our comfort zone

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davidg
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Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 3/24/2011 7:32 PM (GMT -6)   
I am almost 3 months out of surgery and have had 1 post op PSA test so far. Although not obsessed by it, I understand that i'll be testing it the rest of my life and perhaps will need radiation and/or other treatments in the future.

I'm pretty much set with regards to my care givers in that i really trust my surgeon, his opinion and his staff. I couldn't imagine using someone else at thsi point.

So 2 weeks ago I learned I have the option of picking up and moving my family to Rome Italy for 1-2 years for work. There are some intimidating things about the move, but none as big as my concern for my health and for my month to month care. I am comfortable with my doc and with the level of excellence in this country with regards to technology and expertise. If I have to be sick, I'd rather be sick in America quite frankly because I do have health insurance and can use the system to my advantage.

I emailed my surgeon on a Sunday afternoon with this question and he told me to not worry as I could fly him over any time I wanted :), then he said "no seriously, go, just make sure to send me the PSA results"

So I haven't made up my mind yet, but this is one of the biggest hurdles I'm facing. It's a major change and after these extremely unsettling 5 months (cancer, surgery, recovery), it might be wise to just stay put for a while.

On the other hand, although everyone tells me to not think this way, I feel like I just got an "out of jail" card and that this is my window, perhaps last chance to do something like this because I could be going through radiation or other treatments within a few years.

Everyone says 'do it man!" but they haven't been where we have. What do you think?

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25364
   Posted 3/24/2011 7:41 PM (GMT -6)   
Why dont you post your age and stats again, kind of hard to think about an answer without being able to remember where you stand right now.
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 2/11 1.24
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10,

Herophilus
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Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 657
   Posted 3/24/2011 7:41 PM (GMT -6)   

Very interesting...No way I can tell you what to do, however I completely understand your trepidations about such a move. You seem to have things together, so I’m sure you’ll get to where you need to be.

Best of luck

Hero


davidg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 3/24/2011 7:48 PM (GMT -6)   
Purgatory said...
Why dont you post your age and stats again, kind of hard to think about an answer without being able to remember where you stand right now.


I'm in good shape but I tend to worry and expect the worse so i can rejoice when things go well.

Prostate was small, 34 grams.
Final Gleason score 7 (3+4)
Less than 5% of slides involved tumor
Tumor measured 5 mm in greatest dimension and was located in the right lobe near the apex.
Tumor was confined to prostate.
The apical, basal, pseudocapsular and soft tissue resection margins were free of tumor.
Seminal vesicles were free of tumor.
Right pelvic node - benign fibroadiopse tissue. no lymph node is identified.
Left pelvic node - one small lymph node, negative for tumor (0/1)

AJCC stage: pT2 NO MX

goodlife
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2009
Total Posts : 2691
   Posted 3/24/2011 8:28 PM (GMT -6)   
David,

What would you do if you weren't recovering from PC ?

I have determined in my own life that I am going to act and live the same way I did before PC after PC. Obviously, I need to have doctor checks, etc, maybe even SRT or HT, but as much as is practical, I am charging on ahead. I had surgery on Monday , back home on Thursday, at church on Sunday, leg bag and all. No one except for a few close friends ever knew.

It would be my opinion, that if you have an opportunity of a lifetime to live in Rome, and you and your family would like to do it, don't let PC rob you of the chance. Very worst case, if you did have a BCR, the Itailans have an excellent medical system.

Just my opinion. Sounds like a really neat opportunity.

Goodlife
Goodlife
 
Age 58, PSA 4.47 Biopsy - 2/12 cores , Gleason 4 + 5 = 9
Da Vinci, Cleveland Clinic  4/14/09   Nerves spared, but carved up a little.
0/23 lymph nodes involved  pT3a NO MX
Catheter and 2 stints in ureters for 2 weeks .
Neg Margins, bladder neck negative
Living the Good Life, cancer free  6 week PSA  <.03
3 month PSA <.01 (different lab)
5 month PSA <.03 (undetectable)
6 Month PSA <.01
1 pad a day, no progress on ED.  Trimix injection
No pads, 1/1/10,  9 month PSA < .01
1 year psa (364 days) .01
15 month PSA <.01

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25364
   Posted 3/24/2011 8:29 PM (GMT -6)   
David,

Just from your stats alone, the 5% involvement was a good thing, the Gleason could be problematic at some point, but until you see a trent in future psa readings, no reason to think you wont do well.

While Italy is not the US, its not like a third world country, probably some very good medical facilities and doctors, especially in Rome. I would think your insurance, if through your employer, would be good, or perhaps offered something suitable for use while you are in Rome.

