Unbelievable!!!!!

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Susan R
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 1/12/2011 3:50 PM (GMT -6)   
Opinions wanted!!!

My 39 year old husband was dx right before Christmas with PC. This dx was based on 1 core being positive from his biopsy. His films were viewed and then send off to the Armed Forces Pathology Institute for 2nd opinion. He was given a Gleason of 6. Based on the dx, we have talked to the URO, a surgical DR and a radiation oncologist to make the best decision. We have decided to have the Da Vinci and this is scheduled for Feb 2, 2011. OK, so what do I need your help with if the decision has been made????? Based on bone scan, CT and chest Xray, cancer has not spread.

Michael (husband) took another PSA on Friday along with a bunch of other blood tests for the military....the URO called today with the results of the PSA. Take a deep breath......his PSA was a 2.74. To give you an idea.....his last PSA before the biopsy was a 10.

So, we know the cancer is there, albeit caught in the very first stages and very slow growing. Do we stick to the surgery, or what? I have had lumps in my breasts and had them removed and they were "pre-cancerous", why in the world would we leave the mass that we KNOW is cancer in my husbands body??? But.....with the severity of the surgery and the possible long term effects, maybe we should just watch it. But....as his URO said today, if we could give you a definate of when the cancer would grow, then I would wait. But since we cant leaving it in is risky. I know there is a bunch of people who believe that "watchful waiting" is right for them, but it hasnt really made sense to us. I think we are probably going to stick to the plan, but wanted some input and thoughts from other people....we may be missing some train of thought that we should address.

Thank you for your time
Susan

medved
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 1096
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:00 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Susan. Michael may decide to go forward with the surgery, but I would not rush into anything immediately. If it were me, the first thing I would do is get the biopsy slides re-read by one of the leading prostate cancer pathologists. You could try Bonkoff (Germany, but does it all by mail so its not a problem) or Oppenheimer (TN) or Epstein (MD) or Bostwick (VA). (Search the forum and you will find contact info). These guys are all experts at reading prostate biopsy slides and they often come back with different findings than the original readings. It would be well worthwhile to get an expert opinion from one of those pathologists before making any surgery decision. Best wishes, Medved
Age 46.  Father died of p ca. 
My psa starting age 40: 1.4, 1.3, 1.43, 1.74, 1.7, 1.5, 1.5
 

Arnie
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 372
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:12 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Susan........I don't have the broad knowledge of some of the guys here, but you should probably send your biopsy results for a 2nd opinon to an Epstein at Johns Hopkins or another reputable lab. You want to make sure that the one core is indeed one core, and that it is definitely a Gleason 6. Another consideration for a watchful waiting approach is age. As a general rule of thumb, the older you are, the more appropriate it becomes. At 39, there are a lot of years to watch and wait. If you do opt for treatment, make sure you're not planning on children in the future, because your husband will be rendered sterile if he opts for surgery. You of course can have semen frozen..........the drop in PSA after biopsy is not uncommon. He could have had a small infection, you may have had sex close to the time he was biopsied, etc.---and, PSA's come down for no apparent reason. I was diagnosed with a PSA of 3.9, and 3 months after the biopsy, and right about the time I was pulling the trigger on treatment option, my PSA came back at 2.4......bottom line is you have plenty of time to make a decision on treatment/no treatment, and if treatment, what kind of treatment. Take the time and educate and research as much as you can in order to make the most informed decision possible.
 
Arnie in DE

ralfinaz
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 735
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Susan and Michael,
A little more information on the biopsy would be useful. How many cores were positive? How much of the positive cores was cancer? The normal instinct when diagnosed is to do something about it. On the other hand learning about options and deciding from a knowledge base is always a good strategy. Take your time and learn. A 3rd opinion on the biopsy material by an expert PCa pathologist as suggested by Medved’s post is ideal.

