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new pc diagnosis
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/24/2006 3:28 PM (GMT -7)   
VIEW IMAGEPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 10:01 pm    Post subject: Help, Prostate Cancer VIEW IMAGE VIEW IMAGE VIEW IMAGE

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I am a 60 year old, self employed independent business person that has been diagnosed with prostate cancer. I have a PSA of 4.85 and a gleason score of 6. Of the 10 biopsys taken, three had cancer (one showed 50%, one 25% and the third 15%).

I have to choose a treatment for the cancer, be it radiation or surgery. I have been advised by my surgeon that I will lose between 3 & 6 weeks of work if I have the surgery and 3 weeks if I have the radiation. Also, if I choose the surgery and the cancer returns, I can still have the radiation , where-as, if I choose the radiation and I have a return of the cancer in 7-10 years, surgery would not be available because of the effect the radiation would have on the prostate. I would have to choose an alternative treatment.

I am interested in hearing from folks that have had both types of treatment to see haw they fared afterwards. Questions that I have are things like:

Which treatment did you have and did the cancer return?
How much actual time did you have to stay away from your business?
How do you check the credentials of the surgeon or the radiation oncologist that you are seeing?
I have many other concerns but it sems that I am having difficulty putting them down art this moment.

I know that inconteneance and erectal disfunction are issues that will be a part of my life regardless of which treatment I choose.

Any help, suggestions, or web sites that you folks can provide would be most appreciated.

Thank you

 

 


new pc diagnosis
New Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 2
   Posted 9/24/2006 3:29 PM (GMT -7)   

jackcc
Regular Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 80
   Posted 9/24/2006 7:25 PM (GMT -7)   
It may help you to go to a site called    YANA.  These guys have experiences to share with you.   YANA means ....you are not alone.  Good luck.

SJC
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 113
   Posted 9/24/2006 8:06 PM (GMT -7)   
You ask some loaded questions. Each individual must make the decision for himself. All I can do is tell you what went through my mind. I asked what I thought was my future life span w/out pc; are my chances good that the cancer is confined to the prostate; am I willing to deal with potential (but not certain) side effects in return for a probable cancer cure?

I thought my chance for a life span greater than 15 yrs. was high (I'm 50). According to the Partin Table, I had a high percentage that the cancer was confined to the prostate. I concluded with an experienced surgeon, my chance for a cure with little side effects was also high. I opted for surgery.

The surgeon I selected specialized in the open, nerve-sparing procedure (as opposed to the robtic/lap procedure). I was not opposed to the robotic/lap procedure; however, I decided to pick my surgeon rather than the procedure. You will find that there are excellent surgeons who do one of the procedures or the other...none are experts at both. I didn't care so much if I had a little bit larger scar or if the catheter was in for a couple of days longer. That part was insignificant when you are talking about trying to find the best way to cure the cancer. So, I sought the surgeon with the most extensive experience and the highest credentials. I live in the South and flew to Baltimore for the procedure. I have an office job. Returned to work 12 days after surgery for 2-3 hours the first week; next week worked half days; following week 3/4 days; then full time after 30 days. Note: I'm 10 years younger than you and I was in good physical shape before the surgery. Had little continence issues. Pad free five weeks post-surgery. No transfusion necessary during surgery. In hospital two nights. Catheter for 10 days. Post surgery pathology report negative. Will take my first post surgery PSA in about a month. If the reading is negligible, I'm home free.

Suggest you go to the local bookstore and buy/read Dr. Patrick Walsh's Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer which provides good information about many of your questions. It's five years old, but there is a lot to learn from the book.

As far as finding the right surgeon/oncologist, suggest you go to the websites of the leading urological departments in the country: Johns Hopkins, Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinc, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, et al. They all have experts who have performed hundreds/thousands of the procedures you ask about. And that's what you want, someone with that kind of extensive experience.

Hope my message helps.

M. Kat
Veteran Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 715
   Posted 9/25/2006 4:52 AM (GMT -7)   
hello newly diagnosed.