Also, if something went wrong in the future, i.e. BCR, and you needed SRT, its not going to happen overnight, so you could plan to come back to the US for any future treatments if needed, if you weren't comfortable with the medical situation there.

If this opportunity is truly a great one for you and your family, it might well indeed be worth some minimal risk to take advantage of it.

I am at an age, and with all my family here, and a high comfort factor with my current medical team, along with the fact that I had rapid BCR, and now a failed SRT, if it were me, I wouldn't be comfortable leaving my current surroundings. But thats just me, and besides, no one is offering me the chance to live in Europe for a few years.

It will be a tough decsion that only you can make.

David in SC
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 2/11 1.24
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10,

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3631
   Posted 3/24/2011 8:46 PM (GMT -6)   
“Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

— Mark Twain

No matter what you decide, it will all work out...Rome is a beautiful city..The traffic is , well, bad....Just do it!

tatt2man
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 2840
   Posted 3/24/2011 8:52 PM (GMT -6)   
David:
- this is a great site for support and on occasion, validation of an internal decision.
DAVID:
- that is why men ( and women) tend to cluster in similar groups...

- if I had your stats and situation, I would go for it...

but what matters most...
- if you had your stats and situation, what would you do?

sincere hugs,
BRONSON

p.s. remember, you are only 12 weeks out of surgery - your body and mind (and spirit) is still recovering ...

p.p.s. you have already answered your question in your original post...

p.p.p.s. hugs again
..........................
Age:55 -gay with spouse of 14 years, Steve -Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
PSA:10/06/09 3.86
Biopsy:10/16/09- 6 of 12 cancerous samples, Gleason 7 (4+3)
Radical Prostatectomy:11/18/09
Pathology:pT3a -Gleason 7 -extraprostatic extension -perineural invasion -prostate weight -34.1 gm
PSA:04/08/10 -0.05 -Zero Club
PSA:09/23/10 -0.05 -Zero Club
PSA:03/24/11 -0.02 -Zero Club
PSA:03/24/12- TBA

142
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 6894
   Posted 3/24/2011 9:39 PM (GMT -6)   
David,
 
I lived in that area for a few years, and I have nothing bad to say about the health care I received. Get your blood work done - you'll get a printed report that will astound an American doctor. And they do have airplanes that go back and forth every day should you need them.
 
I'm still dripping, and I would already be gone.
 
You're still here ....?????

davidg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 3/24/2011 10:00 PM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the responses.

I should have added that I was born there and lived there until I was 18 ( with a five year break in London ). I came here for college. Italian mother, American dad.

I know the health care system there is good, but in all honesty, if my PSA spiked up we would be on the first plane back and I'd be in my surgeon's office asking him where to do radiation ( Sturm probably since they are colleagues ). It's just how I feel.

As for my health coverage, I already asked them. I may not get sick in a year or two but kids always get sick and I have two of them. My insurance cannot pay Italian doctors because they don't have a pin number, so I'd have to pay cash up front and then submit a claim. So it's doable, but definitely a headache.

What would I do if I didn't have cancer? well it was never my intention to come here and stay here. It's been 22 years now. I always had a dream of going back but with each year my kids become more and more dependent on their friends, school and community. Outside of my concerns about my health there is also the concern of uprooting them. Although I know it's a great experience.

bronson - I know i'm still recovering, mentally and physically. That is another reason for concern when making such a big decision. Not sure how rational I can be. When i walked into my bosses office to tell/ask him I started out with " I've had a tough year and I need to...". He was great about it.

142 - what did you do there?

Goodlife - I think part, or most of this decision is fueled by the fact that my last 5 months have been so emotional/illogical and life shaking.

Fairwind - as concerned as we are, that is what my wife and I always tell each other... when are we ever going to get an opportunity like this again? and how much will we regret it if we don't do it?

David - I am the right age for this. Also, my oldest will be in college in 4 years and it'll be too late by then because I wouldn't leave him here alone and move to Europe.

We'll see. Right now, although a final decision hasn't been made, I have already gotten real estate agents on both ends, applied to american school for the kids and started the process of getting my wife legal papers to stay beyond a tourist visa.

Haven't even told my mother yet. She wants to move here since my cancer and I'm thinking of calling her up in ROme and ambushing her with the news then and there.

I'll keep you all posted, even if I chicken out.

Sparrowhawk
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 130
   Posted 3/25/2011 4:54 AM (GMT -6)   
David, grab the golden ring when your turn comes around! Head off to Rome! Keep your Dr. in the States informed as to what's going on with your health. If you're worried about treatment overseas you could always return to the USA. Think good things and they will happen.
Best of luck, chow!

