Sleep Apnea and General Anesthesia

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Going for brachy
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 152
   Posted 5/24/2011 7:37 PM (GMT -6)   
I am going for seed implant with general anethesia. I have moderate sleep apnea. This may mean some precautions need to be taken during surgery. Does anyone been in the same situation?
__________________________________________________________________________
Age 70
Resident of DE, USA
PSA 3.4 January 2011
Biopsy Feb 2011 Gleason 3 + 3 T1C 2 out of 12 one 5% other 10%
Treatment option: Brachytherapy in the next 5 or 6 weeks
Volume study 5/3/11 49 cc

clocknut
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2010
Total Posts : 2667
   Posted 5/24/2011 8:13 PM (GMT -6)   
I have severe sleep apnea, and I made sure I mentioned it to the surgeon and the anesthesiologist, and it wasn't a problem.  You'll be intubated, so the apnea shouldn't come into play during the surgery.
 
However, the tube can leave your airway sore and swollen, which can cause extra problems for apnea sufferers after surgery. 
 
Try to arrange with the hospital to take your own CPAP machine to he hospital.  The machine they gave me from the inhalation dept. was horrible.  It seemed to be overpowered, even though I told them the pressure setting I wanted.  Then, when I asked them to lower the pressure for the third night of my stay, they said they couldn't do that without a doctor's order....this in spite of the fact that I was the one who told them the pressure setting in the first place.
 
Their machine was also very loud, whereas mine is perfectly quiet.  I don't use a humidifier, but had them add one to their hospital machine to help with the swollen airway.
 
Be sure to take  your own mask.
 
I think those are the biggest considerations.  If I think of anything else, I'll try to add them later.  Good luck.
 
 

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 5/25/2011 3:09 AM (GMT -6)   
I have mild sleep apnea but I snore like a freight train... or so I've been told. Have also had three  surgeries in the past five years and the subject never came up.
 
As Clocknut mentioned - you'll be incubated so it shouldn't be an issue.

tatt2man
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jan 2010
Total Posts : 2842
   Posted 5/25/2011 4:10 AM (GMT -6)   
I have central and obstructive sleep apnea - I just told the docs the situation, so they had an extra person watching my breathing levels during surgery
-I had no problems with breathing or tubes or pain due to that - and I brought my own machine for use in my hospital room - it was not an issue at all.
-all the best
BRONSON
Age:55 -gay with spouse of 14 years, Steve -Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
PSA:10/06/09 3.86
Biopsy:10/16/09- 2 of 12 cancerous, 5% involvement -Gleason 7 (3+4)
Radical Prostatectomy:11/18/09
Pathology:pT3a -Gleason 7 -extraprostatic extension -perineural invasion -prostate weight -34.1 gm
PSA:04/08/10 -0.05 -Zero Club
PSA:09/23/10 -0.05 -Zero Club
PSA:03/24/11 -0.02 -Zero Club
PSA:03/24/12- TBA

mvesr
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2007
Total Posts : 823
   Posted 6/1/2011 8:05 AM (GMT -6)   
Just be sure to let the Drs. know about it. Get them to let you bring your own machine to the Hospital, should not be a problem.

Mika
age at dx 54 now 59
psa at dx 4.3

got the bad news 1/29/07

open surgery Duke Medical Center 5-29-07

never more than 2 pads

ED is getting better

the shots work great, still can't give them to myself

three years of zero's

Retired again after 36 years February 1, 2010

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3741
   Posted 6/1/2011 11:27 AM (GMT -6)   
The anesthesiologist is a key man in the operation room, he is the boss actually.. You should have a little talk with him in pre-op..The breathing tube they shove down your throat (you will be unconscious) can cause side-effects all it's own..I talked like Donald Duck for a month after surgery....

The best of luck to you!
Age 68.
PSA age 55: 3.5, DRE normal.
age 58: 4.5
61: 5.2
64: 7.5, DRE "Abnormal"
65: 8.5, " normal", biopsy, 12 core, negative...
66 9.0 "normal", 2ed biopsy, negative, BPH, Proscar
67 4.5 DRE "normal"
68 7.0 3rd biopsy positive, 4 out of 12, G-6,7, 9
RALP Sept 3 2010, pos margin, one pos vesicle nodes neg. Post Op PSA 0.9 SRT, HT. 2-15-'11 PSA 0.0

az4peaks
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 112
   Posted 6/24/2011 1:31 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi going for Brachy, - Let me correct an erroneous statement made above. In the surgical suite, it is the Surgeon that is ALWAYS in charge, the Captain of the ship, so to speak. This is true both traditionally and legally.

However, it is VERY important that you advise the Anesthesiologist of any information that could impact the administration and/or management of the drugs used to render you unconscious. Normally, you should be interviewed, often just before you enter the operating room, while in the "prep" area, asking such questions as, "do you have false teeth or other loose impediments in your mouth?" , "are you allergic to any medications"?, etc., etc.. because he/she has primary responsibility for that aspect of the operative procedure.

Like a well run ship, it is great team work that provides the best cruise, but someone has to be in charge, and in the operating room, it is, technically the Surgeon. - John@newPCa.org (aka) az4peaks

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3741
   Posted 6/25/2011 8:17 PM (GMT -6)   
What does the anesthesiologist do during the surgery?

