Largest Study to Date Shows Little Need for PSA Beyond 10 Years Postop

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ChrisR
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   Posted 2/23/2011 6:17 AM (GMT -6)   

LV-TX
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Date Joined Jul 2008
Total Posts : 966
   Posted 2/23/2011 7:45 AM (GMT -6)   
Chris...you have to be a member to preview the article.

Can you give us a summary of the article for those that don't want to subscribe.

Thanks,
You are beating back cancer, so hold your head up with dignity

Les

Robotic Surgery Sept 2008
PSA increasing since January 2009
Current PSA .44 (29 months)
PSA Doubling time approx. 6 months
Clinical Trial - SRT begins 3/01/11

MikeS24
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 131
   Posted 2/23/2011 7:46 AM (GMT -6)   
Chris: Notice that Dr. Loeb said "probably" to the need for post 10 year PSA tests. :-)

So all we need to do is get past this next 10 years. Thanks for the article. That is very encouraging news.

Mike S.
Dx 56
Biopsy: Gleason 3+3=6, PSA 6.6 One core of 12 with 5% T1c
Surgery: July 2010 J. Hopkins
Pathology Gleason 6, Neg Mar, Neg LN, Neg Sem Vesicles
9/15/10 1st post op PSA >0.1 undetectable
3/11/11 PSA - TBD
Incontinence - very slow recovery
Aug -Sept 2010 - 4-5 pads
Oct 2010 3 pads
Nov 2010 2 pads
Dec - Feb 2011 1 pad all day - 1 pad at night
ED: slow improvements

ChrisR
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 825
   Posted 2/23/2011 9:08 AM (GMT -6)   

Here it is.

 

February 21, 2011 (Orlando, Florida) — Is it reasonable to discontinue prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing 10 years after radical prostatectomy if the patient has remained disease-free to that point?

Stacy Loeb, MD, a urology resident at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, Maryland, presented the findings here at the 2011 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium.

"A lot of issues are addressed by prostate cancer guidelines," Dr. Loeb told Medscape Medical News in an interview. "But one issue not addressed is how long patients need to continue PSA testing after radical prostatectomy."

 
Dr. Stacy Loeb

Results from the largest study carried out to date — and with the longest follow-up — suggest that the answer is yes.

Previous studies have shown that biochemical recurrence usually occurs within 5 years of surgery; even when cancers return after 5 years, they're usually associated with less risk for morbidity and mortality.

This retrospective study followed 10,609 men from the Hopkins database, some for as long as 25 years after surgery. Dr. Loeb reported that 1,684 men in the cohort had biochemical recurrences, defined as a PSA level above 0.2 ng/mL, without previous hormonal or radiation therapy.

Dr. Loeb said that 77% of the recurrences occurred within 5 years of surgery, 16.6% occurred 5 to 10 years after surgery, 4.9% occurred 10 to 15 years after surgery, and 1.5% occurred more than 15 years after surgery.

"Late recurrences were associated with more favorable pathologic features," Dr. Loeb said. "Even when cancers did recur, they were unlikely to metastasize or cause the patient to die from prostate cancer."

Having a low initial Gleason score was a favorable factor, she said. "No patient with a Gleason [score of] 6 or less had metastases or death, even if they had late recurrence. So for those men, and also for men with a limited life expectancy, it's probably safe to discontinue PSA testing 10 years after surgery."

Dr. Loeb concluded that "men who remain disease-free 10 years after surgery should be counseled that their risk of subsequent cancer-related morbidity and mortality is low."

 
Dr. Jonathan Tward

Jonathan Tward, MD, a radiation oncologist at the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, said that he found the study very useful. "It's not like a lot of studies where it's unclear how to translate the findings to clinical practice. This directly guides physicians as to what they can tell patients."

He noted that prostate cancer is associated with a lot of anxiety before treatment, but also after treatment. "Every few months when PSA is drawn, it causes patients a lot of worry; it can be almost like a [posttraumatic stress disorder], quite frankly. So knowing when you can safely stop testing is really important information."