Julietinthewoods
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 309
   Posted 3/25/2011 6:45 AM (GMT -6)   
David, sometimes when I have a big, confusing choice to make, I draw up a paper with the pros listed on one side and the cons on the other. I list everything I can think of. Sometimes seeing it on paper helps me to clarify my position. It can also help to sort the fear-based reactions (usually the most unlikely scenarios) from the logical and rational ones.

Also, even though it is ultimately your health and your decision to make, spouses really do often have good input.

Good luck with your decision!

Juliet

logoslidat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 5653
   Posted 3/25/2011 2:16 PM (GMT -6)   
Davidg, aren't you glad your first name isn't Kenny, lol. Anyhew, I would not pass that opportunity up period. Hey this is the 21st century, with all the technology etc..... PCA isn't like most other cancers, even at its worst its slower than most. If fears are realized, you scoot back here for treatment, money may be an issue, don't know. This may be hard to do, but, try not to worry, expect the 0, and then rejoice cause your hope has been realized. Actually a move like that does require a lot of thought, even in perfect health. I hear you on the emotions, but we all know not to make decisions on that. I'll put it another, and don't let this freak you. If you were told today that you definetly had 5 years to live period. What would you do ? Think bucket list. Well the stats for PCA is 99%+ survival beginning at diagnosis. And you will live much longer than that. To me if your fears are realized the only issue is the hassel involved. Life is filled with those in the best scenario. Either way your decision will be the right one, cause you will never really know till the great pass if it isn't. Hey all roads lead to Rome right. ps Can we swap homes for vacations, Maui for Rome, lidat
Diagnosed 8/14/09 psa 8.1 66,now 67
2cores 70%, rest 6-7 < 5%
gleason 3+ 3, up to 3+4 @ the dub
RPP U of Wash, Bruce Dalkin,
pathology 4+3, tertiary5, 2 foci
extensive pni, prostate confined,27 nodes removed -, svi - margins -
99%continent@ cath removal. 1% incont@gaspass,sneeze,cough 18 mos, squirt @ running. psa std test reported on paper as 0.0 as of 12/14/10 ed improving

Kark60
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 91
   Posted 3/25/2011 4:52 PM (GMT -6)   
I had a somewhat similar decision to make recently when I was offered a new job; essentially a career advancement opportunity with a different university (I am an academic administrator). They offered me the job with full knowledge of my PCa and immediately following my SRT.

I certainly was nervous about my future, especially leaving my comfort zone, my current situation, and moving my family 90 miles (a relatively short move). I was concerned about implications for life insurance, medical insurance, and the fear I would take my family out of their comfort zone and possibly die two or three years later.

In the end, and after much discussion and reassurance from my wife, I decided to go for it rather than live stifled by fear of the unknown. I have a unique opportunity; something I've looked for a long time, and I certainly would do it if there was no PCa in my life.

Now, I just hope (and pray) the first post-SRT PSA in May comes back undetectable...
Diagnosed at 47 (currently 50). Pre-surgery PSA: 13.7 Pre-surgery Gleason: 4+3=7. CT Scan, Bone Scan, PET Scan: Clear. LRP 5/28/08. Left nerve bundle removed. POST-SURGERY: Gleason: 4+3=7; 10% of prostate all quadrants involved; EPE left base & apex; extensive PNI present. Bladder neck, lymphvasular space, seminal vesicles, 17 examined lymph nodes, and all surgical margins FREE of tumor. T3a. Four-week post-surgical PSA = 0.1; Seven-week = .01; 10/08 – 4/10 PSA= 0.0; 4/10=0.1; 5/10 & 8/10 = 0.1; 9/10=.15; Prostiscint = negative; 12/10=0.3. 12/15/10 began 70.2 grays SRT and will finish 10/10/11.

Ed C. (Old67)
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2009
Total Posts : 2457
   Posted 3/25/2011 5:04 PM (GMT -6)   
David,
Your pathological report looks good, small prostate, only 5% cancerous, negative margins,and no SVI involvement. I'll be amazed if you didn't become a new member of the zero club. If your 1st PSA is a zero go for it and don't look back.
Age: 67 at Dx on 12/30/08 PSA 3.8
2 cores out of 12 were positive Gleason (4+4)
Davinci surgery 2/9/09 Gleason 4+4 EPE,
Margins clear, nerve bundles removed
Prostate weighed 57 grams 10-20% involved
all PSA tests since (2, 5, 8, 11, 15, 18, 21 months) undetectable
Latest PSA test (2 years) <.008 ?