Many men these days who qualify for Active Surveillance delay treatment and learn about the disease without major risk. In any case the treatment/no treatment decision is very personal and dependent on the patient’s preferences.
The fact that PSA is now much lower is an indication that the original, more elevated PSA was not all related to cancer.
Wish you both the very best!
Surviving prostate cancer since 1992. RP; Orchiectomy (OUCH!)
GS (4 + 2); bilateral seminal vesicle invasion; tumor attached to rectal wall. Last PSA September, 2010: <0.1 ng/ml
Laughter is the best medicine!

tatt2man
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 2842
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:39 PM (GMT -6)   
my initial patient-to-patient response would be - no need to rush

- time to do a lot more research - to seek out the BEST treatment for your husband.
1 out of _______ cores - _____% of core cancerous - gleason __6__
first PSA __10__ -second PSA ___2.74 ... -third PSA _____

-would recommend another PSA bloodwork - any possibility of an UTI ?
REMINDER- for 2-3 days prior no activity involving the prostate - no sex - with you or by himself - horseback riding - motorcycling - or a doctor's finger up his butt ..just to name a few ... . that can all elevate a PSA and give a false reading...

-check out the links at the top of the page - they can help direct you, your husband and your medical care to the BEST treatment for him - whether that be AS, RT, RP.... just to name a few in this confusing alphabet.

-wishing you all the best.
hugs
BRONSON
Age: 55 - gay with spouse of 14 years, Steve
location: Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
PSA: 10/06/09 - 3.86
Biopsy: 10/16/09- 6 of 12 cancerous samples, Gleason 7 (4+3)
Radical Prostatectomy: 11/18/09
Pathology: pT3a -Gleason 7 -extraprostatic extension -perineural invasion -prostate weight -34.1 gm
PSA: 04/08/10 -0.05 -Zero Club
PSA: 09/23/10 -0.05 -Zero Club
PSA: 03/12/11 - TBA

Post Edited (tatt2man) : 1/12/2011 3:43:31 PM (GMT-7)


LV-TX
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 966
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Susan,

Can you clear something up. You said he was diagnosed right before Christmas, yet had another PSA test on this last Friday.

That seems like a very short time from biopsy to have another reading. The biopsy will cause inflamation of the prostate for several weeks, something on the order of around 8 weeks. This would cause the psa to be still elevated if done in less time than that.

One core in 12 with a Gleason 6 makes this an low risk situation right now. Personally I would recommend to wait and hold off on the surgery. Even if the cancer should progress, there is still plenty of time to head off to surgery down the road.

I would hate to see a young man go the surgery route when it is possible the cancer is the indolent variety. A minimum of three tests 3 months apart would be required to know for sure if the cancer is progressing or not. And going from a 10 down to a 2.74 is enough reason to wait. There are many other reasons for elevated psa. Remember psa is NOT cancer specific.
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

Robotic Surgery Sept 2008
PSA increasing since January 2009
Current PSA .44 (29 months)
PSA Doubling time approx. 6 months

An38
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 1148
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:46 PM (GMT -6)   

Hi Susan,

 

Welcome to the club that no one wants to join. I imagine that you would be shocked by your husband’s diagnosis – 39 is a very young age for this type of cancer. But you are very lucky that he tested for it so early in his life, many men don’t start testing till a decade later.

 

There are a few things I would do before making a final decision as the consequences of your choices are long lasting.

 

1)    Get a expert to review your biopsy slides. This may seem like a time wasting exercise but what I have learnt pretty early is that you really want someone who has looked at 1000s or 10000s of prostate cancers to look at your biopsy slides. You garden variety pathologist deals with hundreds of diseases and cancers and therefore tends to be tentative with his/her diagnosis. I suggest you look up Epstein or Bostwick laboratories and get a second opinion.

2)    Read, read and read some more. Two good books are written by Patrick Walsh (Guide to surviving prostate cancer) and Dr Stephan Strum (a primer on prostate cancer).