Both Dr. Tward and Dr. Loeb did stress, however that in very young patients it's probably a good idea to continue testing beyond 10 years. "If you have a very young patient, I'd be wary of stopping after 10 years, because there's still a lot of potential for bone metastases in those patients," Dr. Tward said. "Even looking at data going out 20 years, it may only be a few who will develop metastases, but you don't want them having to live with that risk."

Both physicians also agreed that rather than stopping PSA testing completely after 10 years, a reasonable option might be to continue to testing, but at much less frequent intervals. "Frankly, anything more frequent than once a year seems like overkill," Dr. Tward said.


ChrisR
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 825
   Posted 2/23/2011 9:41 AM (GMT -6)   
So, out of 10,609 they saw 1684 BCR failures....

1296.68 < 5 years
279.54 5-10 years
82.51 10-15 years
25.26 > 15 years

Overall 16% failed.
 
However, none of the G6 developed metastatic cancer or died of PCa.

Tony Crispino
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Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 8128
   Posted 2/23/2011 10:00 AM (GMT -6)   
Do not believe this gal for one minute.

We have far differing evidence here at HW with our members. Clearly this article is missing data. My guess is that this is intended for patients that had low risk/contained prostate cancer factors after RP. Clearly they are not referring to intermediate or high risk factors.

Chris the Stan Brosman 18.6 year report you posted gives a totally conflicting point of view. In fact several studies and reports I have read the monitoring for intermediate and high risk cases needs to continue "indefinitely".

Don't buy this bill of goods. This is a terrible article.

Tony
Advanced Prostate Cancer at age 44 (I am 48 now)
pT3b,N0,Mx (original PSA was 19.8) EPE, PM, SVI. Gleason 4+3=7

Treatments:
Da Vinci Surgery ~ 2/16/2007
Adjuvant Radiation Therapy ~ IMRT Completed 8/07
Adjuvant Hormone Therapy ~ 28 months on Casodex and Lupron.
Undetectable PSA.

Blog: www.caringbridge.org/visit/tonycrispino

ChrisR
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 825
   Posted 2/23/2011 10:45 AM (GMT -6)   
Tony,

You should know by now that every study we read contridicts some other study.
Dx @ 42 years old on 4/2008
Gleason 6 (50 Point Biopsy) (6 Cores positive - Small Focus Each)
open RP 10/08 Johns Hopkins Dr. Partin
pT2 Organ Confined Gleason 6 (tertiary score 0)
PSA Since Surgery
1/15/2009 (3 Month) <.1
10/15/2009 (1 Year) <.1
10/15/2010 (2 Year) <0.03
02/11/2011 (2.3 Year) <0.03 (Impromptu done by GP at a physical)
10/15/2011 (3 Year) -

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 2/23/2011 10:54 AM (GMT -6)   
Chris,

It's funny that the line in the sand in this report is ten years. That was how my original medical oncolgist felt when I had survived my 3rd time with the ultra rare, but dangerous porocaricnoma episodes that I had. He felt that 5 years was not long enough to stop worrying, that he wouldn't feel comfortable until I had reached the 10 year mark with no evidence of recurrance. In that cancer there is no blood test, it would take the equivilent of having a DRE over your body to look for new or suspicios lumps or growths below skin level. I passed the 10 year mark on that a year ago, but I still check myself about once a month as originally instructed.

My only feeling in the 10 year mark with the PC, is that if the patient is 60 or over, perhaps a good thing, and I am assuming we are dealing with low risk, G6 cases, without other high risk factors at play. I don't think I would tell one of our young brothers in their early 40s that they dont need to be tested after 10 years.