My husband (56) had a high PSA reading (9) from his yearly physical. his doctor sent him to a urologist who happens to be the Dept Chair of Urology at the hospital/university. Jeff liked and trusted him immediately. another PSA test showed 6.5 and the biopsy showed 2 areas with Gleason of 6. On July 27 we were given those results and when Jeff asked his doctor what he would do if he were in his shoes, his doctor replied "I was there 4 years ago. I had the radical open surgery and I'm fine." so Jeff took that as his answer on what to do. I would have researched other options but Jeff had his mind made up. we had originally thought we'd go with radiation seed implants, but Jeff decided not to. Keep asking questions everywhere you go and you'll find a good doctor and be able to make that decision.

Jeff is also self-employed and returned to work full time 12 days after surgery. he stayed in the hospital 36 hours, had the catheter removed one week after surgery. he has some incontinence - is dry throughout the night, most mornings, and will start dribbling later in the day (when he's had more water and coffee and is more stressed). he has not had an erection yet but has had several climaxes. This is 4 weeks after surgery.

Best wishes to you as you go through this journey.

aus
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 211
   Posted 9/25/2006 5:22 AM (GMT -7)   

Very Briefly,

I always suggest the book "Prostate Cancer Prevention  and Cure" by Lee Nelson.

He covers diagnosis, stages, treatment options, selecting your doctor, lifestyle changes, diet, nutrition, suppelments etc etc.

Although written a few years ago, it will answer your questions.

Selecting your doctor is THE most important aspect, and lifestyle changes are also very important, regardless of what wlse  you choose to do.

 

John


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 9/25/2006 10:05 AM (GMT -7)   
New PC,
Wow, a man who's clearly on the ball with his health care! Good for you! Glad to see you are already doing your homework.

Now, Where do you live? There are many fine institutions scattered around the U.S. I'm looking at the % of cancer in the 3 positive cores and two are giving somewhat of a hint. Your cancer is not going to be tiny. May not be large but it won't be small either. Question...are all 3 on the same side? Was there a palpable lump found? These things make somwhat of a difference. Good news is, your PSA and Gleason are both on the low side!

You want an opinion? Mine is just my own and nothing more. IF you were my husband, I'd hope you would consider an open surgery by a very very skilled surgeon. Now, no one can tell a person what to do with his body. That is obviously up to you. My thought is that any hint of a not so small cancer means there is also a bigger risk of positive margines etc. A hands on, feel the organ surgeon with a lot of skill just plain sounds smart to me. If you decide on a Lap or Robotic go straight for one of the most experienced. In that situation I'd seek out someone like Menon in Detroit for example. If you decide on radiation, are you anywhere where Proton Beam is available? Just throwing out ideas.
Everyone here has some good experience to share. Just say the word and someone can help you. Swim

Rick54
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 40
   Posted 9/25/2006 10:28 AM (GMT -7)   
Unlike swimom, many of us here swear by the DaVinci robotic laproscopic surgery. Again, it is just our opinion.

I had surgery on Sept 13th, with one of the more experienced surgeons in the Mid-Atlantic. I am doing quite well, with just a bit of soreness at times. So far, I have had virtually no incontinence issues, but I am one of the lucky few in that.

You dont say where you are, but I am sure many will suggest surgeons in your area. Also, your urologist is a good source for a recommendation if you decide on the surgical route.

For me, surgery seemed like a no brainer. I preferred to know that the cancer would be gone entirely.

Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 9/25/2006 11:42 AM (GMT -7)   
Rick54,

My husband did in fact, have his prostatectomy done with the DaVinci assist.
I AM an advocate for what ever a person feels best doing. He was most comfortable with the robotic procedure and his clinical stage did support his decision.

