Bald men more likely to have prostate cancer

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DJBearGuy
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Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 732
   Posted 2/15/2011 9:51 PM (GMT -6)   
In the news a lot today. Here are a couple links:

www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/update1004a.shtml

www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41609991/ns/health-cancer/

I get nothing from this, having plenty of hair and Gleason 7. But, there is probably some connection.

DJ
Diagnosis at 53. PSA 2007 about 2; 2008 4.3
Biopsy Sept 2008: 6 of 12 cores pos; Gleason 4+3 = 7
CT & Bone scan neg
Da Vinci at City of Hope Dec 8, 2008
Rad prostatectomy & lymph node dissection
Cath out on 7th day, in on 8th day, out again 14th day after neg cystogram
Path: pT2c; lymph nodes neg; margins involv; 41 grams,
PSA 1/08, 4/09,7/09, 10/09, 11/09,2/10 <0.01, 10/10 0.1, 2/11 0.08

lifeguyd
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 677
   Posted 2/15/2011 10:06 PM (GMT -6)   
Like everything else in the pca universe, this is all about trying to sell "my" product.  Bloggers and writers (even on this site) get bored or are under pressure to produce or ..?  So they write something...like I am doing right now.
 
Statistics can tell any story you decide you want to tell.  I have not and will not read these stories, because they are only about exploitation of the reader. 
 
I'm sure that a arguement can be made for dna, male pattern baldness, hormones or testosterone as an indicater of Pca. But shame on the writers for pushing the agenda without testing the 'evidence'.

John T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2008
Total Posts : 4229
   Posted 2/15/2011 10:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Probably some connection. When I started taking Proscar for my PC I grew a lot of hair.
JT
65 years old, rising psa for 10 years from 4 to 40; 12 biopsies and MRIS all negative. Oct 2009 DXed with G6 <5%. Color Doppler biopsy found 2.5 cm G4+3. Combidex clear. Seeds and IMRT, no side affects and psa .1 at 1.5 years.

Cajun Jeff
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 4106
   Posted 2/15/2011 10:37 PM (GMT -6)   
I dont buy it. Full head of hair here. I must be the lucky one.

Cajun Jeff
9/08 PSA 5.4 referred to Urologist
9/08 Biopsy: GS 3+4=7 1 positive core in 12 1% cancer core
10/08 Nerve-Sparing open radicalSurgery Path Report Downgrade 3+3=6 GS Stage pT2c margins clea
r3 month: PSA <0.1
19th month: PSA <0.1
2 year PSA <0.1
Only issue at this time is ED but getting better

An38
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2010
Total Posts : 1148
   Posted 2/16/2011 6:29 AM (GMT -6)   
Hubby's got a full head of hair and gleason 7 cancer. His brother is very bald and a steady and low psa and no signs of cancer. And this in a family where one side of the family tree has heridetary PC.

An
Husband's age: 52. Sydney Australia.
Family history: Mat. grandfather died of PC at 72. Mat. uncle died of PC at 60. He has hereditary PC.
PSA: Aug07 - 2.5|Feb08 - 1.7|Oct09 - 3.67 (free PSA 27%)|Feb10 - 4.03 (free PSA 31%) |Jun10 - 2.69. DRE normal.
Biopsy 28Apr10: negative for a diagnosis of PC however 3 focal ASAPs “atypical, suspicious but not diagnostic” for PC. Review of biopsy by experienced pathologist, 1/12 core: 10% 3+3 (left transitional), 1/12 core: ASAP (left apex)
Nerve sparing RP, 20Aug10 with Dr Stricker. Post-op path: 3+4 (ISUP 2005). Neg (margins, seminal vesicles, extraprostatic extension). Multifocal, with main involvement in the fibro-muscular zone. T2C.
Post RP PSA,
Lab 1: Sep10 – 0.02|Nov10 – 0.03|Dec10 – 0.03
Lab 2: Nov 10 - 0.01|Dec10 – 0.01

Cajun Jeff
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2009
Total Posts : 4106
   Posted 2/16/2011 7:06 AM (GMT -6)   
Sounds like somone got some of the fed. funding for a study!