David
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

Mackattack
Regular Member


Date Joined Jan 2011
Total Posts : 78
   Posted 2/23/2011 11:38 AM (GMT -6)   
I have not yet had my first post op PSA, so I guess I can't yet relate to long term, but I'm not sure what a study would have to look like for me to ever say "No Doc, this year let's skip the PSA."
PSA 3.9 - October 2010 at annual physical
PSA 4.1 - November 2010 after a month of antibiotic, DRE Normal
Age 41 in December 2010 at Dx of 6 of 12 cores positive T1C and Gleason 3 + 3

open RP on 2/14/11 at Mass General

Post Surgery Pathology Report: Gleason 6, T2, Cancer in 35% of Prostate, All Margins Clear

ChrisR
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 825
   Posted 2/23/2011 12:00 PM (GMT -6)   
Dave,

You are correct. If you read the study they are not suggesting this to younger patients. I also don't believe it was limited to just G6 people. The overall failure rate was 16%. That is too high for OC G6 people. Even for the ones we have here, which by the way I have only found 1 that failed out of 27 people. I also agree that this is for older people who were dx. I really think all they are saying is that out of the 1684 people that had BCR only a small percent failed after 10 years and an even smaller amount after 15 years.

I am sure we could try to get the exact details of the study from J.H.

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 2/23/2011 12:42 PM (GMT -6)   
Yep, I think of myself, Sonny, and a few others here, that had BCR after surgery within a year or less, don't believe any of us were G6s, think were all G7 cases if I am not mistaken.
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

Sonny3
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Date Joined Aug 2009
Total Posts : 2447
   Posted 2/23/2011 1:46 PM (GMT -6)   
Thought I would pop in here. Don't see my name in print too often.

As regards my own case, I have long ago blown the doors off of anybody's statistics. I don't consider my cancer to have been BCR, mine just never went away in the first darn place. My first 30 day PSA was .40 and it has only gone up since then. You guys know my story; surgery, SRT, MET radiation, and still a rising PSA, currently measured at 3.90.

So I would love to be in a study that says after all of this I would still be around and kicking in 10 years. Just put me in coach I am ready to play.

Seriously though, 16% doesn't sound that good, but I have learned that when dealing with cancer nothing sounds good. But I would bet that these stats are much more impressive than that of any study that was done 20-30 years ago. The advances in treating PCA have come a long way no doubt.

Sure would like to see a few more advances and quickly too in my case.

Sonny

ChrisR
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Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 825
   Posted 2/23/2011 3:47 PM (GMT -6)   
i'm with ya Sonny.
Dx @ 42 years old on 4/2008
Gleason 6 (50 Point Biopsy) (6 Cores positive - Small Focus Each)
open RP 10/08 Johns Hopkins Dr. Partin
pT2 Organ Confined Gleason 6 (tertiary score 0)
PSA Since Surgery
1/15/2009 (3 Month) <.1
10/15/2009 (1 Year) <.1
10/15/2010 (2 Year) <0.03
02/11/2011 (2.3 Year) <0.03 (Impromptu done by GP at a physical)
10/15/2011 (3 Year) -

wigged-out
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 130
   Posted 2/23/2011 4:14 PM (GMT -6)   
I asked my surgeon about the idea that after 10 years, you are free and clear of cancer. He said that as far as he is concerned, that he would continue to monitor psa for the rest of my life, which I am hoping is way beyond ten years.

I suppose better safe than sorry.

W-O
Age: 55- good health. Exercise regularly.
DRE 11/08- no lumps, just enlarged prostate
PSA checked regularly, last 6.6/
Needle Biopsy 11/09- 12 samples. 11 OK. Right Lateral Mid- Adenocarcinoma Gleason score 3+3=6 9 involving 5% of specimen.
PSA risingto 8.0 thru 2010.
2nd biopsy- 2 positive cores, one a 3+3=6, 3% and the other a 3+4=7, 20%
Very last PSA- 12
DaVinci scheduled 2/14/2011

BMelO
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 2/25/2011 5:29 PM (GMT -6)   
I don't believe this study applies to me. I don't think I'll ever feel cured and will be following my PSA for many years to come. I am grateful to be approaching 8 yrs out with a Gleason 9 T3c tumor. Anybody out there with a similar story?
Diagnosed age 49-6/2003 - PSA 9.5 - Gleason 7 - +seminal vesicle, despite advice opted for RP 7/2003 - confirmed T3cN0M0, Gleason upgraded to 9. Post RP PSA undectable. Got docetaxal chemo as part of a study at Hopkins for 6 months thru 2/2004. No ADT rx yet. PSA has remained undectable thru 12/2010. Continent. Use BiMix with good results.