As I said, the post is only my opinion...nothing more! Guess you could say I am somewhat of a coward. Not fully accepting (or trusting?) of the robotic procedures in every situation. Positive margine averages are still higher with the robotic assisted prostatectomy although it appears to be improving. Maybe it's that hands on occupation I have. I feel for everything that cannot be measured visually alone or with a monitor. Then again, maybe I just read too much :>)

Another reason is that in our experience.....Paul had 4 cores positive I guess you could say. One was less than 10% of a 3+3 and 3 others were atypical suspicious for cancer; 3 were on one side. His tumor burden was still +16% by volume in a 40gm prostate. The largest area of cancer measured 2.5cc or about 2.5 sugar cubes in size.......that's why I have the opinon I have. A prostate isn't much bigger than a walnut therefore, what sounded so little wasn't going to be. Just the number of positive cores on one side told us that. Atypical and 10% or not, 3 on one side was = to 50% of the cores taken. No matter what, every person should weigh and decide for himself.
I would hope my husband would let me know if he thought I should consider options if the situation called for it. this is all my own person thoughts out loud. Not to be taken as medical advise. Swim

56pontiac
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 230
   Posted 9/25/2006 3:32 PM (GMT -7)   
You will become somewhat of an expert on this subject very quickly. Mine is coming out on 10/12/06 with the DaVinci. I will post my results after it happens. A friend of mine who had the radioactive seeds five years ago (and would not do that again) just called to tell me about his friend that just had his out with the Davinci robot where I'm going three weeks ago. This guy is going to be out of town on a business trip all week so I can't talk to him personally but will when he gets back. If he is up and running around in three weeks that is a pretty good indication of how much better the robot is than the open. There are a lot of factors for recovery time, the main one being what kind of physical shape are you in before the surgery? I don't know where you are but if you are not close to a facility that has done lots of surgeries laproscopic robotic and open run as fast as you can to a competent surgeon where they have done a bunch. I also got rid of my first Urologist because of his age. I want some younger guy that has been fooling with computers and video games since grade school. Whatever, ASK LOTS OF QUESTIONS AND REMEMBER IT IS YOUR BODY NOT THEIRS AND YOU DESERVE THE VERY BEST FOR YOURSELF.

shepla
Regular Member


Date Joined Sep 2006
Total Posts : 102
   Posted 9/28/2006 10:37 AM (GMT -7)   
SJC, Man! you nailed it! I feel the same way! I am going for my open RP at Sloan Memorial NYC DR. Eastham Oct 12th 2006. I am 59 3.3 PSA Gleason 3+3=6 T1c Iam thinking positively and getting ready. I gave 2 pints just in case. My Doc has done over 2,000 of these thats why I picked him. Anyway let me know how you are. and Any Tips! Feeling Like OH BOY here we GO!!!! Good Luck! Mike K.

SJC
Regular Member


Date Joined Jul 2006
Total Posts : 113
   Posted 9/28/2006 8:43 PM (GMT -7)   
To Mike K (shepla):

You followed the best tip I could give you......you selected James Eastham as your surgeon.

It's been eight weeks since my surgery. Been pad free for three weeks; running again every morning for two weeks (waited six weeks post surgery before heavy exercise); ran five miles in 50 minutes today. Feeling very good. Working full time with no fatigue at end of the day.

Given the excellence of your surgeon, your Gleason, PSA and stage, I'm betting you will have a similar result as mine described in my above post.

JustJulie
Regular Member


Date Joined Mar 2006
Total Posts : 355
   Posted 9/29/2006 7:05 AM (GMT -7)   

Brachytherapy

I can only speak of one procedure - Brachytherapy - as that is what my husband chose.  He had all three options, surgery, external beam radiation or internal seed implant therapy known as Brachytherapy.

My husband was 44, Gleason 6 and PSA of 3.74.  Because of the location of his turmour, surgery was more risky as it effected other major organs so he opted for Brachytherapy.

One day in the hospital.  Depending on your line of work can determine how long you are off work.  My husband's job involves long hours and is physically demanding so he stayed off for awhile as the fatigue is one of the biggest factors.

My advice to you?  Investigate every option and make the decision that is best for you.  Everyone who has chosen a specific procedure believes it is the best one - only you can make that decision by getting all the the information you can get your hands on.

If you have a significant other, involve them, this will effect them to.  Be open in your discussion and be open to hearing their thoughts - it is an emotional time for everyone and I wish you well.


floridarobert
New Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 11
   Posted 12/26/2006 2:01 PM (GMT -7)   

What your doctor does not tell you.

 

In December 2005 I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The urologist game me a pamphlet which spelled out the choices for treatment.   After reading the pamphlet I started to read via the Internet and found more treatment option than the pamphlet recommended.

