Father Just Diagnosed G8

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tinterer
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Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 1/20/2017 4:28 PM (GMT -7)   
Hello - I am posting for my father, my family is in a state of shock as he learned on 1/18 he has PC. I have done preliminary research and it looks like this forum is a great avenue for support and knowledge, so thank you in advance. Some stats from my dad:

Age 69 - VERY fit, works out 5 days a week, health of 60 yr old or younger
PSA 10/16 - 5.1 (noted as high, was told to take test again in a couple months)
PSA 12/16 - 10.7 (Biopsy scheduled)
Biopsy results - 12/12 cores prostatic adenocarcinoma present, GS 8 on all samples, surface area being cancerous ranging from 55% to 100%

We are in the Northern California area and right now he is getting a CT scan today and bone scan in the next week or two with follow up consultation with a urologist in two weeks.

His PSA level not being as high as some others makes me feel a little better but his biopsy report to be honest has me very concerned. He is a fighter and has a positive attitude, knows he's got a rough road ahead of him but not knowing a strategy of how to attack it yet has us nervous. I am telling him he needs to get multiple consultations as I am not sure the urologist he has been dealing with is a specific cancer specialist or not. Any information, experiences of anyone that had a similar biopsy or positive thoughts are much appreciated!

Also, please don't sugarcoat. I'd rather know what your real thoughts are rather than nothing at all or false hope

Post Edited (tinterer) : 1/20/2017 11:35:30 PM (GMT-7)


Manfred
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2016
Total Posts : 95
   Posted 1/20/2017 4:39 PM (GMT -7)   
tinterer

I know that the news is devastating but there is hope for your father.

I was diagnosed a year ago with Gleason 8 in one sample, Gleason 6's and 7's in 8 other samples. You can see my treatment plan in my signature.

Once you get the bone scan and CT scan results, Dad can discuss treatment options with his urologist.

Also, it's a good idea to get the biopsy slides read by another pathologist, preferably one with extensive experience in reading PCa

Lots of things for you and Dad to learn.

Good luck.
67 yrs - DX (age 66) Jan 4 2016 20 cores, 9 positive, GL 8
Bone and CT scans on 1-12-2016 - neg

PSA 10-15 2.22; 02-16 0.62; Apr-16 0.17; Jul-16 0.02; Sep-16 0.01; Dec 16 0.01; T = 32

Treatment Lupron 1-12-16
IMRT- 25 doses completed 3-30-2016
LD Brach Seeds on 5-10-16; 6 month Lupron Shot 5-13-16
No additional ADT at this time

tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 1/20/2017 4:53 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Manfred, appreciate the good wishes and advice.

Also forgot to mention his DRE was a slightly enlarged prostate, otherwise nothing notable found.

celebrate life
Veteran Member


Date Joined Dec 2014
Total Posts : 2082
   Posted 1/21/2017 12:27 AM (GMT -7)   
Hi tinterer,
Welcome to the HW forum. We are also in Northern CA. On the coast. Tall Allen recommends specialists at UCSF for treatment. What that tx will entail depends upon the results of his scans. That's a lot of G 8 cancer in his biopsy and his PSA rose quickly. Prostate cancer tends to spread to the bones first, so that is where metastasis would likely be found, if there is spread. No sugar coating, once it's spread, a cure is unlikely. HOWEVER, even with metastasis, PCa can be well controlled for a very long time. Especially if you have a good team and good health. So while you are understandably reeling from this dx, take heart and have hope. Best case scenario, there is no spread, and I would still urge you to find the best team around to treat your Dad pronto.
Good luck and keep us posted. Everyone here is always so helpful and caring.
Beth
DH 52@dx 2010
PSA:1983 G 4+5=9 extensive mets bones and nodes
Docetaxel, Zytiga 2012 Smarium, Xtandi 2013 xofigo 2014
Cabazitaxel, Zytiga rerun
Ongoing:xgeva + Lupron
RT sacrum X 10
PSA 1/15 100
2/15 liver mets
DRibbles trial 3/15 PSA:259
6/15:Psa 900
docetaxil PSA 7/15:1054 9/15:921;12/15:1008 retry xtandi
1/16:665 3/16:1316 ascites Start mitoxantrone 8/16:792 10/16:590 12/16:532 1/17:412