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25380
   Posted 2/25/2011 6:52 PM (GMT -6)   
Welcome aboard, BMelO. You are doing very well to be 8 years out with a Gleason 9, and still undetectable PSA as of December. Sure some of the other advanced guys here will be interested in your story and journey so far.

Please stick with us and keep us posted.

David in SC
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 11/10 Not taking it
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/23/10

English Alf
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Date Joined Oct 2009
Total Posts : 2215
   Posted 2/26/2011 2:09 AM (GMT -6)   
I haven't got it written down anywhere, but I was under the impression that they had told me I was going to be tested for the rest of my life, the goal is simply to get me from 3 months to 6 months and then annual tests. I guess the fatcros here is my age, my gleason 7 and stage T3b.
My sister however reports that my brother-in-law (aged 75) has "been taken off the list" which suggests he has stopped beng tested.

I don;t get the idea that you can somehow stop a guy getting anxious about his PCa status by stopping testing him. Of course PSA anxiety exists, but at least the test gives you an answer, no test mans no answer, but still leaves the question.

My dermatologist still gives me 6 monthly check-ups for skin cancer and that's without even having had skin cancer!

Alf

BMelO
New Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 2/26/2011 6:53 AM (GMT -6)   
I am always on the lookout for this type of study. I am looking for some indication that as time goes that I am somehow better off rather than simply running out of time. This study which shows a better outcome for those with later recurrence does some of that. The studies on pomegranate extract which demonstrate increased doubling times the longer the participants were taking the extract also is encouraging. These studies are not definitive, not perfect, but for one with a poor prognosis at diagnosis they provide some much needed hope for the future.

Brian
Diagnosed age 49-6/2003 - PSA 9.5 - Gleason 7 - +seminal vesicle, despite advice opted for RP 7/2003 - confirmed T3cN0M0, Gleason upgraded to 9. Post RP PSA undectable. Got docetaxal chemo as part of a study at Hopkins for 6 months thru 2/2004. No ADT rx yet. PSA has remained undectable thru 12/2010. Continent. Use BiMix with good results.

MikeS24
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 131
   Posted 2/26/2011 9:04 AM (GMT -6)   
To All:  The Hopkins study appears to have looked at some previously collected data on Gleason 6 men and extracted more data from them as the study continued.  I think the comment is correct when said about older men.  At some point doing a PSA test when all of the previous tests have been undetectable is worthless to continue to do.  Dr. Loeb's point is that when the right age (perhaps in the late 70s or 80s comes) the probability that the PSA will spike upward and the chance of having an agressive tumor is extremely small.  Even if PSA starts to become detectable at say 75 or 80 after a 10 - 15 year absence, as we know the chance of succumbing to PCa is very small.  PSA at that point would probably only indicate a very indolent cancer growth.  As read in various treatment protocols, men at that high an age would not be treated aggressively anyway if it were a virgin occurance of PCa or a reoccurance of an old first occurance.
 
This discussion goes to the heart of the debate.  GS 6, organ confined, no seminal vesicles involvement and neg lymph nodes, negative margins have a very small reoccurance rate.  I think that has been pretty nailed down for now.  The science of prostate prognostication starts to get a bit hazy when dealing with Gleason 7 patients still with organ confined disease.  Even more cloudy are predictive values for GS 7 with positive margins.  Total fog when it comes to higher Gleason stages and more invasion.  Some of these men never have much progression or if so it comes over a very long period of time.  Others silp away at light speed for apparent reason even when counterparts match all other pathology results.
 