3)    We are not doctors here but a PSA of 10 seems high for someone with such a small amount of cancer. The vast majority of people without prostate issues would have a PSA of less than 2. I would try to find out whether this high PSA is caused by infection, by BPH or by cancer not seen by the biopsy. A good first step would be to get a free PSA test which can help you work this out.  People with BPH tend to have a high free % PSA. A course of antibiotics may help determine whether the PSA is caused by prostatitis (if it is the PSA should drop). In your husband’s case it would seem prostatitis was a factor as the PSA did drop so dramatically.

4)    There are broadly three options available to you, surgery, radiation (including seeds) or active surveillance. My personal view is that at age 39 I would considering the first two following confirmation of your status. Some people are lucky enough to have an indolent version of the disease and there have been studies showing that if you fit a set of criteria and follow strict guidelines on monitoring that you would not have a worse outcome than if you went into definitive treatment. However in the case of your husband, who is probably not halfway through his life so even slow growing disease would probably affect him at some stage.

  

Regards,

An
Husband's age: 52. Sydney Australia.
Family history: Mat. grandfather died of PC at 72. Mat. uncle died of PC at 60. He has hereditary PC.
PSA: Aug07 - 2.5|Feb08 - 1.7|Oct09 - 3.67 (free PSA 27%)|Feb10 - 4.03 (free PSA 31%) |Jun10 - 2.69. DRE normal.
Biopsy 28Apr10: negative for a diagnosis of PC however 3 focal ASAPs “atypical, suspicious but not diagnostic” for PC. Review of biopsy by experienced pathologist, 1/12 core: 10% 3+3 (left transitional), 1/12 core: ASAP (left apex)
Nerve sparing RP, 20Aug10 with Dr Stricker. Post-op path: 3+4 (ISUP 2005). Neg (margins, seminal vesicles, extraprostatic extension). Multifocal, with main involvement in the fibro-muscular zone. T2C.
Post RP PSA,
Lab 1: Sep10 – 0.02|Nov10 – 0.03|Dec10 – 0.03
Lab 2: Nov 10 - 0.01|Dec10 – 0.01

Post Edited (An38) : 1/12/2011 5:11:33 PM (GMT-7)


zoph3388
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 1/12/2011 4:47 PM (GMT -6)   
Its your decision and whatever it is you live with it. Nobody here should be telling you what to do. We all made our decisions based on what was best for us. Whatever you choose- just make sure your decision is done together so no one gets blamed if things go wrong.

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2667
   Posted 1/12/2011 5:02 PM (GMT -6)   
Susan, I remember your earlier posts from last December. What's your husband's current status regarding Army retirement? Has he set a date? Is his military retirement driving the February date for surgery?

Is the Army limiting his options in any way? Will they let him retire without getting the PCa treated?

In December, you were concerned that the military wanted him to have the surgery performed at a smalll facility with a not-so-good reputation. Has that changed?

At age 39, I think I would like to get a second or third opinon regarding the biopsy results before proceeding to surgery, but pleae remember that I'm not a doctor.....just a guy who has had a run-in with PCa.

Susan R
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 1/12/2011 5:39 PM (GMT -6)   
His Army status does put a time constraint on the decision. I am still concerned about the small facility, but have talked to lots of people in the medical community who know or know about the surgeon, and all have had really good things to say. So, we feel a bit better about that.

I am not asking for medical advice. I am just trying to get differing thoughts, so to make sure that we are thinking about all the possibilities and options. And since we have never been through this before, we are not even sure we know what to be thinking about (the small stuff- the personal stuff that you only learn about once you've been through it)

Thank you to all who have taken the time to respond, we appreciate the time and effort!!

BillyMac
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 1858
   Posted 1/12/2011 5:42 PM (GMT -6)   
zoph3388 said...
Its your decision and whatever it is you live with it. Nobody here should be telling you what to do. We all made our decisions based on what was best for us. Whatever you choose- just make sure your decision is done together so no one gets blamed if things go wrong.