Post Edited (celebrate life) : 1/21/2017 12:30:36 AM (GMT-7)


tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 1/21/2017 10:26 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks for the reply and suggestions Beth, very much appreciated. I have definitely heard great things about UCSF

Tall Allen
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2012
Total Posts : 8951
   Posted 1/21/2017 12:54 PM (GMT -7)   
So far, all you know is that he is in the "high risk" category, which means that aggressive treatment may still cure him. After his bone scan and CT, he'll know more. If metastases are detected, the disease can be managed for a long time, but not cured. That will determine which doctor he ought to visit next, and you are lucky to have so many good ones at UCSF and Stanford.

It is usually a good idea to get a second opinion from Epstein at Johns Hopkins on his biopsy slides. But with that much GS 8, it probably won't change, and if the bone scan is positive, it won't matter anyway.

Keep us in the loop.
Allen - not an MD
•PSA=7.3, prostate volume=55cc, 8/17 cores G6 5-35% involvement
SBRT 9 yr onc. resultsSBRT 7 yr QOL results
•treated 10/2010 at age 57 at UCLA,PSA now: 0.1,no lasting urinary, rectal or sexual SEs
my PC blog

Dr WHO
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2016
Total Posts : 280
   Posted 1/22/2017 6:28 AM (GMT -7)   
From one G 8 to another I wish you and your father well. Hopefully the scans will come back negative, but even if they do not there is still hope. The doctors may have to be a bit more agressive. Please take the time to get a second opinion. Remember that every cancer is different and the treatments may be different. That was (is) the case for me. I had surgery (with the removal of 14 lymph nodes), radiation and hormonal therapy. (Most G 8'ers who's cancer has spread to the lymph nodes do not go for/are offered surgery.)

While rare, please know that not all prostate cancers raise your PSA. Chances are that your father does not have one of these very rare forms such as small cell or Ductal. They effect less than 1% of the cases. Look on the biopsy report for the description of the cancer. For example I have Ductal cancer which effects about 0.4% of prostate cancer patients.

Finally please know that while having cancer sucks it does make you appreciate life, family and friends. I hope your father continues living an active life. That is what I am trying to do (just got back from a Scuba trip).
58 when diagnosed
4/18/2016 DaVinci surgery
Gleason 8 (4+4) T3aN1Mx ductal Stage 4 D1 prostate 74 g, 1/14 lymth nodes "100%" cancer.
PSA= 3.3 2014, 4.7 2015, after surgery 0.1 5/2016, < 0.1 Sept, Dec, 2016
6/2/2016 Lupron two year treatment
External radiation: 38 treatments ended 10/7/2016
Leakage June >750 g, July < 10 g

tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 1/22/2017 9:08 AM (GMT -7)   
Thanks everyone for the replies, it is very much appreciated to hear others advice and stories. We will definitely be getting second opinions, if not more. I will update with test results as they come in. This has definitely put alot of things back into perspective for us all.

Tudpock18
Forum Moderator


Date Joined Sep 2008
Total Posts : 3958
   Posted 1/22/2017 9:43 AM (GMT -7)   
Hello Tinterer and a belated welcome to HW. You are already getting some great advice from some of our most knowledgeable members and I wish you and your dad well.

Sorry you were faced with a post from a member suggesting you leave HW; I have deleted those posts. That is not in the spirit of our forum and I assure you that you are most welcome here. Our members have a lot of support and advice to provide and I hope you will continue to avail yourself of this great forum.

Jim
Forum Moderator-Prostate Cancer. Age 62 (69 now), G 3 + 4 = 7, T1C, PSA 4.2, 2/16 cancerous, 27cc. Brachytherapy 12/9/08. 73 Iodine-125 seeds. Everything continues to function normally. PSA: 6 mo: 1.4, 1 yr: 1.0, 2 yr: .8, 3 yr: .5, 4/5 yr: .2, 6 yr: .1, 7 yr: .1. My docs are "delighted"! My journey:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=1305643&g=1305643#m1

logoslidat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 5383
   Posted 1/22/2017 11:09 AM (GMT -7)   
Bolo, please reference the email I sent you. The PCa mods are in agreement.