So the take home lesson is that predictive knowledge of PCa is unpredictable to a degree.  I think we have too many variables to juggle.  How the body responds naturally is one big unknown.  Add to that how the body responds to treatments is not consistent.  So we are left with a lot of black box theories and a few well planned studies that try to answer these questions.  Surely some researcher wants to be the first to claim that treatment A, combined with treatment B for a patient with X characteristics on his pathology will provide a brilliant outcome that either hits the jackpot and cures PCa or knocks it down to a managable, maintenance level with ongoing therapy that preserves a high quality of life. 
 
Personally, I know I signed up to become a "lab rat" for the ongoing work they are doing at Johns Hopkins.  Just before my biopsy, a young doctor brought me into an exam room and went over the study they were conducting for long term research on PCa.  My data would be confidential, known only by a code number.  They drew blood and I signed lots of forms.  Hopefully, the samples I provided along with the samples many others gave will help move the research forward.  I am thankful places like Hopkins and other university based hospitals have the staff and research grants to do this work.  Without it, we could be back in the pre-PSA era with the DRE as the "gold standard" for diagnosing PCa.  In that case we would be right back to the extremely high death rates we saw before PSA was introduced.  Those guys with positive DREs had big tumors, lots of GS 8 -10 and little hope of any curative treatment.   Sorry, don't want to go back to those "good old days."
 
So keep on researching all you nameless, unsung heroes of the prostate battle.  We and our sons are counting on you.
 
Mike S.
Dx 56
Biopsy: Gleason 3+3=6, PSA 6.6 One core of 12 with 5% T1c
Surgery: July 2010 J. Hopkins
Pathology Gleason 6, Neg Mar, Neg LN, Neg Sem Vesicles
9/15/10 1st post op PSA >0.1 undetectable
3/11/11 PSA - TBD
Incontinence - very slow recovery
Aug -Sept 2010 - 4-5 pads
Oct 2010 3 pads
Nov 2010 2 pads
Dec - Feb 2011 1 pad all day - 1 pad at night
ED: slow improvements

wigged-out
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2009
Total Posts : 130
   Posted 2/26/2011 9:13 AM (GMT -6)   
Mike.

I too was asked to participate in a study. I guess my organ goes out on tour but is always available for my dr./surgeon to review whenever. They also took additional blood just before they wheeled me in for my tune up.

I thought that it didn't matter much and if it could possibly help end this plague, I'm ok with it.

W-O
Age: 55- good health. Exercise regularly.
DRE 11/08- no lumps, just enlarged prostate
PSA checked regularly, last 6.6/
Needle Biopsy 11/09- 12 samples. 11 OK. Right Lateral Mid- Adenocarcinoma Gleason score 3+3=6 9 involving 5% of specimen.
PSA risingto 8.0 thru 2010.
2nd biopsy- 2 positive cores, one a 3+3=6, 3% and the other a 3+4=7, 20%
Very last PSA- 12
DaVinci scheduled 2/14/2011

Sancarlos
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2010
Total Posts : 242
   Posted 2/26/2011 10:58 AM (GMT -6)   
BMelO said...
I don't believe this study applies to me. I don't think I'll ever feel cured and will be following my PSA for many years to come. I am grateful to be approaching 8 yrs out with a Gleason 9 T3c tumor. Anybody out there with a similar story?


I feel the same way, i.e. I doubt I will ever feel that I am cured and will be following my PSA to the day I die.

But you are sure doing great 8 years out with G9 PCa and must be doing something right so keep it up.

Sancarlos
Age 66, PC diagnosed 7/2009 at age 65
Stage: T2c, Gleason: 9 (4 + 5), 6 of 6 cores positive
Bone, CAT and MIR scans negative

Treatment: brachytherapy (103 palladium), 100 gy, 11/2009 + ADT3 (Lupron + Casodex+Avodart) + IMRT on Novalis, 45 gy, 3/2010.