 

In the U.S. the treatments are typically 1. watchful waiting; 2. radiation (several kinds) and 3. surgery to remove the prostate.  

 

  1. Watchful waiting capitalizes on the usual slow growing nature of prostate cancer.  If one is over age 70 or 75 one might die of something else before prostate cancer kills.  The operative word is “might” as the available information is statistcaly based. If  a high percentage of people with prostate cancer will experience slow growth of the cancer, that does not rule out the small percentage that might have cancer that is spreading to other parts of the body.  It is not easy to distinguish slow growing from fast growing cancer.  In addition men are living longer these days; waiting is risky.               

 

 

  1. Radiation either by beam or by wire of one source or another tend to kill the cancer but also carry some unwanted side effects: impotence and incontinence (fecal and/or urinary).

 

  1. Radical prostatectomy carries similar side effects as radiation.

 

After reading about the above options I was not happy with any.    I  kept reading and found hormonal treatment, freezing,  and ultrasound. Hormonal treatment and freezing (cryo surgery) which  both carry significant levels of unwanted side effects.  High intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) appeared most promising.

 

HIFU

 

Hifu has been used in Europe and Asia more than a decade to treat benignly enlarged prostate.  More than a half dozen years ago this method has been used for treating prostate cancer. This is the least invasive treatment for prostate cancer that carries the possibility of a cure.  There is no incision and side effects appear to be less than other methods.  Since this is experimental one is engaging in a degree of risk since large numbers of patients over many years have not yet been studied. 

 

From my amateurish reading of literature on the internet, it appeared to me that HIFU offered similar survival rates to someone in my situation (T1C; psa 4.6; Gleason score of 6) with less likelihood of  such side effects as impotence, incontinence, and  fistula.  Perhaps radical prostatectomy has a slightly better cure rate.

 

 

Among HIFU machines, I chose Sonablate over Ablatherm largely because Sonablate gives the physician a live image.

 

I emailed a number of different practitioners and researchers  who use Sonablate in Italy, England, Germany, U.S.A. and Japan. Most responded quickly and were willing to answer my questions.

 

I asked each physician about price and how much experience they had.   The American physicians were the most expensive($20,000 for treatment in Dominican Republic or Mexico), followed by the English, Japanese and finally two  Italians.   Dr. Durso in Torino, Italy was willing to do the procedure for about $7800. With my love for Italy and a good price, I nearly chose him. I then learned there was an “upgrade” to the machine; when I asked him about the upgrade, he did not respond.  I finally chose Dr. Uchida who not only has the most up to date equipment, but he has more experience than any other person working with Sonablate.  For $10,000 I could employ the services of one of the most respected researchers and practitioners in the field.  

 

We arranged for the procedure and I flew to Tokyo on my spring break.  I took my wife and daughter so we could have a little tour of Tokyo, a welcome distraction.  Dr. Uchida met me in the lobby of his hospital, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital.  Hachioji is a suburb of the sprawling city of Tokyo.  I felt as though I was taking the subway to Queens from Manhattan. 

 

Dr. Uchida gave me a room in which my wife and daughter could spend the night.  He spend two hours working on me with the Sonablate from approximately 5- 7 p.m.    I felt very little except the insertion of the catheter through the abdominal wall into by bladder. That felt like someone was trying to jam a screwdriver through my belly.  The next day I was ready to leave the hospital and continue my tour of nearby parks, museums, and temples.  Unfortunately the tube of the catheter prevented me from closing my pants! I was walking around Tokyo with my pants unbuttoned and my shirt tails out covering my front. 

 

The catheter was the most uncomfortable part of this experience, though I never doubted that it was a worthwhile trade off.  I complained to Dr. Uchida who gave me a more flexible tube. It was still irritating but tolerable.  Over the next 3 weeks, increasingly more urine was coming out of my penis than the plastic tube. 

 

I returned to Florida after about 10 days in Tokyo and sought a way to remove the catheter. I had made an appointment with the local urologist who had called for a biopsy.  When I showed up for my appointment to remove the catheter, he refused to see me since I had gone to another doctor.  However annoying that was I called a number of other doctors and found two urologists willing to work with me. 