Jim

Post Edited By Moderator (Tudpock18) : 1/22/2017 12:03:01 PM (GMT-7)


tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 1/27/2017 12:01 PM (GMT -7)   
Update: So we received the results of his CT scan, bone scan is still scheduled for next week. He has an appointment for Feb 10th with Dr. Carroll at UCSF for a consultation. See below for pelvic area results of CT scan:

Pelvis: Bladder is underdistended limiting its evaluation..
Prostate measures 5.2 cm in the transverse diameter contains
right paracentral calcification and mildly heterogeneous. No
significant stranding seen surrounding the prostate or the
seminal vesicles. On series 2 image 65, there is a irregular 3.7
x 2.5 cm soft tissue nodule with central areas of decreased
attenuation suggesting necrosis seen along the proximal internal
iliac chain. 2 enlarged left obturator lymph nodes are seen on
series 2 image 66 and 68 measuring 1.3 x 1.0 and 1.2 x 1.0 cm,
respectively. An enlarged right obturator node is also seen on
series 2 image 71 measuring 1.2 x 0.9 cm. There is a small 5 mm
right lateral vesicle node on image 72. A 1.0 x 0.8 cm left
external iliac node is seen on image 72. Tiny nodes also seen in
the right external iliac chain. No pelvic free fluid. No fluid
collection. No inguinal lymphadenopathy.


IMPRESSION:
1. Positive regional nodal involvement specifically involving
at least the right internal iliac and bilateral obturator nodal
chain.
2. There are additionally nonspecific subcentimeter short axis
external iliac , periaortic and perigastric nodes.


If I am reading the results of his CT scan correctly, it appears his regional lymph nodes are cancerous... It looks like maybe only 5 of them may be compromised but not sure if the CT scans are able to scan all of the nodes or if those are just the ones the scan detected. Also not sure exactly what the other note about the nonspecific external nodes means... I think that might be good since they are small?

Any insight into these findings would be appreciated.

Much Thanks

tennisplayer
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2016
Total Posts : 323
   Posted 1/27/2017 1:23 PM (GMT -7)   
Tinterer-
Welcome to the forum. You're in the right place for support and information.

Wish I knew more about your CT scan report. I've never had to read one, although I've had a few! Don't know how many docs we have here, but someone should know something.

Bottom line is Gleason 8 is a higher risk, but based on what I read here, many G8's are living productive lives long after their diagnosis. You are in an area with good teaching hospitals. Make sure you get other opinions.

Good luck to your father. He's just a bit older than I am.
Age at diagnosis-66 Diagnosed 6/16, PSA rise, then biopsy.
RALP 10/16 at U of Chicago, Dr. Shalhav. Experienced internal bleeding post op requiring transfusion of 2 units.
Pathology Gleason 3+4=7, tumor volume 15% Margins negative except for one focal margin, .1mm
pT2c,N0,MX,R1
PSA @ 6 wks <0.02

logoslidat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2009
Total Posts : 5383
   Posted 1/27/2017 9:32 PM (GMT -7)   
What does your medical team have to say?
open surgery,1 nerve bundle spared 10/09 gl9 {4+3-tert 5}last psa0.15 holding steady
73 all posts arguable as in a court of law.dots can not be connected until seen-living the dream..

tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 2/3/2017 10:29 AM (GMT -7)   
Update: CT scan and Bone Scan results came back. Bone scan was clean, which was a huge relief, but CT scan shows regional lymphnode involvement. His current urologist is recommending ADT (which I believe is hormone therapy?) with possible XRT (which I believe is radiation therapy??). She (his urologist) didn't recommend getting surgery, which from what I have read online is a bit surprising. It seems like getting the prostate removed along with the regional lymphnodes would be considered as more of an option, but she basically suggested why go through that surgery when he could just do hormone therapy and that would do the same thing? I feel like he might be more inclined to just have it removed but has anyone had the ADT and XRT treatments??

He is getting a second opinion with UCSF next Friday, so that will obviously dictate a lot with regards to which treatment we end up going with.

Thanks in advance for any information!