An interesting response to somebody asking for an opinion


Susan,
The general consensus here I feel would be to tread warily. Your husband's biopsy showed very little tumour (1 out of 12) and Gleason 6 (currently the lowest rating). Do you know the percentage of tumour in that core. Alarm bells should probably sound concerning the drastic fall in PSA ------- that is more indicative of prostatitis and its response to antibiotics (which I assume were given post biopsy). My inclination would be to have the slides looked at by one of the specialist pathologists mentioned to confirm the diagnosis and then decide the next course of action. Even if tumour is confirmed prostate cancer can be somewhat different to most other tumours in that it may or may not progress. 39 is young to have to make a decision such as this ---------- treatment does come at a physical cost so it's important that you learn all you can about the disease before making such a profound decision. Even if tumour was confirmed active surveillance over the next couple of years is not out of the question.
Here is a list of the journey of others in the same age bracket ------- click on their names for their personal story:

www.yananow.org/Chart-Ageu50.htm#40

Bill

Post Edited (BillyMac) : 1/12/2011 5:12:36 PM (GMT-7)


Putt
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 154
   Posted 1/12/2011 5:43 PM (GMT -6)   
The words "watchful waiting" have been replaced with Active Survaillance and was changed for a reason. AS means being proactive with continous testing until a predetermined point indicates a procedure that is appropiate.

In other words, your current information is lacking any real basis to immediately accept surgery as a fix. Keep in mind there are side effects to any type of treatment, and with his young age, he could be looking at 40 - 50 years ahead of him with a diminished quality of life because of the SE's.

Therefore, take a break, do your research, get second opinions outside the world of the VA. No reflection against them, but there are more qualified experts available outside. There is no immediate threat that is going to be any worse, a couple of months down the road. Monitor the PSA monthly, and schedule another biopsy, 6 months down the road. Then you might have a whole different attitude as to what and when to do something.
PSA at Dx 105 at age 68, 4/04. ADT (Lupron only), RRP, 5/04. Gleason 4+5=9, Staged pT3bc NO MO, 3D rad, 40 treatments, 8/04. PSA 1/05 <0.01. ADT till 7/07. PSA 0.03 12/08, 0.07 4/09, 0.13 8/09, 0.19 12/09, 0.30 4/10, 8/10 0.42, 12/10 47. Will start ADT3 after PSA reaches 1.2.

An38
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 1148
   Posted 1/12/2011 6:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Susan,

I don't think its is the size of the facility but the experience and skill of the surgeon that is the issue.
The surgeon needs to have had a good reputation and done more than 500 surgeries (preferable more than a 1000). Just having a good reputation is not enough as the rate of incontinance varies from 3% to 50% depending on the skill of the surgeon.

If the surgeon you are looking at does not have the experience required I would find another. Your husband needs the best possible surgeon you can afford - he will need the smallest amount of side effects possible as at 39 he has a long time to live.

Regards,
An

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4229
   Posted 1/12/2011 6:22 PM (GMT -6)   
Susan,
There is no need to hurry. The stats you listed indicate a very low risk form of prostate cancer. You can delay treatment for quite a while and see if his psa creeps up. Please look into Active Survelience. "Invasion of the Prostate Snatchers" by Dr Mark Scholz has a few good sections on AS. Don't make a life altering decision based on fear. You have plenty of time to research things.
JohnT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2667
   Posted 1/12/2011 6:37 PM (GMT -6)   
I have tremendous respect for An38 and the others posting here, but allow me to represent a minority opinion.
 
You have said that you have talked to other medical people who have had good things to say about your surgeon.  It's common on this site for people to say "find someone who has done a thousand of these surgeries."
 
If a guy performs two of these a day, five days a week (but most only do surgeries a couple of days each week and have office calls the other days), it would take five years to approach a thousand surgeries.  If they're doing three a day, I would not want to be their third four-hour surgery of the day.  We all know this is an extremely precise surgery, and I simply would refuse to be the third, or especially the fourth surgery of the day.  The numbers assume he never takes a vacation, doesn't observe holidays, and so forth. 
 