Purgatory
Elite Member


Date Joined Oct 2008
Total Posts : 25364
   Posted 3/25/2011 5:08 PM (GMT -6)   
kark, yours was a good story, I for one, am glad you are going for it. Nothing is worse than sailing in the sea of regrets later.

btw, you might want to fix your signature, it shows that you will be having radiation for almost 10 months, an obvious typo, you would sure be glowing after that, lol.

david in sc
Age: 58, 56 dx, PSA: 7/07 5.8, 10/08 16.3
3rd Biopsy: 9/08 7 of 7 Positive, 40-90%, Gleason 4+3
open RP: 11/08, on catheters for 101 days
Path Rpt: Gleason 3+4, pT2c, 42g, 20% cancer, 1 pos marg
Incont & ED: None
Post Surgery PSA: 2/09 .05,5/09 .1, 6/09 .11. 8/09 .16
Post SRT PSA: 1/10 .12, 4/8 .04, 8/6 .06 2/11 1.24
Latest: 6 Corr Surgeries to Bladder Neck, SP Catheter since 10/1/9, SRT 39 Sess/72 gy ended 11/09, 21 Catheters, Ileal Conduit Surgery 9/10,

JNF
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2010
Total Posts : 3655
   Posted 3/26/2011 7:34 AM (GMT -6)   
From 1989-2000 we lived in Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and China. Our three sons completed their middle school and high school in excellent International schools receiving both US high school diplomas and the European equivalent. Their AP courses were robust enough that they all received 100% of their freshman year of college credit thus greatly reducing the time and money it took to get their bachelor's degrees. They traveled the area, learned the languages, developed beter and it was great. In the middle of this my wife was very effectively treated for breast cancer with lumpectomy, chemo, and radiation. The treatment was done in the US and took about 5 months. Everything worked out well for all of us.

Go for it David. Your PCa is not in the way. For all you know you have received all the treatment you will ever need. If there is a need for followup ADT, it can be done anywhere....pills and shots. If you need SRT...they do that in Italy on the same machones as we have here or you can return to the US.

Taking an adventure like this will make you feel very good and I think that our attitude and feelings are a great defense against the cancer. Meyers starts his book with this concept. He relates that the people that are optimistic, oportunistic, and happy do better. Think of two years in Rome as a healthy part of your treatment and one of the best things you can do for family and their personal growth.

Best wishes and vivere la bella vita!

Jack
PSA 59 on 8-26-2010 age 60. Biopsy 9-8-2010 12/12 positive, 20-80% involved, PNI in 3 cores, G 3+3,3+4,and 4+3=G7, T2b.
Eligard shot and daily Jalyn started on 10-7-2010.
IMRT to prostate and lymph nodes 25 fractions started on 11-8-2010, HDR Brachytherapy 12-6 and 13-2010.
PSA <.1 and T 23 on 2-3-2011.

davidg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 3/26/2011 12:36 PM (GMT -6)   
lovely answers/posts here, thanks.

Jack, great post. Just read it to my wife. Interesting about the advanced placement courses, we hadn't even thought of that. We went to Singapore last summer and the kids loved it. My son was on a quest to eat anything he could find including BBQ Stingray and frog porridge.

Ed - thanks for a post that makes me feel good.

Logoslidat - funny, when my wife and I talk about Italy potentially being too far and too much of a change for the kids we always say that we still want to do something exciting and that Maui might be an option.

Kark - what life insurance implications? I hadn't even considered that.

Anyway, we are proceeding with real estate agents, school applications etc. etc. If everything lines up, and renting our house is what really needs to happen, I think we'll end up doing this.

Kark60
Regular Member


Date Joined Jun 2008
Total Posts : 91
   Posted 3/26/2011 5:31 PM (GMT -6)   
@davidg...Before my diagnosis, I purchased 5x my annual salary in fairly cheap life insurance through my employer because I was married, the primary "bread-winner" and we had two very young kids at the time. I kept-up the premiums ever since, especially after diagnosis, surgery, recurrence, and SRT. My concern was by changing jobs I would lose this supplemental life insurance, which protects my wife and two young kids (currently age 9 and 7). I didn't want to take a new job and not be able to get extra life insurance, since the basic "no physical needed" amount would only be 150% of annual salary versus the current 5x annual salary I have with my current job. My new employer requires "good health" to be eligible to purchase low-cost supplementary life insurance up to $250,000 beyond 150% of annual salary. I am very confident I won't qualify given my circumstances!!