SpecialLady
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2011
Total Posts : 1022
   Posted 2/3/2017 11:55 AM (GMT -7)   
The thing to consider with radiation of prostate (and surrounding lymph nodes) is that it is just as effective as surgery for eliminating cancer, especially in high-risk cases. Tall Allen can give you all the numbers and study names, he knows them well.

For high risk cases, when the cancer has escaped the prostate, surgery is not recommended. I believe your urologist is giving you good advice. We see often on this board, men with high-risk cases who were recommended surgery, where even I, a lay person with some knowledge of PC thought this kind of advice was irresponsible. And sure enough, some months later, their PSA starts to rise. In which case men can still opt for radiation of the prostate bed (where prostate used to be), but because the prostate is missing now, the organs like bladder and colon are unprotected and they may get damaged by the radiation, and suffer more or less serious side-effects.

Something to keep in mind when discussing options with the doctors. Absolutely no reason to sugarcoat it. You and your father are in for a marathon. It does help that he is fit. Helps enormously. Hormone therapy (ADT) lowers testosteron, men lose some muscle tone, may get depressed easier, feel more tired, and the more fit you are, the less it affects you. Some doctors say "heart healthy" equals "prostate healthy"...keep us updated
Father diagnosed in Jan2011 (at age 68)
DRE positive, PSA 7.5, biopsy Gleason 7 and 8.
Bone scan positive: VL5 and pubic bone
Feb2011: Start hormonal therapy (Trelstar+Casodex)
Jan2012: 0.055
May2012 - May2014: ADT2 Pause, new spot on sacrum, PSA 7.08
May2014: start ADT2
May2015: stop ADT2
Jan2017: PSA 2.23 (still on HT holiday...praying it lasts long)

Michael_T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 2540
   Posted 2/3/2017 2:36 PM (GMT -7)   
If your dad has surgery, due to the lymph node involvement he would need radiation as well. It sounds to me like the recommendation is to cut to the chase and start with radiation instead. That is fairly typical with higher risk cases--I was a G9 and that was the way I went. Your dad is also on the older side for surgery at age 69, so I would guess that his age is also part of the thinking.

Are you meeting with a radiation oncologist at UCSF? You would need to talk to a good RO to get more info on the radiation side.

And yes, ADT is hormone therapy and it's typically used in conjunction with radiation. I did 18 months of that as part of my treatment--it's not particularly fun, but it's doable.
Age 56, Diagnosed at 51
PSA 9.6, Gleason: 9 (5+4), three 7s (3+4)
Chose triple play of HDR brachy, IMRT and HT (Casodex, Lupron and Zytiga)
Completed HT (18 months) in April 2014
11/16: T = 111, PSA = 0.18

tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 2/3/2017 4:45 PM (GMT -7)   
Thanks Michael_T and SpecialLady for your responses, much appreciated. Michael I was wondering if you could expand on your last comment, what specific side affects and everything made the treatment not particularly fun? Also I was wondering if you still have any side affects currently affecting you or if you feel like you are back to normal or close to it?

Michael_T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 2540
   Posted 2/3/2017 6:14 PM (GMT -7)   
Hormone therapy uses drugs to reduce your testosterone to what they call "castrate level." The most bothersome SEs for me (and most guys) are some pretty intensive hot flashes, loss of muscle tone, energy and weigh gain. It also completely crushes your libido. But in general, I felt like it aged me about 15 years. On the plus side, for most people your testosterone comes back to normal after treatment stops. In my case, my T only came back about halfway--in general the worst SEs are gone, but I feel like I'm still missing a bit of spring in my step.

PCa needs testosterone to grow so cutting it off quickly stops the cancer in its tracks for most guys and PSA drops very, very low. In terms of radiation, it sensitizes the cancer cells and makes them more susceptible to being wiped out by the radiation.
Age 56, Diagnosed at 51
PSA 9.6, Gleason: 9 (5+4), three 7s (3+4)
Chose triple play of HDR brachy, IMRT and HT (Casodex, Lupron and Zytiga)
Completed HT (18 months) in April 2014
11/16: T = 111, PSA = 0.18

tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 2/28/2017 3:36 PM (GMT -7)   
Update: Had initial consultation with UCSF team and saw medical oncologist, was scheduled for and had a PSMA Pet/CT scan last week to see if affected lymphnodes were localized or in other areas of the lymphnode system. (Apparently this test is only available at 3 locations in the US, so very lucky to be where we are). He hasn't had a follow up consultation yet with UCSF, but met with his oncologist in his local area yesterday and the scan came back clean, so affected lymphnodes are only in the pelvic region.

