM (GMT -6)   

Casey et al:  One foot in front of the other.  Sounds sooo easy when put that way, doesn't it?  A simple but effective mantra.  No pills, supplements or magic food necessary.   Is there any other reputable study that shows results with percentages for non-progression so significant?

Great good luck to all who take it to heart and slog along.  NEIrish will be part of Casey59's new post on activity level.  Today, it's using the wheel- barrow to bring in several loads of firewood for the woodstove - expecting around a possible foot or more of snow tonight with winds that might cut off our power. 

 


Casey59
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 3172
   Posted 1/11/2011 11:44 AM (GMT -6)   
That's the spirit!

tryin2helpmydad
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 12
   Posted 1/18/2011 1:24 PM (GMT -6)   
using a mini-rebounder indoors to simulate walking activity has been shown to boost lymphatic system
my dad's metastasized prostate through bones
diagnosed dec.22 2010
on 1st 3month zoladex injection + celadex
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