My surgeon has done about 50.  He's in his 60's and has had a strong reputation for many years as a uro-surgeon, having done God knows how many open prostatectomies before adding the DaVinci procedure to his repertoire about four years ago.  He would have done my surgery either way and the decision for DaVinci was entirely mine.  His excellent reputation continues undiminished.  He's good, and everyone in the area knows it.  I don't see how I could have had a better outcome at Johns Hopkins.
 
So, I tend to place an asterisk over the requirement for a thousand surgeries.  Obviously there are exceptions to that rule.  I suspect that the surgeons with national reputations were as good after 20 or 30 Da Vinci surgeries as they are after hundreds.  I would ask him, though, what his success rates are with ED and with continence, and I would insist on honest answers to both questions, as well as how he defines continence and how he defines return to potency.
 
I know my opinion is a minority opinion, but you asked for a variety of opinions, and this is mine.
 
 

lifeguyd
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 677
   Posted 1/12/2011 6:41 PM (GMT -6)   
 
After reading your posts here and previously, it is my opinion that military doctors might have made a terrible mistake.  My advice would be DO NOTHING until further diagnostic  work has been done.  You are both too young to suffer the possible erectile and urinary damage that will surely come with surgery or radiation.
 
There is no rush.  Believe me and the others who post here.  Stop and get it right.  You are talking about your future.  I am much older than you two, but every day since I discovered I was really impotent... I wake upset and disturbed about my erectile problems.  I was a Gleason 8 and might have considered other solutions if I could have retained my ability to get erections.

Post Edited (lifeguyd) : 1/12/2011 5:50:32 PM (GMT-7)


Newporter
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 225
   Posted 1/12/2011 7:03 PM (GMT -6)   
If you choose surgery, please read Dr. Patrick Welch's book. Surgery side effects critically depend on the surgeon's skills. The difference could be very dramatic. My surgeon does 4 to 5 surgeries a week. I met three other patients who had surgery around the same time I did mine, non of us has any incontinence after surgery (I did not ask them about ED).

A good surgeon should be willing to answer questions regarding his statistics and success rates:

1. Total number of surgeries done, number done in a year, a month, a week and in the last three months
2. Percentage of cases having a positive margin
3. Percentage of cases having incontinence
4. Percentage of cases having ED
5. Percentage of cases having Bio-Chemical Recurrence

Good luck to you and your spouse.
65 Dx June-2010 PSA: 10.7, biopsy: Adenocarcinoma, 1 core Gleason 6, 3 cores atypia; Clinical stage T2; CT, Bone Scan, MRI all negative

8-23-10 Robotic RP; Pathology: Negative margins; Lymph nodes, Seminal Vesicle clear; PNI present; multiple Adenocarcinoma sites Gleason 3+3 with tertiary Gleason grade 4. Stage: pT2,N0,Mx,R0

Catheter out 8-30-10 full continent, potent 1mo. Sept PSA: <.1

Susan R
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 1/12/2011 7:12 PM (GMT -6)   
Thank you so much for the YAYANOW link, that is exactly what we were looking for, but unable to find on my own. Fantastic!

JNF
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 3767
   Posted 1/12/2011 7:20 PM (GMT -6)   
It appears that you have plenty of time to make decisions and to get multiple opinions. The fact that you are leaving the military should not force a decision. After the military he should still have VA access. I assume that he may pursue another career. If that is correct, and many major employers welcome the retired military, he may be covered by very good group medical insurance. Thus, making a decision based on current medical insurance may not be well advised.

Please do not make a decision on treatment until you have consulted with a medical oncologist, an urologist and a radiation oncologsit....and read a few books.....and listened to people on this board.