There are some complications with the size of his tumor, it is very large and near his rectum so Dr. Carroll at UCSF mentioned most likely start with hormone therapy to hopefully shrink the size of the tumor, and then proceed with either surgery or radiation therapy. He has another consultation with UCSF next week to get started on treatment.

We are very grateful this hasn't spread throughout and while he is not looking forward to his treatment, we are hopeful that whichever treatment we go with will get him cancer free.

tennisplayer
Regular Member


Date Joined Nov 2016
Total Posts : 323
   Posted 2/28/2017 3:49 PM (GMT -7)   
Glad you got some better news. It also sounds like you have found a good care team. His future looks brighter. Thanks for updating us.
Age at diagnosis-66 Diagnosed 6/16, PSA rise, then biopsy.
RALP 10/16 at U of Chicago, Dr. Shalhav. Experienced internal bleeding post op requiring transfusion of 2 units.
Pathology Gleason 3+4=7, tumor volume 15% Margins negative except for one focal margin, .1mm
pT2c,N0,MX,R1
PSA @ 6 wks <0.02;16 wks <0.02
My storywww.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=3777359

snowcake
Regular Member


Date Joined Feb 2017
Total Posts : 139
   Posted 2/28/2017 4:16 PM (GMT -7)   
hi tinterer! welcome to the forum and i'm so sorry to hear about your dad.

our family went through similar feelings back in 2010 when my dad was first diagnosed, with a gleason 7 initially but upgraded to a gleason 8 after the pathology on the prostate after surgery.

my dad opted for surgery as there was no evidence of spread outside (though having said this, i'm currently at a stage where i'm unsure if his uro even checked this...more on that later!) the surgery didn't get rid of everything as PSA didn't go to undetectable after surgery so he then did radiation of the prostate bed as well as lupron injections. he also hugely modified his diet - became mostly vegan, stopped all alcohol and sugar. he responded well to radiation and HT and PSA went down to 0.

the good news is that 7 years later, he is still alive and feeling great! unfortunately, he did have biochemical recurrence in january 2016 and a steady climb in PSA which the uro ignored until my dad got severe back pain this year and a lesion on the spine was found. right now we are waiting for a pathology report on this lesion (which was recently removed after he showed signs of spinal compression) though all the docs are saying they think it's a bone metastisis from the PC.

anyway the last few weeks i've been going over everything and here is some advice (though i'm not a doctor! this is just waht i wished we'd done early on, if we'd had the knowledge at the time) hopefully this will be of some help to you. try not to despair too much, there are so many advances being made in PC all the time and your dad still has years ahead...it's still controllable at this stage and from things i've seen, even curable. i wish him all the best and all the best to your family too! anyway, this is what i wish we'd done, in hindsight:

-Gleason 8 is aggressive...i'm not sure if our uro really grasped the seriousness of this (my dad had a low psa with a high gleason - a combo which is often an indicator of much more aggressive disease) and i feel he treated my dad's cancer as if it was less aggressive than it was. in light of this, i wish we'd seen a medical oncologist and also got a second opinion or consultation from someone who specialises in prostate cancer/aggressive prostate cancer - they may have a better grasp than a lot of uros imo and i wish we'd known or at least been referred to one

-There is a philosophy amongst some that aggressive cancer must be treated aggresively. i'm agreeing with that. i don't think gleason 8 and above can afford medical teams to be too lax and good experts will know this. also, it seems that oftentimes using certain treatmetns concurrently (instead of one after another) has shown good results