Cajun Jeff
9/08 PSA 5.4 referred to Urologist
9/08 Biopsy: GS 3+4=7 1 positive core in 12 1% cancer core
10/08 Nerve-Sparing open radicalSurgery Path Report Downgrade 3+3=6 GS Stage pT2c margins clea
r3 month: PSA <0.1
19th month: PSA <0.1
2 year PSA <0.1
Only issue at this time is ED but getting better

natural44
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 172
   Posted 2/16/2011 8:04 AM (GMT -6)   
This just in!!!!!! men who drive RED cars are more likely to have prostate cancer.......LOL I used to be statition...you can make a corelation to anything you want......
age 44 when diagnosed 45 now
RRP 9-28-10
gleason 3+3
pathology report clear
11-1-10 PSA 0.02
3 month 0.00
bladder control good
Osbon pump works but uncomfortable to use ring
some noctural erections, but not very strong,more like hanging looser and/or lower
tried all oral meds and nothing yet
Dr. R. Saint in Tulsa did my procedure, I do NOT recomend him!!

natural44
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 172
   Posted 2/16/2011 8:25 AM (GMT -6)   
Newest research shows men who are bald and drive BLUE pick up trucks are more likely to have prostate cancer than men who are not bald and ride the bus to work....LOL
age 44 when diagnosed 45 now
RRP 9-28-10
gleason 3+3
pathology report clear
11-1-10 PSA 0.02
3 month 0.00
bladder control good
Osbon pump works but uncomfortable to use ring
some noctural erections, but not very strong,more like hanging looser and/or lower
tried all oral meds and nothing yet
Dr. R. Saint in Tulsa did my procedure, I do NOT recomend him!!

DJBearGuy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2008
Total Posts : 732
   Posted 2/16/2011 9:01 AM (GMT -6)   
One thing for sure, men who have prostate cancer are more likely to have prostate cancer.

Women, though, that's another story.

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 2/16/2011 10:55 AM (GMT -6)   
I have prostate cancer - a full head of hair and I drive a WHITE pickup truck.. Where does this leave me idea

Ziggy9
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 981
   Posted 2/16/2011 11:01 AM (GMT -6)   
John T said...
Probably some connection. When I started taking Proscar for my PC I grew a lot of hair.
JT


That's why it's also prescribed for male pattern baldness. It knocks down the DHT that causes it. It also will cause less body hair grown for many men. I have a full head of hair so although there may be a slight connection with baldness and PCa for some men it doesn't apply to me.

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 2/16/2011 11:08 AM (GMT -6)   
Where do I stand: half bald, drive a white car, have a winky that does work on its on, but enjoys pogo sticks and black jelly beans?
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

jacketch
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 179
   Posted 2/16/2011 11:13 AM (GMT -6)   
Ohhh that my hair had grown back when my prostate was removed. If prostate cancer causes baldness, that should logically follow.
63 yo
V10.46 Dx Feb-09

RRP 5-5-09

No adverse SE

PSA still zero.


Thriving, not just surviving!

natural44
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 172
   Posted 2/16/2011 11:28 AM (GMT -6)   
Purgatory: I am sooooo sorry to be the barrer of bad news. Based on your information; Your car will develop rust spots and need to be cut out. and your winky will soon go bald if it isnt already.....LOL
age 44 when diagnosed 45 now
RRP 9-28-10
gleason 3+3
pathology report clear
11-1-10 PSA 0.02
3 month 0.00
bladder control good
Osbon pump works but uncomfortable to use ring
some noctural erections, but not very strong,more like hanging looser and/or lower
tried all oral meds and nothing yet
Dr. R. Saint in Tulsa did my procedure, I do NOT recomend him!!