Best wishes and please thank your husband for his service to our country. We very much appreciate it.

livinadream
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1382
   Posted 1/12/2011 7:58 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for posting Susan and so glad you find us. I have read some of the responses and they are all good and heartfelt. I think someone wrote that you should do what makes you guys comfortable. In your situation there are several options that are all good. AS is a great choice due to the stage of the cancer. Surgery would be ok too due to age however there are some side effects that go along with that. Radiation would be ok. Point being Susan in my unprofessional opinion whatever you chose will be right. If you do have the option of waiting and getting a couple more PSA tests over the next few months I do think it would make the picture a little clearer.
Stay in touch my friend
peace and love
Dale
I was 45 at diagnosis with PSA of 16.3
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/dalechildress

My gleason score from prostate was 4+5=9 and from the lymph nodes (3 positive) was 4+4=8
I had 44 IMRT's. Scheduled to have a radical on July 11th, 2007, surgery was aborted when it was discovered it had spread to the lymph nodes.
I was on Lupron, Casodex, and Avodart for two years with my last shot March 2009.
My Oncology hospital is The Cancer Treatment Center of America in Zion IL
PSA July of 2007 was 16.4
PSA May of 2008 was.11
PSA July 24th, 2008 is 0.04
PSA Dec 16th, 2008 is .016
PSA Mar 30th, 2009 is .02
PSA July 28th 2009 is .01
PSA OCt 15th 2009 is .11
PSA Jan 15th 2010 is .13
PSA April 16th of 2010 is .16
PSA July 22nd of 2010 is .71
PSA Sept of 2010 is .71
cancer in 4 of 6 cores
92%
80%
37%
28%

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3748
   Posted 1/12/2011 8:19 PM (GMT -6)   
Use the internet (this board is a good place to start) and determine the the top five Da Vinci surgeons, the big guns at the big cancer centers. Write them a short handwritten letter explaining your situation and wishes.

You might be AMAZED at the responses you will receive..I could be wrong, but I think it would be worth the effort..
Age 68.
PSA at age 55: 3.5, DRE normal. Advice, "Keep an eye on it".
age 58: 4.5
" 61: 5.2
" 64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
" 65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
" 66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
" 67 4.5 DRE "normal"
" 68 7.0 third biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RRP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9 SRT, HT NOW

Sleepless09
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 1267
   Posted 1/12/2011 8:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Susan, Michael, lots of good advice in this thread. The top bit as far as I'm concerned, is to get a second read of your slides by someone who does a lot of prostate tissue work. The "name" pathologists listed are, of course, excellent, but if you don't use one of them for a second read, then be sure whoever is doing it does lots of prostate readings.

Next, and provided the second read matches the first, you do have time, but there is no get-out-of-jail-free card with PCa. All options have upsides, and downsides and those can and do vary from patient to patient.

At 39 it's not unreasonable if Michael's not a smoker, and doesn't do wild sport stuff, or drink and drive, etc., that he can look forward to 50 plus years of life left. The goal I'd be going for is "cure."

I wish you both well. I'll look forward to future posts and learning what you decide to do.

Sheldon AKA Sleepless
Age 67 in Apil '09 at news of 4 of 12 cores positive T2B and Gleason 3 + 3 and 5% to 25% PSA 1.5
Re-read of slides in June said Gleason 3 + 4 same four cores 5% to 15%
June 29 daVinci prostatectomy, Dr. Eric Estey, at Royal Alexandra Hospital Edmonton one night stay
From "knock out" to wake up in recovery less than two hours.  Actual surgery 70 minutes
Flew home to Winnipeg on July 3 after 5 nights in Ramada Inn  ---  perfect recovery spot!
Catheter out July 9
Final pathology is 3 + 4 Gleason 7, clear margins, clear nodes, T2C, sugeron says report is "excellent"
 
Oct 1st 09 -- dry at night, during day some stress issues.
Oct 31st padless 24/7 
 
First post op PSA Sept 09  less than 0.02
PSA on Oct 23, 2009 less than 0.02
PSA on Jan 8, 2010  less than 0.02
PSA on April 9, 2010 less than 0.02 
PSA on July 9, 2010 (one year) less than 0.02
  