 

I had my psa tested every 3 months, and it went from 4.6 biopsy, to 5.2 at time of treatment to 1.2  two months after.  Two more tests a few months later yielded 1.3.  I had a biopsy 12 months after the first and 9 months after the HIFU, and all 12 samples were benign.  Such a biopsy does not guarantee that I am cancer free, but I am in pretty good shape to face the future.  Erections have been weaker than prior to the treatment, but I can attain and maintain an erection. There is no ejaculate, but I can climax. Climaxes are slightly weaker than before. I tried the three drugs for erectile dysfunction: Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra each for daily dosage for several weeks.  Levitra worked best for me. I have no other side effects. 

 

I would be happy to talk to anyone interested in HIFU. I am not an expert but I have acquired valuable experience. 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/26/2006 2:30 PM (GMT -7)   
Unproven treatments in unprotected places warrent a lot of investigation and a patient willing to take the risks involved. HFIU is in phase 3 trials at Indiana University. Anyone considering HFIU might consider contacting them before heading off to lands unknown. Complications could mean physical problems and financial ruin.

JMHO, Paul

ed from pa
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 12/28/2006 9:12 AM (GMT -7)   

Amen to that swimom! You want to go where treatment is a proven success, not just in one case, but in many, many, cases. Remember the treatment you choose may not be reverseable. And there is only one of you. You have to do your homework on this one. The test is either pass or fail.

all the best,

 

ed from pa

Jesus Christ large C - cancer small c


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/28/2006 10:18 AM (GMT -7)   
I just think of SL and DW,

They had a terrible experience... with a good final outcome thank goodness. I am so happy things finally turned aroudn and that DW is doing well. The experience they went through has me very concerned about what could happen in strange places. We have enough to worry about here and we have the best care in the world. Very scary stuff.

Swim

Pete trips again!
Veteran Member


Date Joined Nov 2006
Total Posts : 1899
   Posted 12/28/2006 10:37 AM (GMT -7)   
Holy Smokes, thats a new one on me! I'm w/ Swim & Ed on that one! Don't think I'd trust anything out of the good old USA. Just my opinion! As for me, New PC, as you can see by my stats below, I had a Radical over three years ago. I was dry the day they took my cath. out, did not use any pads and had intercourse w/ out any pills 6 weks later @ about 70% compared to pre-surgery. I agree w/ Swim that I liked having the surgin's hands doing the job although they didn't offer the robotic back when I had mine. I had 150% faith in the Doc I had at Johns Hopkins and agree that you should pick a top surgin. They are playing with your life here. Good luck my friend, I'm sure you will make t5he right descision!
Your friend Pete
53 years old, Surgury, Radical Prostatectomy 8/20/03, PSA 6.6, Gleason 3 + 3 = 6, Adenocarcinoma extent (moderate) Stage & Margin:T2NOMX, No Metastases, Organ Confined, bone scan: Neg.  


ed from pa
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 12/28/2006 2:19 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey floridarobert, This is some scary stuff to say the least, man how do you sleep at night?
 
 
                            
                                      " I had my psa tested every 3 months, and it went from 4.6 biopsy, to 5.2 at time of treatment to 1.2  two months after.  Two more tests a few months later yielded 1.3.  I had a biopsy 12 months after the first and 9 months after the HIFU, and all 12 samples were benign.  Such a biopsy does not guarantee that I am cancer free, but I am in pretty good shape to face the future.  Erections have been weaker than prior to the treatment, but I can attain and maintain an erection. There is no ejaculate, but I can climax. Climaxes are slightly weaker than before. I tried the three drugs for erectile dysfunction: Cialis, Levitra, and Viagra each for daily dosage for several weeks.  Levitra worked best for me. I have no other side effects  "  
 
When i got my pathology report it read, all the cancer was contained in the prostate, nothing outside the prostate, meaning i am clear, lymph nodes, bones. Now that to me is peace of mind. I do not care if i climax or not. This is not the issue here. The issue here is LIFE and DEATH! I really do not think you get it! Floridarobert have a great life. Sorry i am so blunt, but man there are bigger issues here than erections, climaxes. Of course you don't have any side effects, they didn't do anything! Holy cats! You know what,
 
 they sell peach pits in mexico for breast cancer too, $10,000  a treatment. Everybody dies!!!!!     
 
ed from pa
 
Jesus Christ big C - cancer small c              

spinbiscuit
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 818
   Posted 12/28/2006 2:30 PM (GMT -7)   

One last thought is if you opt for a treatment out of country, and it is not yet approved; then you may have some difficulties locating a urologist here that will do follow-ups on the procedure such as the removal of the cathator.