livinadream
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 1382
   Posted 2/16/2011 5:51 PM (GMT -6)   
well my head is as slick as a cue ball and I am a gleason 9 haha guess everyone better grow some hair


Dale
I was 45 at diagnosis with PSA of 16.3
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/dalechildress

My gleason score from prostate was 4+5=9 and from the lymph nodes (3 positive) was 4+4=8
I had 44 IMRT's. Scheduled to have a radical on July 11th, 2007, surgery was aborted when it was discovered it had spread to the lymph nodes.
I was on Lupron, Casodex, and Avodart for two years with my last shot March 2009.
My Oncology hospital is The Cancer Treatment Center of America in Zion IL
PSA July of 2007 was 16.4
PSA May of 2008 was.11
PSA July 24th, 2008 is 0.04
PSA Dec 16th, 2008 is .016
PSA Mar 30th, 2009 is .02
PSA July 28th 2009 is .01
PSA OCt 15th 2009 is .11
PSA Jan 15th 2010 is .13
PSA April 16th of 2010 is .16
PSA July 22nd of 2010 is .71
PSA Sept of 2010 is .71
cancer in 4 of 6 cores
92%
80%
37%
28%

tedgard
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2008
Total Posts : 104
   Posted 2/16/2011 6:05 PM (GMT -6)   
I think the goverment should fund a study to see how many men that get PC have ten fingers and ten toes. I wonder what the findings would be....
Diagnosis Results – Oct 31, 2007;
•Age – 53 (turned 54 in Nov 2007)
•PSA is 3.83
•Gleason's Grade - 3+3=6, T1C

Surgery Dec 11, 2007;
•Cancer confirmed on Right mid and Left apex
•Both nerve bundles spared, some damage to the Left bundle.
•30 day PSA, .01
•90 day PSA, .00
•Latest PSA, .12
•ED treatments: Levitra, Cialis, Trimix, Erect Aid pump, Penile Implant on 3/12/2009
•Happy

creed_three
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2007
Total Posts : 762
   Posted 2/16/2011 6:10 PM (GMT -6)   
This one made page 17 of the Australian newspaper today too. My husband however has a full head of thick hair and was diagnosed 4 years ago. His brother (4 years older) remains free of prostate cancer (as far as we know - he does not undergo regular testing - his choice),  but has been bald since his early 30's. My CJ also drives a dark purple holden ute - I guess that and his hair mean we can keep our fingers and toes crossed for the annual PSA which was drawn today with some hope? :-) ?

NEIrish
Regular Member


Date Joined Aug 2010
Total Posts : 245
   Posted 2/16/2011 6:28 PM (GMT -6)   
A few more studies reported in the news, thanks to the conference in Orlando, Florida.  If you want to read about another that just is so infuriatingly UNhelpful than the totally confusing baldness study,  (NEIrish has full head of hair, but with a "monk-like" thinness barely visible) here's one on a PSA study:
 
ORLANDO -- An initial PSA value <3 ng/mL predicted a low risk of prostate cancer and a remote likelihood that a man would die of the disease, results of a large screening study showed.

Fewer than 6% of men developed prostate cancer over an 11-year period following a first-time screening PSA value lower than 3 ng/mL. Subsequently, 23 men died of the disease, resulting in a mortality of 0.15%, Dutch investigators reported in a study that will be presented here at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium later this week.

The median time to diagnosis of prostate cancer in men with the lowest initial PSA values exceeded eight years, said Monique Roobol, MD, of Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam.

The low cancer risk and prolonged interval to diagnosis have potentially major implications for use of PSA to screen for prostate cancer.

"These results provide justification for a PSA threshold of ≥3 ng/mL for prostate biopsy," Roobol said during a press briefing.

"The results can also contribute to individual risk stratification and management of men in PSA-based screening programs," she said. "For example, the favorable outcomes in men with initial PSA values of less than 1 ng/mL -- who accounted for 45% of men between the ages of 55 and 74 -- supports prolongation of the screening interval up to, for example, eight years."