PSA: 7/2009, At time of diagnosis -- 11.9
10/2009 -- 5.0
12/2009 -- 0.56
5/2010 -- 0.15
8/9/2010 -- 0.06
11/2010 -- 0.013
3/25/2011-- 0.005

MikeS24
Regular Member


Date Joined Oct 2010
Total Posts : 131
   Posted 2/26/2011 11:50 AM (GMT -6)   
Sancarlos:  I agree with your assessment.  However, isn't it nice to know that this disease does not have a strict, straight line method of progression?  It can be fought and kept at bay for a considerable time.  How terrible it would be if every single case had the same and exact prognosis and time frame.   If you read the studies on advanced disease in the pre-PSA era, even with nasty Gleason, PSA and tumor grades, I believe the survival rate was somewhere in the 30 percent range.  Despite the diagnosis, some did well and further, that was without the treatment protocols we have today.  The knowledge base keeps getting better.  I pray that you and others are ones who beat every one of the odds.
 
Eventually, they will crack the code on personalized, genetic-based drug therapies to fight this and other cancers.  It appears to be the future of pharmacological research.  Isolate the culprits and introduce a change to the replication patter of cells to self-destruct if they are cancer cells.  Leave the good cells intact.  Our kids may have this as a tool for fighting disease.  We might just get a glimpse of it in a decade or so.
Best to you.
Mike S.
Dx 56
Biopsy: Gleason 3+3=6, PSA 6.6 One core of 12 with 5% T1c
Surgery: July 2010 J. Hopkins
Pathology Gleason 6, Neg Mar, Neg LN, Neg Sem Vesicles
9/15/10 1st post op PSA >0.1 undetectable
3/11/11 PSA - TBD
Incontinence - very slow recovery
Aug -Sept 2010 - 4-5 pads
Oct 2010 3 pads
Nov 2010 2 pads
Dec - Feb 2011 1 pad all day - 1 pad at night
ED: slow improvements

davidg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 2/27/2011 10:00 AM (GMT -6)   
I was gleason 7 ( 3+4) and it was contained, removed and now my PSA 0. I guess I'm one of those "low risk" cases, whatever that really means.

I enjoyed reading the article, but frankly will continue testing long after 10 years. What's the harm in a blood test? I'll also have my son start testing in his early 30s.

gold horse
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2009
Total Posts : 360
   Posted 2/28/2011 8:33 AM (GMT -6)   
After almost six years of psa=0.04,I will always go for my psa once per year.
I feel is it better for me to be stress out once at year than no kwoing what is going on inside of me.
DIAGN=46 YEARS
GLEASON=3+3
FATHER HAD PC,THEN I THEN MY BROTHER STILL HAS TWO BROTHER PC FREE.
MARRIED,TWO CHILDREN.AGE 13 AND 8.
LAPROSCOPY SURGERY 6/2005
PATOLOGY REPORT.
GLEASON=3+3
TUMOR VOLUME=5%
LYMPHOVASCULAR INVASION=NEG
PERINEURAL INVASION=POSI
TUMOR MULTICENTRICITY=NEG
EXTRAPROSTATIC INVASION=NEG
SEMINAL VESICLES BOTH=CLEAN
MARGIN ALL=NEG
PT2ANXMX
DEVELOP SCART TISSUE AND NEEDED A SECOND SURGERY BECAUSE COULD NOT URINATE,
PSA 6/05=0.04,0.04,0.04,6/06,0.04,0.04,0.04,6/07,0.04,0.04,0.04,6/08,0.04,0.04,1/09
0.04,10/09,0.04
 

ChrisR
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2008
Total Posts : 825
   Posted 2/28/2011 1:35 PM (GMT -6)   
Goldhorse ... They say you could actually go to testing once every 2 years now.
Dx @ 42 years old on 4/2008
Gleason 6 (50 Point Biopsy) (6 Cores positive - Small Focus Each)
open RP 10/08 Johns Hopkins Dr. Partin
pT2 Organ Confined Gleason 6 (tertiary score 0)
PSA Since Surgery
1/15/2009 (3 Month) <.1
10/15/2009 (1 Year) <.1
10/15/2010 (2 Year) <0.03
02/11/2011 (2.3 Year) <0.03 (Impromptu done by GP at a physical)
10/15/2011 (3 Year) -
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