Glen


Diagnosed at age 60
PSA went from 2.2 to 3.8 in 14 months
2 of 14 cores positive at 10%
Gleason 6(3+3), negative DRE, neg. boundaries
DaVinci surgery on 02/23/06
 


Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/28/2006 7:07 PM (GMT -7)   
Hey,

Gee, what a conversation I started. I am not against HFIU! It's a viable treatment in phase 3 trials here in the US...which means in a couple of years it may well be a coice for everyone. I believe it's being used with some frequency in Canada and in Europe where standards of care are higher. Standard of care. Everyone say that all together...standard of care!

Swim

ed from pa
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 12/28/2006 7:27 PM (GMT -7)   

Standard of Care, i get it, but floridiarobert does not get it. Not that i have read so far, maybe i am missing something here? Lets talk about the cure and hope, not erections and climaxes. All that comes latter on down the road. Lets get rid of the cancer period. Not worry everytime you go for a biopsie or psa that you now have cancer. Now what do i do, go back to Tokyo for another treatment? Sorry i am a little upset with this thread, but what i have been through and what everyone else has been through, then read about this stuff that might work, or might not work. This is like playing russian roullete. Lets try to give sound advice that one has expierenced with positive numbers.

 

ed from pa

Help me Jesus!



Swimom
Veteran Member


Date Joined Apr 2006
Total Posts : 1732
   Posted 12/28/2006 8:48 PM (GMT -7)   
No need to be upset Ed,

I should't have poo-hooed the man's (sorry floridarobert) decision in the first place. It's his choice and none of my business how he went about having that treatment done. I spouted off an opinion, nothing else. Can't speak for the better half.

Most of what we (hubby and myself) know about HFIU is what SL and DWT have shared and what we've dug up on the net. I asked one surgeon about the treatment and didn't get too much of an answer. One day maybe I'll run into Dr. Lee. Until then all we have are the experiences of others....so Robert, thanks for sharing. My personal bias should not prevent others from sharing.

Swim

ed from pa
Regular Member


Date Joined Dec 2006
Total Posts : 42
   Posted 12/29/2006 4:40 AM (GMT -7)   

PEACE everyone.

 

ed from pa

Jesus Christ big C

cancer small c


bluebird
Veteran Member


Date Joined May 2006
Total Posts : 2542
   Posted 12/30/2006 8:22 PM (GMT -7)   

re: 11 duplicate postings from floridarobert

 

Hey Paul (via Swimom),

 

Thanks for taking the “BULL” by the horns on this one.  I too was really ticked to see this and now I feel comfortable about replying…..

 

Mama Bluebird’s 2 cents worth.

 

1.      It bothers me tremendously that someone can go on our forum and place the same 11 postings on 11 different threads.  (one was placed on a thread that the last posting was 9-29… so this tells us something…)

2.      This tells me that they don’t really give a “S_ _ _” about communicating with us on an individual level.

3.      This is where a moderator should come in and “delete” all of the said “11” postings.

4.         If this information is so important that this individual wants to share. 

Then….. HE/SHE should start a NEW THREAD with their information they want to get out.

 

Good GOSH….. now I feel better!!!!!!!!!

 

I’ve been really p’od at this posting from .....floridarobert. 

 

The good that “might” come out of this is that

New pc diagnosed…. Author may re-join us….

This would be a good thing!!!!!

 

The end……….. tongue


mama bluebird - Lee & Buddy… from North Carolina

April 3, 2006  53 on surgery day

RRP / Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy with "wide excision"

PSA 4.6   Gleason  3+3=6    T2a  

Confined to Prostate   June 29th ~ PSA Less than 0.1 Non-detectable

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