In short, the anesthesiologist is responsible for your comfort and your safety. In addition to giving you the medications needed for the anesthesia, the anesthesiologist monitors your vital signs (such things as heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen content, body temperature, breathing...) and alters them as necessary. He or she is also in charge of fluids that you might receive and, if necessary, blood transfusions. Lastly, any other medical conditions that you might have (diabetes, asthma, hypertension, heart problems) will be treated by the anesthesiologist while you are in their care.

Going for brachy
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 152
   Posted 6/26/2011 9:36 AM (GMT -6)   
Thanks for the helpful responses. My brachytherapy procedure was done on Monday, June 20 and sleep apnea was no issue at all. I was fully awake within half an our of the completion of the procedure.
__________________________________________________________________________
Age 70
Resident of DE, USA
PSA 3.4 January 2011
Biopsy Feb 2011 Gleason 3 + 3 T1C 2 out of 12 one 5% other 10%
Treatment option: Brachytherapy eks
Volume study 5/3/11 49 cc
Seed Implant 6/20/2011 88 Iodine-125 seeds
Blood in urine for about three days
No change in frequency. No urgency

Gleason 6
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2011
Total Posts : 876
   Posted 6/26/2011 11:22 AM (GMT -6)   
Going for B,
 
That is great news.  I'm glad to hear you are doing so well.  Did they suggest that you go for follow up radiation (IGRT)?
Age 61 Active. No ED/flow problem
PSA 4.3 9/10
PSA 5.5 2/11
PSA 7.1 3/11
PSA 6.73 5/18/11
Template Biopsy 6 pos out of 18 GS 6 (3+3)
CT scan neg
6/18 areas positive-2 in left base, 4 left apex. 6/40 cores pos. 33cc.
Stage T1C
4/14/11 Met with Dr Crum - Urologist
5/4/11 Met with Dr. Wehle Mayo Urologist
5/17/11 Met with Dr. Buskirk Mayo r/o
6/13/11 Met with Dr Terk at FROG (for seed consultation)

Going for brachy
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 152
   Posted 6/26/2011 1:11 PM (GMT -6)   
 
At the moment I am not supposed to undergo any external radiation treatment. On August 4, the RO will evaluate the seed implant. If everything went as planned, I am not going to have any treatment. The it would be only routine PSA checkup.
__________________________________________________________________________
Age 70
Resident of DE, USA
PSA 3.4 January 2011
Biopsy Feb 2011 Gleason 3 + 3 T1C 2 out of 12 one 5% other 10%
Treatment option: Brachytherapy eks
Volume study 5/3/11 49 cc
Seed Implant 6/20/2011 88 Iodine-125 seeds
Blood in urine for about three days
No change in frequency. No urgency

az4peaks
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2011
Total Posts : 112
   Posted 6/26/2011 4:36 PM (GMT -6)   
Hi Fairwind, - I don't disagree with the contents of your latest Post above, nor even most of your previous post. Here is the statement you made in your initial Post.

"The anesthesiologist is a key man in the operation room, HE IS THE BOSS ACTUALLY." (emphasis mine!)

I heartily agree with the portion of the sentence aappearing in regular print and DISAGREE with the portion, I have emphasized with CAPITALIZATION, and I previously explained why. But, you are certainly entitled to believe as you wish.

My clarification was more intended for other readers, who I wish not to be misinformed, and they will each have to judge for themselves which of us is correct.

I don't generally publish my medical history or my professional background, because I try to provide reliable, unbiased, scientifically based information and my anecdotal results, or anyone elses, are not really pertinent to others choices and decisions. Much more reliable, are the collective results of peer- reviewed, published results from the medical literature, that eventually result in consensus "best practice" Standards.

However, anyone who would feel better in briefly knowing my professional background and medical history, can send me an E-mail request and I will be happy to reply by forwarding it to you. - John@newPCa.org (aka) az4peaks

Fairwind
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2010
Total Posts : 3741
   Posted 6/26/2011 7:08 PM (GMT -6)   
I have been told by several sources that when things get sideways in the O.R, it's usually the anesthesiologist who takes charge and directs traffic in an effort to save the patients life. If the patient starts going downhill, it is the anesthesiologist who informs the surgeon there is a problem and action must be taken. While the surgeon has a specific job to do, and directs traffic as long as things are going smoothly, if things get out of control, the anesthesiologist is the one who overrules everyone in his effort to save the patients life..

I am not a doctor and this is just my opinion...

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 6/27/2011 3:40 AM (GMT -6)   
hmmmmmm. From where the anesthesiologist is sitting - can he see that a major artery we nicked and a ton of blood is pouring out? I guess he'd know that blood presure is dropping.... but I'd want the surgical team to insist an bag of blood is needed and to fix the boo boo..

Going for brachy
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2011
Total Posts : 152
   Posted 6/27/2011 9:07 AM (GMT -6)   
This thread is going in a completely in a different direction. I had my seed implant. Sleep apnea was not a issue at all.
__________________________________________________________________________
Age 70
Resident of DE, USA
PSA 3.4 January 2011
Biopsy Feb 2011 Gleason 3 + 3 T1C 2 out of 12 one 5% other 10%
Treatment option: Brachytherapy eks
Volume study 5/3/11 49 cc
Seed Implant 6/20/2011 88 Iodine-125 seeds
Blood in urine for about three days
No change in frequency. No urgency

Steve n Dallas
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2008
Total Posts : 4829
   Posted 6/27/2011 9:57 AM (GMT -6)   

Sorry rolleyes

It happens from time to time...

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