-timing of treatments is essential in these more aggressive cases and i personally don't trust docs who want to wait too long. our uro did and was super lax about the chemical recurrence (for over a year!) and took no action - there turned out to be a met! so that's another thing i'd do - is make sure that the monitoring is close and they take it seriously

hope everything works out. i've seen tons of gleason 8 cases where there is survival for many years and a good quality of life too. i feel for you because i know those emotions and fears well - we are going through the same again with the return of the cancer (and a possibly rare and aggressive variant of it) but you all have each other and your dad will get strength from you and your concern and support. you're doing great by informing yourself! and it's great he's got a child who is fighting his corner! this is such a great place for it with so many amazing, supportive and inspiration people smile will keep you and your dad in my thoughts and let us know how he gets on

tinterer
New Member


Date Joined Jan 2017
Total Posts : 10
   Posted 10/5/2017 2:13 PM (GMT -7)   
Just wanted to give an update for anyone else who is going through something similar:

My dad is still on hormone therapy (Lupron and Casadex (sp?)) but just finished 42 treatments of beam radiation last week, and had a CT scan and bone scan completed and his lymphnodes are all normal size now and he seems to have responded to the therapy as well as could have been hoped for. His PSA is <0.05, and at this point it will be a wait and see approach. The initial plan was to also have brachytherapy at the end of the beam radiation treatment, but that got changed due to his radiologist changing and not thinking it was necessary. He has a follow up consultation with another medical oncologist in the next couple weeks just to get a second opinion, but at this point he is very relieved that he has responded so well to the treatment. Regarding effects of the radiation, he didn't have many side affects until about halfway through, where he started having to go to the bathroom alot more and having pain while going. The mornings were especially difficult. The pain the last few weeks was definitely very evident, but he is improving every day since stopping. He didn't notice lack of energy very much, even at the end, but he works out a ton (continued working out through the treatment) so that might have helped with regard to his energy level.

I also just wanted to say thank you to anyone who commented on here and helped shed some light on the situation, it definitely helps having support of people/family members who have gone through a similar situation.

Fingers crossed that nothing pops back up and his PSA level stays low. He will continue taking Lupron for another year and a half, not sure what the plan will be past that.

Also FYI he had done quite a bit of research on going to a Vegan diet and the effects that has on cancer, and switched to Vegan through the treatment. Obviously not sure if this was a contributor to the success of his reaction to the treatments, but thought I would throw that out there. He is planning on remaining on a Vegan diet as well.

Thanks again and will update periodically.

Almost a 10
Veteran Member


Date Joined Mar 2014
Total Posts : 877
   Posted 10/5/2017 3:03 PM (GMT -7)   
Hi Tinterer,
Looks like I missed your thread altogether but wanted to congratulate you and your Dad for the great response he has had to treatment. Remember he still has his prostate so it will always produce a little PSA.
11/13 psa 240
DX 10/2013 PSA 187.5
PSA HIST 07/11,3.31;3/10,1.87,3/06,.87
Biopsy 10/28/13; 11/12 cores positive gs 9 (4+5)
BNSCN 12/09/2013 2 hot spots in spine
ADT 12/17/2013 22mg lupr, 50 mg Cas
BN biopsy 01/09/2013 neg
RALP 2/19/14 NN,LVI,Path T3BNX,MX, pros size 4.2 X 4 X 3 cm, 31 grm.Post Op PSA 3/14 .6, 6/14<.1;9/8,;.6;12/8, 1.2;3/9/15 3.9;6/2/15 23
12/14 CT SCAN; 1/15 BNSC

Michael_T
Veteran Member


Date Joined Sep 2012
Total Posts : 2540
   Posted 10/5/2017 3:49 PM (GMT -7)   
I remember your posts from before so I'm glad you checked back in with an update. I'm glad his PSA has been responding so well. Do keep us posted!
Age 56, Diagnosed at 51
PSA 9.6, Gleason: 9 (5+4), three 7s (3+4)
Chose triple play of HDR brachy, IMRT and HT (Casodex, Lupron and Zytiga)
Completed HT (18 months) in April 2014
3/17: T = 167, PSA = 0.13

cashlessclay
Regular Member


Date Joined Apr 2015
Total Posts : 125
   Posted 10/5/2017 8:09 PM (GMT -7)   
<< Also FYI he had done quite a bit of research on going to a Vegan diet and the
effects that has on cancer, and switched to Vegan through the treatment. . . He is
planning on remaining on a Vegan diet as well. >>


You may find this thread on "Personal Experience with Diet and Exercise" of interest.
It is about constructing a diet using feedback from ultrasensitive PSA test results.

www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=35&m=3515667

Cashless
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