However, I learned my current supplemental coverage is "portable" without a physical. The premiums are a bit more expensive when I leave my current employment, but certainly affordable and I can keep the coverage along with the peace of mind if this PCa situation goes "south."

I also discussed the possibility of a new job with the radiation oncologist. She was unequivocally supportive and encouraged me to make the job change.

@Purgatory... I changed my profile. Thanks for the proof-read...
Diagnosed at 47 (currently 50). Pre-surgery PSA: 13.7 Pre-surgery Gleason: 4+3=7. CT Scan, Bone Scan, PET Scan: Clear. LRP 5/28/08. Left nerve bundle removed. POST-SURGERY: Gleason: 4+3=7; 10% of prostate all quadrants involved; EPE left base & apex; extensive PNI present. Bladder neck, lymphvasular space, seminal vesicles, 17 examined lymph nodes, and all surgical margins FREE of tumor. T3a. Four-week post-surgical PSA = 0.1; Seven-week = .01; 10/08 – 4/10 PSA= 0.0; 4/10=0.1; 5/10 & 8/10 = 0.1; 9/10=.15; Prostiscint = negative; 12/10=0.3. 12/15/10 began 70.2 grays SRT and finished 2/10/11.

Worried Guy
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2009
Total Posts : 3732
   Posted 3/26/2011 6:26 PM (GMT -6)   
David G

Do it! We lived in Japan for 9 years and loved every bit of it. The kids learned to be citizens of the world. You will be giving yours a priceless gift.
Don't worry about any health related issues. If you need to see your doc you can come back to the US faster than you can schedule the appointment.

I say we have a GFMPH event at your house in Dec. You'll be all settled in by then. If you need someone to carry your bags, give me a call.

Ciao,
Jeff

geezer99
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2009
Total Posts : 990
   Posted 3/26/2011 8:38 PM (GMT -6)   
Go, go, go. Over the last ten years we have lived 2 and 1/2 in Hungary. We put our son in Hungarian public school for 5th grade, back for half of eight grade and back for his junior year of high school. Given the chance, we would go in a minute. It was so great to become part of another culture and when he got to college he skipped the language requirement because he was rated as a "native speaker" of Hungarian

Medical care is more primitive, but other parts of Europe are close with care as good as any in the US
Age at diagnosis 66, PSA 5.5
Biopsy 12/08 12 cores, 8 positive
Gleason 3+4=7
CAT scan, Bone scan 1/09 both negative.

Robotic surgery 03/03/09 Catheter Out 03/08/09
Pathology: Lymph nodes & Seminal vesicles negative
Margins positive, Capsular penetration extensive Gleason 4+3=7
6 weeks: 1 pad/day, 1 pad/night -- mostly dry at night.
10 weeks: no pad at night -- slight leakage day/1 pad.
3 mo. PSA 0.0 - now light pads
6 mo. PSA 0.00 -- 1 light pad/day
9 mo. PSA 0.00 -- 1 light pad/day ED remains
12 mo. PSA 0.00 -- still one light pad and ED
16 mo PSA 0.00 -- light pad just for security, ED still an issue

davidg
Veteran Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 4093
   Posted 3/28/2011 7:48 PM (GMT -6)   
I'm going if the kids get accepted into the American school ( no reason they shouldn't) and provided we find the type of apt we want in the exact area we want. That's the iffy part because we do have a budget. I've really enjoyed and appreciated the answers here, great stuff.

Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 4083
   Posted 3/29/2011 1:54 PM (GMT -6)   
David, sorry I'm so late in catching up with your thread.  Of course I can't tell you what to do but I CAN tell you that my wife and daughter were with me for 5 glorious years in Europe while I was working there.  We had our daughter in American schools that were FANTASTIC, we paid up front for any routine local health care and were reinbursed by my company and we caught a plane back to the USA for the one major health issue we had during the 5 years.
 
The overseas living is not without its' challenges, especially for the family.  However, it was overall a fabulous experience for all of us and we would not trade it for anything.  It provided my wife and I with many opportunities to travel throughout Europe and the Middle East and provided our daughter with an experience that cannot be matched.  She also learned multiple languages that helps her in her job to this day.
 
Hope this perspective is helpful.
 
Tudpock (Jim)
Age 62 (64 now), G 3 + 4 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2/16 cancerous, 27cc. Brachytherapy 12/9/08. 73 Iodine-125 seeds. Procedure went great, catheter out before I went home, only minor discomfort. Everything continues to function normally as of 12/8/10. PSA: 6 mo 1.4, 1 yr. 1.0, 2 yr. .8. My docs are "delighted"! My journey:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=1305643&g=1305643#m1305643
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