GOP
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 657
   Posted 1/13/2011 6:10 AM (GMT -6)   
Susan, my diagnosis in 08 was similar to your husband....actually, it appears that mine may have been a bit further advanced. Even at that, it was labeled an 'insignificant cancer'. It wasn't hurting anything, and it wasn't going anywhere at that time. My doctor said I could have it removed or 'watch' it until it became 'significant'. He also said that some people cannot deal with that...knowing that they have cancer. I had no problem with it. It actually made me appreciate life much more. At any rate, I was able to watch for 2 years before there was a bit of a change. My doctor wanted to do surgery. I did not. I have done a lot of research as everyone here has, and I found few post surgery patients whom I envied. All I wanted was an 'objective' professional opinion, but that is very difficult to find: cutters cut, bakers bake, seeders seed. Through it all, I chose to have brachy, and have no regrets, but most importantly, I discovered that each of us must make our own decision. I have a friend who has a very similar diagnosis as your husband. I have talked to him about brachy, but his doctor has him so terrified that he feels open surgery is the only answer. I have tried to suggest that he at least consider other options, but this guy has him convinced that surgery is necessary..and soon. He is scheduled for the radical open prostatectomy on Feb 11.
No one has 'your' answer, but many have echoed that at this point, time is on your side. Use it to make a decision based on medical fact and quality of life post surgery. Just don't let anyone scare you into a decision because I'm afraid that many professionals do just that.
God bless.
Diagnosed in October, 08. One sample of needle biopsy showed Gl 6. Did watchful waiting for 18 months. PSA went fro 4.3 to 6.1. Surgery scared the heck out of me. Went to Schifler Cancer Center in Wheeling, WVA and spoke to a radiation oncologist. Had a mapping biopsy where 60 samples are taken. 15 were GL6, 1 was GL7. Had the brachytherapy on Oct. 4, 2010

Susan R
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 1/13/2011 8:03 AM (GMT -6)   
The amount of information from you all is so wonderful, and know that I have read and reread each posting. The differing opinions are wonderful and you have sparked some good conversations between me and my husband (always a good thing) Almost all of you agree that there should be another film opinion, everyone feels research needs to be done, and that everyones situation is different. We are checking them off as we do these things. The research part....well, it will never be done (in my eyes you can NEVER learn enough) We are talking to Drs, specialists, oncologists, surgeons, Uro, patients (such as yourselves) friends and family. We are getting books sent to us from around the US, which I read obsessively and immediately. We are working on making positive changes to nutrition. Being in the Army, my husband is in pretty good shape, so we have that on our side. I think we are doing part of what everyone here has suggested, and having you all give your input, just solidifies that we are taking the right baby steps. Since you have all been through the process, the thoughts, the fears, the effects of treatment choice - who better to get ideas and info from than you all. We greatly appreciate all the advice, input and thoughts. If you think of anything else you wish you would have thought about, please dont hesitate to get in touch. The more info and the more we plan and think about the better prepared we are. No info is trivial or simplistic....thank you all, and God bless you all and your families on your journey!!!

Susan R
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 511
   Posted 1/13/2011 8:03 AM (GMT -6)   
The amount of information from you all is so wonderful, and know that I have read and reread each posting. The differing opinions are wonderful and you have sparked some good conversations between me and my husband (always a good thing) Almost all of you agree that there should be another film opinion, everyone feels research needs to be done, and that everyones situation is different. We are checking them off as we do these things. The research part....well, it will never be done (in my eyes you can NEVER learn enough) We are talking to Drs, specialists, oncologists, surgeons, Uro, patients (such as yourselves) friends and family. We are getting books sent to us from around the US, which I read obsessively and immediately. We are working on making positive changes to nutrition. Being in the Army, my husband is in pretty good shape, so we have that on our side. I think we are doing part of what everyone here has suggested, and having you all give your input, just solidifies that we are taking the right baby steps. Since you have all been through the process, the thoughts, the fears, the effects of treatment choice - who better to get ideas and info from than you all. We greatly appreciate all the advice, input and thoughts. If you think of anything else you wish you would have thought about, please dont hesitate to get in touch. The more info and the more we plan and think about the better prepared we are. No info is trivial or simplistic....thank you all, and God bless you all and your families on your journey!!!
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