Las Vegas urologic oncologist Nicholas Vogelzang, MD, agreed that the Dutch study drives another nail into the coffin of annual PSA screening for low-risk men.

"I believe that this study gives us some confidence that annual PSA screening is going to soon become a thing of the past," said Vogelzang, of Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, who moderated the briefing.

"A low PSA, particularly men with a PSA less than 1, and probably those with a PSA less than 2, could be considered for substantially longer intervals of PSA screening. We formerly learned that a PSA of four was the threshold for a prostate biopsy. This study suggests the number should drop to 3."

Use of PSA to screen for prostate cancer has a controversial history. Since the test became widely available in the 1990s, disease stage at diagnosis has migrated to the lowest, most curable stages.

Supporters of screening with PSA point to the near-100% five-year survival except for the cancers associated with distant metastasis as evidence that screening with PSA works.

PSA's detractors argue that the test merely uncovers clinically insignificant cancers that would not have posed a mortality threat if they had never been discovered. Diagnosis of prostate cancer at early stages has led to significant overtreatment, morbidity and cost, they argue.

A key issue in the controversy relates to the most appropriate PSA value for identifying men with an increased risk of prostate cancer. The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate (ERSPC) used a PSA value of 3.0 ng/mL as the cutoff for a prostate biopsy.

Roobol reported findings from an analysis of a Dutch cohort included in ERSPC. The cohort comprised 42,376 men ages 55 to 74 and living in the Rotterdam area. The researchers randomized 19,950 of the participants to serial screening PSA tests, and men who had initial PSA values ≥3 ng/mL underwent prostate biopsy.

Roobol and her co-investigators focused on the 15,758 (79%) men who had PSA values <3.0 ng/mL at their first screening test. Follow-up screening occurred at four-year intervals.

From 1993 through 2008, 915 (5.8%) of the 15,758 men had prostate cancer diagnoses and 23 (0.15%) died during a median follow-up of 11 years.

The investigators determined 182 of the cancers were detected between screenings, and 169 (1.1%) had characteristics associated with more aggressive cancer (clinical stage >T2c, Gleason score >8, PSA at diagnosis >20 ng/mL, and spread to lymph nodes or distant sites).

Within the range of PSA values from undetectable to 3 ng/mL, prostate cancer incidence and mortality increased.

Of the 7,126 men with PSA values <1 ng/mL, 129 (1.8%) eventually had prostate cancer diagnoses, and three (0.04%) of the men died of prostate cancer.

Of the 6,156 men with PSA values of 1.0 to 1.9 ng/mL, 415 developed (6.7%) prostate cancer, and 11 (0.18%) died of the cancer.

The remaining 2,476 men had PSA values of 2.0 to 2.9 ng/mL; 371 (15.7%) of them developed prostate cancer and nine (0.36%) died of the disease.

As compared with men who had initial PSA values <1.0 ng/mL, men with first-time values of 1.0 to 1.9 ng/mL had a significantly higher incidence (HR 4.0, P<0.001), proportion of aggressive cancers (HR 2.7, P<0.001), and prostate cancer mortality (HR 3.9, P=0.038).

Corresponding hazards for men in the PSA range of 2.0 to 2.9 ng/mL were HR 10.3 for incidence (P<0.001), HR 6.9 for aggressive cancers (P<0.001) and HR 7.5 for prostate cancer mortality (P=0.003).


Jerry L.
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 3057
   Posted 2/16/2011 7:08 PM (GMT -6)   
Full head of hair here...whatever...
Nov. 2009 Dx at Age 44
Dec. 2009 DaVinci Robotic Surgery
Jan. 2010 T3b, Gleason 9
Feb. 2010 Adjuvant Radiation

PSA History:
-----------------
Nov. 2009 4.30
Feb. 2010 <.05
May 2010 <.05
Aug. 2010 <.05
Nov. 2010 <.05
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